Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

Legal Aid System in Nepal

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
 
    
1
2
CHAPTER‐ I 
 
1.1   INTRODUCTION  
 
Legal  Aid  is  essentially  a  mechanism  that  enables  the  poor  and  the 
vuln...
3
 
All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.  Every 
person should have equal access to justice whe...
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Nächste SlideShare
legal aid
legal aid
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 54 Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Ähnlich wie Legal Aid System in Nepal (20)

Anzeige

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

Legal Aid System in Nepal

  1. 1.        1
  2. 2. 2 CHAPTER‐ I    1.1   INTRODUCTION     Legal  Aid  is  essentially  a  mechanism  that  enables  the  poor  and  the  vulnerable sectors of the society to be able to enforce their legal rights in  order to access a fair and equitable justice in the society. In a democratic  country, it is an immitigable prerequisite that all citizens get economic  and social justice in one way or another. Therefore as long as the poor  exist in the society, a legal aid will be necessary to uphold human rights  and equality for one and all.1      Legal Aid is defined as “The Free or inexpensive legal services provided to  those  who  cannot  afford  to  pay  full  price,  Legal  Aid  is  usually  administrated locally by a specially established organization”2  .    The term “Legal Aid” is defined as a system of government founding for  those  who  cannot  afford  to  pay  for  legal  advice  assistance  and  representation” Legal Aid could be provided in there kinds they are: Legal  Advice or Assistance, Civil Legal Aid and Criminal Legal Aid 3 .      According to The Legal Aid Act, 1997: "The term Legal Aid means, Legal  Aid  to  the  indigent  person  under  this  act  and  the  term  also  includes  counseling  and  other  legal  services  such  as  correspondence  pleadings,  preparation of legal documents and proceedings in the courts or offices  on behalf of indigent person.4     Access  to  Justice  is  typically  thought  of  as  a  jural  relation  between  a  citizen  or  a  group  with  rights  and  the  state  as  an  independent  service  provider. Access to justice is not just a moral imperative, but a legal right,  under the ambit of international law, and the constitutional and national  laws  of  states.    Under  international  law,  and  indeed  the  laws  of  most  states,  this  is  not  just  a  legal  right  but  a  human  right,  which  must  be  recognized, implemented and practiced by all states.5      1 Md. Nannu Mian & Md. Mamunur Rashid, A critical analysis of Legal Aid in Bangladesh, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH, Microthink Institute, March 2014, Url: http://dx.doi.org/10.5296/ijssv.v2i1.5268, at 140 , ( 2 Sep. 2016) 2 BLACK'S LAW DICTIONARY (9th ed.), at 975 (2009) 3 LEGAL AID HANDBOOK, Legal Aid Board, Sweer and Maxweu, London, at.2 ,(1992) 4 Legal Aid Act, Sec.2 (1997) 5 AYESHA  KADWANI  DIAS  &  GITA  HONWANA  WELCH  (Eds.),  JUSTICE  FOR  THE  POOR  PERSPECTIVE  ON  ACCLERATING ACCESS, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, India at. 3, (2011)
  3. 3. 3   All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.  Every  person should have equal access to justice when their dignity or rights  are infringed therefore; human dignity is always at risk if a justice system  is not able to ensure equal access to justice. Obstacle in access to justice  is  a  key  challenge  being  faced  by  almost  all  societies  across  the  world;  however, this problem is more serious in poor countries, and especially  for the people who are living in poverty and destitute. Impediment in the  way  to  justice,  thus,  leads  vulnerable  and  marginalized  towards  more  vulnerability  and  marginalization.  Strikingly,  access  to  justice  is  widely  embraced and routinely violated aspects of human rights.6      It  is  well  accepted  that  fundamental  duty  of  the  government  is  to  maintain  law  and  order  within  the  country.  For  this,  it  is  necessary  to  establish the rule of law7 . But to promote and secure the rule of law, it is  essential that the population of the country have basic knowledge of the  fields of law important to their daily life and also that there are means  available for them to engage Legal Aid when needed. But providing free  legal  aid  to  the  poor  section  of  the  population,  a  precondition  for  claiming or defending own rights is of course that they are aware of what  their rights are. Consequently there is also a strong need for educating  the population about their rights and make them aware of their rights.    State  has to  render  justice  to  all,  whether  rich  or  poor  and  should  not  make any distinction among its peoples on the basis of wealth, power and  prestige.  All  citizens  are  equal  in  the  eyes  of  law  irrespective  of  their  financial  positions,  but  economic  inequality  has  made  justice  beyond  reach of the weaker sections of the people8 . If justice is denied, law is said  to  be  non‐prevailing.  The  effective  Legal  Aid  program  is  an  effective  means in the realization of principles of justice.     It is not necessary that person involved in cases, either civil or criminal,  should  have  knowledge  on  law  or  the  provisions  of  law.  Since  law  is  specialized or technical subject, not all persons can be expected to have  idea on the legal intricacies. And even if a person involved in legal action  6 Nahkul Subedi, A Normative Dilemma on Access to Justice: Much Emphasis on ACCESS and Little on Justice -Need to Revisit the Socio-legal Interface, NJA LAW JOURNAL SPECIAL ISSUE, at 50, National Judicial Academy, Lalitpur (2012) 7 Bhimarjun Acharya, Are the Modern States Government Under the Rule of Law? ESSAYS ON CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, Vol.38, at 66 Nepal Law Society, (2001) 8 A REPORT FOR ICJ/NEPAL SECTION IN COOPERATION WITH ICJ/GENEVA, Legal Aid and Legal literacy Scheme in Nepal, at 6, (1994)
  4. 4. 4 has  knowledge  of  law  he  may  not  be  in  a  position  to  defend  his  case.  Further a common man is mainly the object of the adverse consequences.  He/she may be confused by the multiplicity of the body of laws involving  cumbersome procedures.   Added to be the exorbitant fees demanded by the lawyers, which are far  beyond  the  reach  of  a  common  man.  Hence  the  rapid  and  complex  development of legal system makes the requirement of legal aid in lots of  cases.  Extending  help  of  lawyers  to  needy  free  of  cost  reflects  the  philosophy of legal aid in modern society9 .     In the absence of Legal Aid to the destitute party to litigation, Judge can  hardly protect the interests. Therefore, legal aid is an essential ingredient  for due process of law. Necessity of Legal aid cannot be ignored. Absence  of legal aid means the deprivation of Justice10 .     In  Nepal  more  that  half  (83%)  of  the  population  is  living  in  rural  and  remote  areas,  per  capita  income  is  very  low  i.e.  USD  717  only  and  25.2  percent  of  the  population  is  living  under  poverty  line  and  illiteracy  is  about 35% shows the poor socio economic conditions of our country so  the  access  to  justice  seems  far  beyond  the  reach  of  a  common  man;  Therefore the necessity and importance of providing free legal assistance  is inevitable so as to realize the principle of justice in the country.11      The  vast  majority  of  Nepalese  people  are  unaware  on  employing  legal  counsel to protect their genuine cause and interests. Though, the people  who  are  aware  of  their  rights  but  due  to  being  physically,  socio‐ economically disadvantaged they have no access to the legal assistantship  provided by the concerned authorities and also, the majority of educated  population  being  not  able  to  understand  the  legal  provisions  and  legal  intricacies.  So  a  kind  of  fear  always  remains  in  the  mind  of  general  population to involve in legal matters. So Legal Aid and Legal Literacy is  very important to establish rule of law and equitable treatment by law in  our country.     Legal Aid and Legal Literacy have been much‐discussed subjects in Nepal  for the last few decades. The constitution of Nepal 2015 in the article 20  (10) has guaranteed the Legal Aid right as the fundamental right as "Any  9 Supra note 8, at.3 10 Ibid at 7 11 STATISTICAL YEAR BOOK OF NEPAL, CBS, GON, (2013)
  5. 5. 5 indigent  party  shall  have  the  right  to  free  legal  aid  in  accordance  with  law"12 .  There  are  also  many  professional  and  non‐governmental  organizations  have  been  involved  in  promoting  Legal  Aid  and  legal  literacy programs in the country.       1.2  STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM    Nepal  is  facing  major  socio  economic  problems  and  majority  of  the  population  living  in  rural  and  remote  areas  are  illiterate  and  disadvantaged  with  problems  of  poverty  and  also  the  majority  of  population  are  not  aware  of  the  fundamental  rights  and  free  legal  assistantship guaranteed  by  the constitution and  laws.  The enacted  law  relating  to  Legal  Aid  (Legal  Aid  Act,  1997  and  its  Rule  1998)  seems  unrealistic, unscientific and inadequate in order to cover the sole concept  of legal aid.     The sustainable institutional framework seems lacking and there are very  few  organization  involved  in  providing  free  legal  aid  and  legal  literacy  programs. The programs launched by central legal aid project and other  civil  society  organizations  have  generally  short‐term  programs  and  are  confined to the small and urban areas of the country only. Such programs  seem  unable  to  cover  the  welfare  right of  the  indigent  people  and  they  have also lots of shortcomings, specially in mountainous and remote hill  districts. In addition to this, these districts also lack sufficient number of  lawyers as well.     The  State  Paid  Lawyer  Stipendiary  Lawyer  system  has  also  not  been  effective due to lack of specific knowledge on the specific subject, short‐ term  appointment,  lack  of  motivation,  due  to  minimum  remuneration  and incompetence.              12 THE CONSTITUTION OF NEPAL, ART 20(10) (2015)
  6. 6. 6 The major problem statements of this study are:    1. Are  the  prevailing  laws  related  to  Legal  Aid  in  Nepal  effective  and  adequate to provide access to justice to the indigent people?    2. Are  the  major  sources  of  Legal  Aid  (organizations/  institutions)  efficient and effective to maintain and promote the Legal Aid System  and Legal Literacy in Nepal?      1.3  OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY      The objective of the study was as follows:  1.   To  identify  some  main  provisions  on  Access  to  Justice  in  International Instruments and the Concept of Legal Aid System in  Nepal.    2.  To  access  the  contribution  of  the  some  major  organizations  or  agencies working for Legal Aid and Legal Assistance in Nepal and  to study their contribution for the promotion of legal aid and to  analyze their strengths & weaknesses.    3.   To  assess  and  analyze  the  prevailing  laws  related  to  Legal  Aid  System in Nepal and to analyze their strength and weakness.       
  7. 7. 7 CHAPTER‐ II    INTERNATIONAL INSTRUMENTS & HISTORICAL  BACKGROUND OF ACCESS TO JUSTICE AND LEGAL AID       2.1  SOME  MAIN  PROVISIONS  ON  ACCESS  TO  JUSTICE  IN  INTERNATIONAL INSTRUMENTS    Access to justice is not just a moral imperative, but a legal right, under  the ambit of international law, and the constitutional and national laws  of states.  Under international law, and indeed the laws of most states,  this is not just a legal right but a human right, which must be recognized,  implemented and practiced by all states.    Access to Justice refers not only to the establishment of institutions and  procedural rules granting access to all, but also to the substantive laws  themselves , and the empowerment of the individuals to obtain justice.13   Some of the major International or (UN instruments) recognizing access  to  justice  rights  as  a  fundamental  rights.  Which  can  be  presented  as  follows:14   Table No.‐1  Main Provisions on Access to Justice in International Instruments  S N Internation al Legal  Instrument s  Provisions on Access to Justice      1    UNIVERSAL  DECLARATI ON OF  HUMAN  RIGHTS  (UDHR)  1948      Article 7: The right that all are equal before the law, non  discrimination and the equal protection of the law to all.    Article 8: The right of everyone to an effective remedy  for violation of the fundamental rights guaranteed under  the law.    Article 9: Freedom from arbitrary arrest or detention or  13 AYESHA  KADWANI  DIAS  &  GITA  HONWANA  WELCH  (eds.),  JUSTICE  FOR  THE  POOR  PERSPECTIVE  ON  ACCLERATING ACCESS, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, India at. 5‐6, (2011) 14 Ibid at.63-71
  8. 8. 8 exile.    Article  10:  Right  to  a  fair  and  public  hearing    by  an  independent  and  impartial  tribunal,  in  the  determination of rights and obligations and of criminal  charge.  Article 11: The right to presumption of innocent.    2  THE  INTERNATI ONAL  COVENANT  ON CIVIL  AND  POLITICAL  RIGHTS  (ICCPR)  (1976)    Article 14: Equality before the courts and tribunals; The  right  to  fair  and  public  hearing  by  a  competent,  independent and impartial tribunal established by law;    Any judgment given in a criminal case or in a suit at law  shall  be  made  public  except  where  the  interest  of  juveniles  otherwise  require  or  the  proceedings  concern  matrimonial disputes or the guardianship of children;  The  right  to  the  presumption  of  innocence;  Every  accused shall be entitled to these minimum guarantees:    • To be informed promptly and in detail in a language  which he or she understands of the nature and cause  of the charge against him or her;  • To  have  adequate  time  and  facilities  for  the  preparation of his or her defense and to communicate  with counsel of his or her own choosing;  • To be tried without undue delay;  • To be tried in his or her presence;  • And to defend himself or herself in person or through  legal assistance of his or her own choosing.  • To  be  informed,  if  he  or  she  does  not  have  legal  assistance, of this right; and to have legal  assistance  assigned to him or her, in any case where the interest  of justice so require, and without payment by him or  her  in  any  such  case  if  he  or  she  does  not  have  sufficient means to pay for it.  • To  examine,  or  have  examined,  the  witness  against  him or her and obtain the attendance and examination  of  witness  on  his  or  her  behalf  under  the  same  condition as witness against him or her, 
  9. 9. 9 • To  have  the  free  assistance  of  an interpreter  if  he  or  she cannot understand or speak the language used in  court, and   • Not  to  be  compelled  to  testify  against  himself  or  herself or to confess guilt.  Anyone who is convicted of a crime shall have the right  to  his  or  her  conviction  and  sentence  reviewed  by  a  higher tribunal according to law.  3  INTERNATI ONAL  COVENANT  ON  ECONOMIC,  SOCIAL  AND  CULTURAL  RIGHTS  (ICESCE)  1976      Article  2:.  Each  State  Party  to  the  present  Covenant  undertakes  to  take  steps,  individually  and  through  international  assistance  and  co‐operation,  especially  economic and technical, to the maximum of its available  resources, with a view to achieving progressively the full  realization  of  the  rights  recognized  in  the  present  Covenant  by  all  appropriate  means,  including  particularly the adoption of legislative measures.   The  States  guarantee  that  the  rights  enunciated  in  the  covenant will be exercised without discrimination of any  kind as to race, colour, sex, language, religion, political  or  other  opinion,  national  or  social  origin,  property,  birth or other status.   Article  3:  The  States  Parties  to  the  present  Covenant  undertake to ensure the equal right of men and women  to  the  enjoyment  of  all  economic,  social  and  cultural  rights set forth in the present Covenant.    4  INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON THE PROTECTION OF THE  RIGHTS OF ALL MIGRANT WORKERS AND MEMBERS OF THEIR  FAMILIES (CMWF) (1990):  (Article 18)  5  AARHUS CONVENTION, 1998 (Article 9: Access to Justice )  6  BASIC  PRINCIPLES  ON  THE  INDEPENDENCE  OF  THE  JUDICIARY  (BPIJ) 1985: (Principle 1 to 7 & 10)  7  BASIC PRINCIPLES ON THE ROLE OF LAWYERS (1990): (Principle 1  to 8, 13, 14, 19 &21)  8  GUIDELINES ON THE ROLE OF PROSECUTORS, 1990: (Guidelines 2,  10, 12, 16, 18 & 20)  9  DECLARATION OF BASIC PRINCIPLES OF JUSTICE FOR VICTIMS OF  CRIME AND ABUSE OF POWER, 1985: (Principles 4 & 8)   
  10. 10. 10 2.2 SOME GLOBAL IMPEDIMENTS TO ACCESS TO JUSTICE:     In  spite  of  these  various  legislative  instruments,  for  a  large  section  of  people, there are various impediments to obtaining justice at all stages of  the formal judicial process‐ that is , pre‐trial, trial, and post‐trial. This is  so in both developed and developing countries, although the nature and  extent of the challenges may differ across countries. In the first instance,  individual  can  only  access  the  justice  system  where  they  are  aware  of  their rights and have the appropriate support, especially in the form of  legal services, from qualified practiceners. A forum where rights can be  enforced and an environment where rights can be pursued without fear  or intimidation are essential.       However, in reality, many individuals are ignorant of their rights due to a  lack of information about the law, a situation that is exacerbated in the  poorest of countries by illiteracy. Obtaining legal advice and other forms  of  professional  legal  support  is  very  expensive  and  is  therefore  out  of  reach for the poor. Legal Aid services, even where they exist, are highly  under  ‐founded  and  inadequate,  and  as  such,  access  to  effective  legal  advice and representation is more or less a preserve of the rich even in  the richest countries. Even where poor people obtain legal support, The  quality of this is not comparable to that obtained by the rich. This in turn  could  have  an  impact  on  the  justice  obtained  so  that  there  is  unequal  justice.    In  poorer  countries  not  only  lawyers,  but  even  the  courts,  which  are  usually situated in the towns and cities, are not easily accessible from the  more remote rural areas. Sometimes this could involve a whole day's trip  with  the  cost  representing  a  very  high  proportion  of  an  individual's  monthly  earnings.  Usually  owing  to  factors  such  as  poor  facilities,  complex procedural rules, and a very high number of cases, the courts are  unable  to  cope  effectively.  Inordinate  delays,  language  barriers,  and  inappropriate or ineffectual remedies further alienate litigants, especially  the poor, minorities, and other vulnerable groups, who either do not have  the  resources  to  conclude  the  process  or  consider  the  remedies  not  worthy of the time and financial investment involved.15       15 Supranote 13, at 6
  11. 11. 11 2.3.  HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF LEGAL AID    2.3.1 Europe & America :  There has been a long tradition of States providing some form of legal aid  to the poor in the majority legal systems. A quite ancient right to access  to justice dates back to England in the 1400s where the Statute of Henry  VII (1495) waived all fees for indigent civil litigants in the common law  courts  and  empowered  the  courts  to  appoint  lawyers  to  provide  representation in court without compensation.   During  the  19th  Century,  most  Continental  codes  of  law  contained  the  principle  of  the  “poor  man’s  law”,  providing  court  fee  waivers  and  appointment of duty counsel for the very poor. However, it was not until  the 1940s and 1950s, that formal, comprehensive and statutorily funded  legal aid schemes were established. These earlier legal aid service, such as  England’s  national  legal  aid  system  established  in  1949  and  Ontario,  Canada’s provincial legal aid service established in 1951, were tended to  give priority to only criminal law matters.   Nevertheless,  in  the  United  States,  in  1960s,  a  broader  approach  developed  with  respect  to  the  role  of  legal  aid  and  legal  services  in  general. Services under legal aid schemes were extended to address the  “unmet  needs”  of  the  poor,  which  included  housing,  social  security,  family and debt issues. This philosophy spread to Canada, Australia and  Europe starting of the clinic or law center movement. By the end of the  1960s and early 1970s, this transformed perception of social justice gave  rise  to  the ‘access  to  justice’  movement.  Access  to  justice  means  effective, efficient access to the law requiring not only legal advice and  representation in court, but also information and education of the law,  reform and a willingness to be able to identify the unmet needs of the  poor.   In the same time there was another significant development in Europe  regarding  legal  aid.  The  European  Conference  of  Ministers  issued  a  declaration on legal aid in the late 1970s, which considered the right of  access  to  justice  as  an  essential  feature  of  any  democratic  society  and  firmly stated that legal aid no longer could be considered a charity but as  an  obligation  of  the  community  as  a  whole. The  resolution  dealt  with 
  12. 12. 12 both  criminal  and  civil  legal  aid,  calling  on  States  to  accept  the  responsibility for financing these legal aid systems.16   The earliest Legal Aid movement appears in France in the year 1851 when  some  enactment  was  introduced  for  providing  legal  assistance  to  the  indigent. In Britain, the history of the organized efforts on the part of the  State to provide legal services to the poor and needy dates back to 1944.  In  USA  before  the  adoption  of  the  Federal  Constitution,  1799,  the  Constitution of Maryland had declared ‘That, in all criminal prosecutions,  every man had a right… to be allowed counsel…’similarly Constitution of  Massachusetts  adopted  in  1780,  New  Hampshire  in  1784,  New  York  in  1777 and Pennsylvania in 1776, had also declared to the same effect.17    The concept of legal aid was emerged and flourished all over the world,  only after the global impact of second word war after the formation of  UNO  for  world  peace  and  human  development,  had  promulgated  The  Manifesto of Universal declaration of Human Rights 1948. In  6‐12 act of  that manifesto the provision of legal equality and legal security had been  mentioned18 .  After  then,  different  countries  in  the  world  had  accepted  the concept of human rights. Consequently they started to formulate act  and laws accordingly.     In Britain Legal Aid and Legal Advice Act, 1949 and Legal Aid Solicitors  Act,  1949  in  Scotland,  other  countries  like  USA,  Germany,  France,  Norway,  Netherlands,  Newze‐land  etc,  had  also  formulated  Legal  Aid  Acts in 1960’s decade.      2.3.1 South Aisa: SAARC countries:  A. INDIA:    If  we  see  the  history  of  Legal  Aid  in  south  Asia,  India  has  the  oldest  record  in  this  regard.  Since  1952,  the  Govt.  of  India  also  started  addressing to the question of legal aid for the poor in various conferences  16 M. Aftab Udddin: Access to Justice and Legal Aid System of Bangladesh, Government Law Journal Bangladesh (Vol. 1, July 4, 2014), http://www.lawjournalbd.com /2014/07/access-to-justice-and-legal-aid-system-of-bangladesh-government (Accessed 1 Sep. 2016) 17 Sudeep Gautam, Concept, Need and Development of Legal Aid ; NYAYADOOT (CONVENTION SPECIAL ISSUE at. 79, (2059) 18 Bhim Rawal, Free Legal Aid: Development, Concept and Possibility in the Nepalese Context; NYAYADOOT, Vol.4, Part2, Year 19, at 92, (1988)
  13. 13. 13 of Law Ministers and Law Commissions. In 1960, some guidelines were  drawn  by  the  Govt.  for  legal  aid  schemes.  In  different  states  legal  aid  schemes  were  floated  through  Legal  Aid  Boards,  Societies  and  Law  Departments. In 1980, a Committee at the national level was constituted  to oversee and supervise legal aid programmes throughout the country  under the Chairmanship of Hon. Mr. Justice P.N. Bhagwati then a Judge  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  India.  This  Committee  came  to  be  known  as  CILAS  (Committee  for  Implementing  Legal  Aid  Schemes)  and  started  monitoring  legal  aid  activities  throughout  the  country.19   Some  famous  Landmark decisions of Supreme Court of India in regarding legal aid are:    Hussainara Khatoon Vs. Home Secretary, State of Bihar, Patna20    Sunil Batra Vs. Delhi Administration21   Khatri Vs. State of Bihar22    Suk Das & Anr Vs Union Territory of Arunachal23       B. PAKISTAN:    Legal Practitioners and Bar Council Act, 1973 deals with the provision of  legal  aid.  This  section  came  into  operation  when  in  1999  Pakistan  Bar  Council  notified  the  Free  Legal  Aid  Committees  Rules,  1999.  The  Free  Legal Aid Committees Rules, 1999 provide for legal aid committees at the  centre, provinces and districts. Each legal aid committee maintains two  lists of lawyers' panels; lawyers who offer services on pro bono basis, and  those  who  offer  services  on  low  bono  basis.  The  Free  Legal  Aid  Committees  Rules,  1999  require  each  member  of  Pakistan  Bar  Council  and  Provincial  Bar  Councils  to  conduct  at  least  one  case  each  year  assigned to the member by the Legal Aid Committee. There is no secured  funding source and mostly committees rely on funding from the Pakistan  Bar  Council  and  sometimes  grants  from  governments,  NGOs  and  individuals. The Public Defenders & Free Legal Aid Ordinance, 2009 was  a progressive step towards a sustainable legal aid system in the country.  The Ordinance provided for setting up a Public Defender's System. The  Chief Public Defender was heading this office at the Provincial level and  19 National Legal Service Authority (NALSA): Introduction and History of NALSA, http://nalsa.gov.in (Accessed 1 Sep.2016) 20 Hussainara Khatoon Vs. Home Secretary, State of Bihar, Patna, AIR 1979, Sc-1369 21 Sunil Batra Vs. Delhi Administration, AIR 1579,1980, SCR (2) 557 22 Khatri Vs. State of Bihar, AIR, 1981 SC 928 23 Suk Das & Anr Vs Union Territory of Arunachal, AIR 991, 1986 SCR (1) 590
  14. 14. 14 ran legal aid work through the offices of District Public Defenders and  Defenders for Legal Aid Committees. However, this Ordinance yet could  not evolve into a law and became history.24      C. SRI LANKA:    In Sri Lanka Law Society of Ceylon was Incorporated in 1958, Legal Aid  Commission  of  Sri  Lanka  (LAC) is  the  foremost  amongst  the  various  other  institutions  and  organizations  that  cater  to  this  important  requirement,  mainly  due  to  its  sustainability  and  stability. Legal  Aid  Commission was established by the Act No 27 of 1978 and at present it  has 76 Centres Island wide. The Legal Aid Commission has undertaken  many ambitious projects to achieve the above vision. The Mission of the  Legal Aid Commission as stated in the Legal Aid Act No.27 of 1978 is to  provide Legal Aid to all the “Deserving Persons” in the Country.. The LAC  with over 120 permanent Legal Officers and over 1000 panel lawyers from  the regional Bar Associations is the main institution dealing with access  to equitable Justice in Sri Lanka.25      D. BANGLADESH:    The  provision  relating  to  legal  aid  under  Bangladesh  law  was  first  introduced  in  the  Code  of  Civil  Procedure,  1908.  Government  operated  legal  aid  system  in  Bangladesh  was  first  introduced  through  a  national  legal  aid  fund  in  1994,  which  was  later  revived  through  formation  of  National and District Committees in 1997.  Finally, the current legal aid  service under a National Legal Aid Services Organization (NLASO) was  established  by  enacting  the  Legal  Aid  Services  Act,  2000  (as  amended,  LASA 2000)26 .       E. MALDIVES:    According  to  Article  53  of  the  Constitution  2008  of  the  Republic  of  Maldives,  everyone  has  the  right  to  retain  legal  counsel  at  any  point  24 Dr. Suhail Shahzad, Free Legal Aid in Pakistan- Position Paper, Pakistan Institute of Legislative development and Transperancy (PILDAT), Oct.2015, ISBN: 978-969-558-532-0 (Accessed 2 Sep.2016) 25 Legal Aid Commission of Sri Lanka (LAC), http://www.legalaid.gov.lk/index.php/2016-01-13-09-16-07/about-us (Accessed 2 Sep.2016) 26 Supranote 16
  15. 15. 15 where legal assistance is required (Article 539(a)); and in serious criminal  cases,  the  State  is  mandated  to  provide  a  lawyer  for  the  accused  who  cannot afford to engage one (Article 53(b)).1 In addition, several statutes  such as the Domestic Violence Act contain discreet provisions on legal  aid. While the 2008 Constitution provides for legal aid by the State for  ‘serious  crimes,’  the  Maldives  has  yet  to  establish  a  proper  legal  aid  system, or a legal framework for the implementation of legal aid. Statute  does not enumerate on the types of ‘serious criminal cases mentioned in  the  Constitution,  though  guidelines  from  the  Attorney  General’s  Office  (AGO) list the crimes that qualify for free legal aid from the State. The  AGO  also  maintains  a  roster  of  lawyers  to  provide  fee  legal  aid  to  qualifying criminal defendants.27     F. AFGHANISTAN:    Afghanistan has a surprisingly rich history of defense lawyer and legal aid  regulation  dating back to the reign of Zahir Shah. The constitution of  Zahir  Shah,  enacted  on  1  October  1964  was  the  first  constitution  to  recognize  the  right  of  criminally  accused  persons  to  have  'defense  counsel'.  Shortly afterward in 1965 the first statutory provision for legal  aid was created in 1965. Similar laws governing defense lawyers and legal  aid were passed in 1972, 1987, 1997 and 1999 respectively.28        G. BHUTAN:    As the issue of legal aid is emerging in Bhutan, the office of the Attorney  General, Bhutan National Legal Institute and UNDP Bhutan have jointly  organized the 1st  International Symposium on Legal Aid in Bhutan on 27‐ 28 October 2014.    The  Constitution  of  the  Kingdom  of  Bhutan,  2008,  under  Article  9(6)  states  that  "  The  State  shall  endeavor  to  provide  legal  aid  to  secure  justice, which shall not be denied to any person by reason of economic  and other disabilities". Although the provision of the constitution do not  27 UNDP Maldives: Option for Legal Aid Program in the Maldives, Working Paper Series, at 5 http://www.af.undp.org/content/dam/maldives/docs/Democratic%20 Governance/ Final_ word_ doc%20- 20Legal%20Aid%20Options%20in%20the%20Maldives.pdf (Accessed 3 Sep.2016) 28 Sarah Han: Legal Aid in Afghanistan; Afghanistan Analysts Network, 2012, at 1, http:// www. afghanistan- analysts.org/wp- content/uploads/downloads/2012/09/legalaid.pdf at 3, (Accessed 3 Sep. 2016)
  16. 16. 16 directly  states  that  the  right  to  legal  aid  is  a  fundamental  right  but  a  holistic reading of Article 7(15),21 & Article 9(6) of the constitution along  with section 34 of Civil and Criminal Procedure Code imply that the right  to legal aid is a fundamental right.29      H. NEPAL:    In the context of Nepal the concept of legal aid was emerged only after  the Rana Regime. Nepal after being the member of UNO had ratified the  Manifesto  of  The  Universal  declaration  of  Human  Rights  and  also  has  been  ratifying  the  other  various  conventions  of  UNO.  The  first  democratic constitution of Nepal after the Rana Regime, Nepal Interim  Government Act, 2007 had no provision regarding right to be defended  by  counsel.  The  next  constitution  of  2015  on  its  article  3  Sub‐article  6  under  the  heading  of  Fundamental  Rights  declared  that  every  one  arrested will have right to take an advice and defended by counsel of his  choice.  In  addition  to  this,  the  system  of  Stipendiary  Lawyer  (Baitanik  Wakil)  was  also  done  in  2015  B.S  by  the  decision  of  the  full  court  (Pradhan Nyayalaya) 30 . Similar kind of provision was incorporate in sub‐  article 6 of article 11 of constitution of Nepal 2019. After the collapse of  the  thirty  years  long  party  less  rule  and  restoration  of  multiparty  democracy in 1990, As a result, the The constitution of the kingdom of  Nepal 1990 was promulgated as a fundamental law of the land, which was  far  more  progressive  than  all  the  past  constitutions31 .  Which  had  guaranteed  the  fundamental  right  of  the  people.  Along  with  this,  the  constitution  has  explicitly  mentioned  about  the  promotion  of  legal  aid  system, art 23(14) of the part IV of the constitution has given recognition  to  Legal Aid.  According  to  the  concept  of  Legal  Aid,  mentioned  in  the  preamble  of  the  constitution,  The  Legal  Aid  Act‐1997  and  Legal  Aid  Rules, 1998 were formulated and enacted.    Interim  constitution  of  Nepal  2063  (2007),  had  In  Article  24(10)  which  guaranteed legal aid as fundamental righ "Any incapable party shall have  the right to free legal aid, as provided in law."32  The constitution of Nepal  2015  in  the  article  20  (10)  has  guaranteed  the  Legal  Aid  right  as  the  29 Jamyang Sherab, Legal Aid in Bhutan, Background Paper for Legal Aid Symposium 27-28 October Terma Linca, Thimphu, Bhutan, http://www.unct.org.bt/legalaid/doc/ Background%20paper %20on%20Legal%20aid%20in%20 Bhutan %20 FINAL2.pdf (Accessed 3 Sep.2016) 30 Supra Note 17, at 1-11 31 Ibid, at 81 32 THE INTERIM CONSTITUTION OF NEPAL, ART 24 ( 2007)
  17. 17. 17 fundamental right as "Any indigent party shall have the right to free  legal aid in accordance with law"33     Access for justice for all is enhanced by availability of legal aid to pay for  legal representatives in all courts from the Supreme Court down to the  District courts in the country. The Nepal Bar Association was established  in December 21st 1956 but for the first time "Janakpur Bar Association"  had entered into an agreement to provide free legal assistance in the year  1986.     Norway  Cooperation  with  Nepal  started  since  1960's  and  formalized  in  1973.  The Norwegian  Bar Association as  a  member  of  International Bar  Association (IBA) was keen in cooperation with national bar associations.  The agreement of mutual cooperation between NBA & NEBA was signed  by  Mr.  Alf  Skogly  (NBA)  and  Mr.  Laxman  Prasad  Aryal  (NEBA)  on  27  september 1987. The agreement covered following major areas:    1. Legal Aid Scheme  2. Regular Publication of Nepal Bar Journal         (Nyayadoot)  3. Special measures to secure legal aid for woman,        and  4. Fellowship, seminars and study facilitation    The  collaboration  began  on  1st  January  1988  for  the  period  of  initial  5  years  and  renewed  time  again  up  to  2010‐2014  as  a  latest  renewal  collaboration. Nepal Bar Association with co‐operation with Norwegian  Bar  Association  (Twinning  co‐operation)  had  formally  launched  Legal  Aid  Programs  in  the  country.  During  this  25  years  period  ,  the  collaboration aimed at institutionalization of legal aid system, promotion  of  human  rights,  empowerment  of  the  people  in  legal  knowledge  and  increased access to justice. Central part of the endeavor under the project  remain as legal aid. The objective of the legal aid was to provide free legal  aid  to  the  weaker,  poorer  and  disadvantaged  section  of  the  society.  Woman  remained  as  key  target  groups  as  woman  in  Nepal  during  the  project  period  were  facing  problems  associated  with  illegal  abortion,  infant  killing,  hindrance  in  property  rights.  A  total  of  17143  cases  that  33 THE CONSTITUTION OF NEPAL, ART 20(10) (2015)
  18. 18. 18 were  in  the  courts  were  provided  with  the  legal  defense  and  other  services in the litigation. Form this 17,335 cases needy people benefited  among them 10,017 were woman.   In the beginning of the collaboration Legal aid was provided through the  project  central  office  and  branch  offices  in  33  districts,  which  were  transferred to the District Legal Aid Committee after the implementation  of  the  Legal  Aid  Act,1997  by  the  Government.  The  collaboration  continued  in  this  period  with  focus  on  institutionalization  of  legal  aid,  empowering  woman  lawyers  and  improving  accessibility  of  justice  at  present the collaboration is run as access to Justice 2010‐2014.34     THE  ORGANIZATION  STRUCTURE  OF  THE  LEGAL  AID  PROJECT:  The  organization  structure  of  the  Legal  Aid  Project  implemented  from  1988‐2009 was as follows.             34 Nepal Bar Association, Boosting Access to Justice for Needy People, Nepal Bar Association, Kathmandu, at 1-2, (2013)
  19. 19. 19 CHAPTER ‐III      3.  SOURCES OF LEGAL AID IN NEPAL:    There are mainly four basic sources of Legal Aid in Nepal, they are:      3.1.  GOVERNMENT OF NEPAL:      Government  of  Nepal  is  one  of  the  source  of  providing  Legal  Aid  in  Nepal. District Legal Aid Committees (DLACs) under the Legal Aid Act,  1997 are instrumental in providing legal aid in the country. DLACs had  been implemented by the Government in different phases as follows:    Table No.2  Different phases of Implementation of DLACs by the Government   Phase / Date of  Implementation  Name of DLACs  1st  ‐ 9 Nov., 1998  Sunsari, Dolkha, Bara, Palpa and Banke  2nd  ‐ 19 Feb,2000  Sarlahi, Dhading and Gulmi  3rd  ‐14 April 2004  Dhanusha, Makawanpur, Jhapa, Kaski, Kanchanpur  4th  ‐ 16 Dec, 2003  Parsa, Kavrepallanchowk, Morang, Syangja,Kailali,  Mahottari, Rupandhehi, Doti, Ilam and Dang  5th  ‐17 Dec, 2004  Rautahat, Sindhupallanchok, Saptari, Tanahu, Bardia,  Siraha, Kapilbastu, Darchula, Dhankuta and Surkhet  6th  ‐17 July, 2006  Panchthar, Udyapur, Sindhuli, Chitwan, Nawalparasi,  Baglung, Parwat, Ardhakhanchi, Pyuthan and  Dandeldhura  7th   ‐ 15 Jan, 2008  Taplejung, Bajhang, Nuwakot, Lamjunj, Myagdi,  Gorkha, Ramechhap, Jumla, Rolpa, Baitadi  8th  ‐2009  Similarly, the Legal Aid Program has taken a policy to  transform the established Legal Aid Offices in other 10  different districts into DLACs of the respective districts  to  the  Central  Legal  Aid  Committee  of  the  Nepal  Government in 2009.     At present:              There are 75 DLAC's established in all the 75 Districts    Source: Legal Aid Manual, Nepal Bar Association (2009)   
  20. 20. 20 Some strength and weaknesses of the legal aid by the Government can be  summarized as follows:    Table No.‐3  Analysis of some Strength and Weaknesses of the Legal Aid by the  Government  Strengths  Weaknesses    1.  Credibility‐  as  it  is  carried  with  the  view  to  translate  the  aspirations  of  the  constitution in practice.  1. Limited Scope    2. Sustainable  2. Unrealistic Ceiling for getting legal aid  3.  Biasness  ‐Difficulty  to  get  recommendation  from  local  bodies  due  to political biasness.  4.  Faulty  Composition  of  the  DLACs‐ Headed by Public Prosecutor.  5. Concept of Reimbursement‐ If legal aid is  provided  to  help  the  helpless  people  there  seems  no  rationale  to  reimburse  the expenses incurred for legal aid.  6. Nominal Fund of DLAC's  7.  Lack  of  Involvement  of  Experienced  Lawyers  8.  Inherent  Shortcoming  in  the  acts‐  It  is  not  an  umbrella  act,  faulty  composition  of  committees,  ceiling  and  reimbursement  etc.  provisions  seems  impractical and unrealistic.      3.2.  COURTS:    There  are  there  tiers  of  courts  in  Nepal,  they  are  Supreme  Court‐1,  Appellate courts‐16 and District courts 75. Supreme court of Nepal is the  apex  court  having  jurisdiction  as  the  court  of  record.  All  the  courts  provide legal aid through Stipendiary Lawyer (Vaitanik wakil)     The provisions related to the Stipendiary lawyer are incorporated in the  Rules of various courts, for example in the Supreme Court Rules, 1992, 
  21. 21. 21 Appellate Court Rules, 1991 and District Court Rules, 1995. Rule 111(A) of  the Supreme Court Rules 199235 ,  provides on legal aid. It has authorized  the  Registrar  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Nepal  to  appoint  a  stipendiary  lawyer  from  among  the  advocates  through  a  fair  competition.  The  stipendiary  lawyer  is  required  to  work  in  the  legal  aid  section  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Nepal.  The  Supreme  Court  provides  legal  aid  in  the  cases in which the party of a case is helpless, unable, children, poor or  prisoner who is not able to afford a private lawyer.     The decision on providing legal aid in a case is taken either by the Chief  Justice,  concerned  Bench  or  by  the  Registrar.  When  a  litigant  applies  either before the Chief Justice or concerned Bench or the Registrar, each  of them can take decision at his / her satisfaction that there is a need to  provide legal aid to the applicant. In such cases, the stipendiary lawyers  provide legal aid including preparation of necessary legal documents and  pleading before the Bench.    The stipendiary lawyer is expected to fulfill all the rules of the code of  conduct  applicable  to  other  practicing  lawyers.  He  /  she  is  provided  salary as prescribed by the Nepal Government. However, he / she can be  reappointed. Generally the office of the Registrar of the Supreme Court  publishes  a  notice  in  the  Notice  Board  of  the  Supreme  Court  and  the  Nepal  Bar  Association  and  calls  for  the  application  for  the  post  of  the  Stipendiary  from  the  interested  persons  holding  a  license  of  Advocate.  Seniority and the less working load of the applicant are considered the  most important criteria for the appointment of the Stipendiary.    Generally  women  applicants  are  given  preference  while  appointing  the  Stipendiary  in  practice.  The  Stipendiary  has  to  submit  the  report  of  his/her work along with the difficulties he/she faced while providing legal  aid and his/her recommendations if any to the court every month. But  this rule has not been applied in most of the cases.    There are similar provisions on the stipendiary lawyer in Appellate Court  Rules and District Court Rules. Rules 105(A) of the Appellate Court Rules,  199136  and Rules 95 (A) of the District Court Rules, 199537  provide similar  provisions to the Supreme Court Rules on legal aid. As prescribed by the  35 Supreme Court Rules Rule 111(A) , (1992) 36 Appellate Court Rules, Rules 105(A), (1991) 37 District Court Rules, Rules 95 (A), (1995)
  22. 22. 22 Rules,  both  the  District  Courts  and  Appellate  Courts  have  a  legal  aid  section  in  each  court.  Both  Rules  prescribe  that  the  stipendiary  lawyer  will be appointed among the applicant advocates available.   If advocates are not available in such situation stipendiary lawyer will be  appointed among the applicant pleaders.    The  conditions  for  providing  legal  aid  under  the  Supreme  Court  Rules  and the District Court and Appellate Court Rules are similar. Under the  Appellate  Court  Rules  the  decision  will  be  taken  either  by  the  Chief  Judge, concerned Bench or by the Registrar. In the District Court either a  Judge or the Chief Judicial Officer (Shrestedar) decides on providing legal  aid.    Presently  there  are  two  stipendiary  lawyers  in  the  Supreme  Court,  one  stipendiary  lawyer  in  each  Appellate  Court  and  one  in  each  District  Court.   At the beginning the stipendiary lawyers were paid 100.00 NRs. and this  remuneration was equal to the Section Officer. Later, the remuneration  was increased to 400 NRs, which was also equal to the Section Officer.  Until  Aug.  1999  they  were  paid  NRs1000,  later  which  was  increased  to  NRs. 2000 per month. Recent remuneration of the stipendiary lawyer of  Supreme court is equivalent to the Nepal Government Under Secretary  and Stipendiary Lawyer of Appeal and District court's equivalent to the  Nepal Government's Section Officer. At present the Stipendiary Lawyer  appointed in various courts of Nepal is given in the annex‐3      The duty of the stipendiary lawyer according to these various Rules is to  provide  legal  aid  to  the  helpless,  unable,  poor,  children  and  prisoner  litigants as directed or prescribed by the court. However the Rules have  not defined and also developed standards so that the helpless, unable and  poor persons who are litigant in a case could be objectively identified and  need legal aid could be provided to them. So, generally the courts reach  to a decision on legal aid on the basis of their satisfaction.    Also,  there  is  no  uniform  and  established  system  and  practice  on  appointment  of  the  stipendiary  lawyer.  In  some  courts,  the  stipendiary  lawyer is appointed on the recommendation of Bar Association, in some  courts  he  /  she  is  appointed  through  an  open  competition  including 
  23. 23. 23 carrying written examination and interview and in some cases he / she is  appointed merely by the decision of the concerned authority.38     Though the system of Stipendiary Lawyer was initiated since the time of  establishment of full court in the year 2015, to provide free legal counsel  for the indigent people. It's high time to undertake an assessment of the  impact and utility of Vaitanik Wakil System. Vaitanik Wakil have been  providing free legal counsel to the indigent people of the country. They  are facing some problems mentioned below, due to which they are not  able to provide qualitative and efficient service to the targeted people for  the free legal aid.39      1. Appointment  of  Stipendiary  Lawyer  with  the  defendant  is  lacking  so  they  may  not  demand  appropriate  justice  for  the  defendant  2. Cumbersome procedures of judicial administration    3. Due to incurring high expenses in Legal Services and the cases  of people, which are handled by Stipendiary Lawyer, are poor  and indigent people so they may not get absolute justice.   4. Stipendiary  Lawyer  have  to  handle  difficult  and  unnecessary  cases  5. Lack  of  time  for  the  study  of  cases  and  getting  sufficient  information  6. Due  to  appointment  of  a  new  Stipendiary  Lawyer  for  a  short  period, it takes more time to provide justice to the concerned  party   7. Though the new remuneration of the Stipendiary Lawyer seems  reasonable but due to the short term appointment they may not  be  motivated  and  dedicated  to  their  work,  so  the  concerned  party will not get efficient and qualitative service.    The limitation of Stipendiary Lawyer :40      1. Unspecific knowledge about the specified subject  2. Unable to do anything before filing of the cases  38 Dr. Surendra Bhandari & Buddhi Karki ,Study of the Current Legal Aid System in Nepal, ARD ROL, Lalitpur , at 23-24 (2005) 39 Ruku K.C. (Thapa), The problems and challenges of Vaitanik Wakil, KANUN, Vol 17, at 62 (1995) 40 Kalyan Shrestha, The Concept of Legal Aid and its use in Nepal, KANUN , Vol 25, at 47 (1998)
  24. 24. 24 3. Due to short time period of appointment and appointing another  Stipendiary Lawyer only by the decision of the court, there may be  discontinuity or gap in the service of Stipendiary Lawyer.      Some  strength  and  weaknesses  of  the  legal  aid  by  court  can  be  summarized as follows:          Table No.‐4  Analysis of some Strength and Weaknesses of the Legal Aid by the Court  Strengths  Weaknesses    1. Institutionalized form and character  1.    Less  qualitative  Service  by  the  incompetent stipendiary lawyer.  2. Sustainable (Continuous  appointment of Stipendiary Lawyer  in various courts and allocation of  budget by the government)    2.  Inadequate  Preparation  by  the  Stipendiary Lawyer  3. Easily Accessible   3.  Relation  between  Stipendiary  Lawyer  and  client  having  legal  aid  don't  have  much interactions in most of the cases   3. Wide Coverage 93 Stipendiary  Lawyer appointed in all tiers of  courts   4. Very formal relation between court and  the  stipendiary  lawyer  and  Lack  of  Monitoring their work by the court.      3.2.1   LEGAL ASSISTANCE & REPRESENTATIONS OF STIPENDIARY  LAWYER'S IN DIFFERENT COURTS:    The information about legal assistance and legal representation provided  by  the  Stipendiary  Lawyer  in  Various Court's  have  been  collected  from  the available Annual Reports of Supreme courts from the fiscal year 2064‐ 065 upto 2071‐072 which has been tabulated as follows:                   
  25. 25. 25 Table No.‐5  Legal aid and Representations Report related to   Stipendiary Lawyer from fiscal year 2064‐065 upto 2070‐071  Fiscal Year 2064‐065  S.N.  Name of Court  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer              Detained in  custody  Other  Total  1  Supreme Court   18564  162  45  207  2  Appellate Court  18342  115  80  195  3  District Courts  63721  686  315  1001     Total  100627  963  440  1403    Fiscal year 2065‐066  S.N.  Name of  Court  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer  Detained in  custody  Other  Total  1  Supreme Court  17961  78  1  79  2  Appellate  Court  20288  172  77  249  3  District Courts  75048  672  415  1087  Total  113297  922  493  1415  Fiscal year 2066‐067  S.N.  Name of  Court  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer  Detained in  custody  Other  Total  1  Supreme Court  17354  141  205  346  2  Appellate  Court  20435  133  80  213  3  District Courts  80696  783  689  1472  Total  118485  1057  974  2031  Fiscal year 2067‐068  S.N.  Name of  Court  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer  Detained in  custody  Other  Total  1  Supreme Court  17892  180  93  273  2  Appellate  Court  23234  180  186  366  3  District Courts  87795  931  733  1664  Total  128921  1291  1012  2303 
  26. 26. 26 Fiscal year 2068‐069  S.N.  Name of Court  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer  Detained in  custody  Other  Total  1  Supreme Court  19053  229  93  322  2  Appellate Court  27961  204  138  342  3  District Courts  96424  1133  497  1630  Total  143438  1566  728  2294  Fiscal year 2069‐070  S.N.  Name of Court  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer  Detained in  custody  Other  Total  1  Supreme Court  20811  375  100  475  2  Appellate Court  31507  446  234  680  3  District Courts  102881  1343  932  2275  Total  155199  2164  1266  3430  Fiscal year 2070‐071  S.N.  Name of Court  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer  Detained in  custody  Other  Total  1  Supreme Court  24735  368  274  642  2  Appellate Court  41852  458  197  655  3  District Courts  110629  1710  827  2537  Total  177216  2536  1298  3834  Source: Supreme Court Annual Reports from f/y 2064‐065 to 2070‐071  (2016)    The  above  table  of  Legal  aid  and  Representations  Report  related  to  Stipendiary Lawyer's from fiscal year 2064‐065 up to 2070‐071 shows that  the during this period; the number of recorded cases and cases in which  legal  aid  and  representations  provided  by  the  Stipendiary  Lawyer  have  been increased considerably. The cases of detained in custody is found  higher in all these years.             
  27. 27. 27 Table No.‐6  Legal aid and Representations Report related to  Stipendiary Lawyer fiscal year 2071‐072  Fiscal year 2071‐072  S.N.     Name of  Court        Drafting   Cases in which Legal service and  works provided by Stipendiary Lawyer  Counselling  Service  Witness/  cross  Examination  Pleading  Attendance  (Tarikh)  Jail  Visit  1  Supreme  Court   25  21  0  167  0  0  2  Appellate  Court  217  795  10  1026  0  415  3  District Courts  1527  3473  949  2728  74  1742     Total  1769  4289  959  3921  74  2157  Source: Supreme Court Annual Reports from (2016)    The  above  table  reveals  that  in  this  period  the  stipendiary  lawyer  has  accomplished 1769 number of drafting work, 4289 number of counseling  service,  959    witness  cross  examination,  3291  number  of  litigation,  74  attendance (tarikh taken) and 2157 times of Jail visit in all the different  courts. Since this year the report shows that the services provided by the  Stipendiary Lawyer has been increased considerably in comparison to the  previous years.     Table No.‐7  Summary of Stipendiary Lawyer's Legal Assistance and Representation in  all the courts from fiscal year 2064‐065 up to 2071‐072       S.N.     Fiscal  Year   Report related to Stipendiary Lawyer's legal aid  /Representations from Fiscal year 2064‐065 to  2070‐071  Total  recorded  cases  Cases in which Legal Aid /  Representation provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer        Cases of  detention in  Custody  Other  Total  1  2064/065  100627  963  440  1403  2  2065/066  113297  922  493  1415  3  2066/067  118485  1057  974  2031  4  2067/068  128921  1291  1012  2303  5  2068/069  143438  1566  728  2294  6  2069/070  155199  2164  1266  3430 
  28. 28. 28 7  2070/071  177216  2536  1298  3834     Total  937183  10499  6211  16710    Source: Supreme Court Annual Reports from f/y 2064‐065 to 2070‐071 (2016)    The  above  summary  table  reveals  that  total  recorded  cases  have  been  found increased considerably form fiscal year 2064‐065 to 2070‐071 and  the Legal aid and Representations Report related to Stipendiary Lawyer  shows that the during this period; legal aid and representations provided  by  the  Stipendiary  Lawyer  have  been  also  increased  considerably.  The  cases of detained in custody is found higher in all through these years.      Table No.‐8  Report related to Stipendiary Lawyer's Legal Assistance and  Representation provided in all the courts in fiscal year 2071‐072    S.N  Fiscal  Year  Drafting  Cases in which Legal service and works provided by  Stipendiary Lawyer        Counselling  Service   Witness/  cross   Examination  Pleading  Attendance  (Tarekh)  Jail  Visit     2071‐072  1769  4289  959  3921  74  2157  Source: Supreme Court Annual Reports (2016)    The  above  table  reveals  that  in  this  period  the  stipendiary  lawyer  has  accomplished 1769 number of drafting work, 4289 number of counseling  service,  959    witness  cross  examination,  3291  number  of  litigation,  74  attendance (tarikh taken) and 2157 times of Jail visit in all the different  courts. This has been also analysed in the table no.6.       3.2.2  MAJOR  SUGGESTION  PROVIDED  TO  THE  REGISTRAR  BY  THE STIPENDIARY LAWYER OF SUPREME COURT OF NEPAL  IN THEIR MONTHLY PROGRESS REPORT AVAILABLE FROM  2072 SHRAWAN TO 2073 BAISAKH IN ACCORDANCE TO THE  SUPREME  COURT  RULES,  1992,  RULE  111(a)(9)  ARE  AS  FOLLOWS:     1. Among the cases in which service provided by the stipendiary  lawyers, the cases of custody seems higher than the other cases  and in some cases forwarded with suggestion from district and 
  29. 29. 29 appeal courts should be separated and send to the bench for for  the quick hearing.     2. The cases of detention should be given higher priority than the  other  cases  and  send  to  the  bench  for  quick  and  continuous  hearings.    3. The  work  load  of  the  stipendiary  lawyer  of  Supreme  Court  seems  higher  on  the  basis  of  cases,  so  an  assistant  should  be  provided for their help to increase efficiency.    4. The proper and on time information has to be provided to the  the stipendiary lawyer from the concerned sections about and  after  the  appointment  of  the  Stipendiary  Lawyer  and  the  appointment of other Legal professionals; So it is requested to  provide directions to the concerned sections for so and it is felt  that  in  the  cases  appointed  with  other  legal  professional  appointed;  it  has  been  felt  that  the  bench  has  also  given  less  priority in litigation to the stipendiary lawyer.    5. The  stipendiary  lawyer  has  reminded  to  the  registrar  for  non  implementation of the the suggestions provided repetitively in  the previous reports.    The  above  suggestions  provided  by  the  Stipendiary  Lawyers  of  the  supreme court in their monthly reports; it has been observed that they  have been providing almost the same suggestions repetitively more than  half  of  the  whole  year  and  reminding  for  the  non  implementations  of  such  suggestions  to  the  registrar.  Thus  the  passive  aspects  of  the  Stipendiary Lawyer system have been easily understood.      3.3  BAR ASSOCIATION:    Nepal Bar Association is another important source of Legal Aid in Nepal.  It has its organizations in all the courts of Nepal and provides Legal Aid  in  support  of  different  partners  mainly  Norwegian  Bar  Association  and  European Commission founded Legal Aid Projects.     
  30. 30. 30 Access to Justice (A to J) Project is one of the main programs of the Nepal  Bar Association, based on an agreement between Nepal Bar Association  (NEBA) and Norwegian Bar Association (NBA). NEBA is engaged in social  welfare activities, in collaboration with NBA, in favor of needy women,  children  and  people  of  underprivileged  community  since  1988  through  Legal Aid Project, it has renewed the project as Access to Justice Project.  The A to J Project is implemented in Nepal since 1st January, 2010 in co‐ operation with the Norwegian Bar Association and with the funding of  NORAD.41     A.   Objectives of A to J Project:     The objectives of the project are as follows:  1.   To strengthen the concept of Rule of Law & Legal Aid in Nepal.  2.  To enable access to justice of targeted persons/groups.  3.  To protect human rights by intervening policy making bodies of the  government.  4.  To provide professional training to staffs of District Legal Aid  Committees and Rosters of  Lawyers to enhance their capacity.  5.    To enhance legal education through the development of school level  curriculum.  6.    To provide legal aid for Women, Dalit, Janajati, Madheshi and other  marginalized community.  7.    To carry out advocacy and awareness programs for Women,  Children, Dalit, Janajati, Madheshi and marginalized community's  rights.  8.    To lobby for enactment of new laws relating Human Rights.      B.   Target Groups or Beneficiaries of A to J Project:    The principal  target  groups  of  the  Project  are:  all  poor  and  indigent  Nepali people  including  Women  and  Children, Dalit,  Janajati,  41 Nepal Bar Association, Url:http://www.nepalbar.org/projects/NEBA-AJP.php (16 April 2015)
  31. 31. 31 Madheshiand marginalized community who cannot afford legal counsel  cost.    The achievements and various activities of Nepal Bar Association's Legal  Aid Project throughout the country for the promotion of Legal Aid and  Legal  Literacy  from  its  establishment  since  1988  upto  2012  can  be  tabulated as and summarized as follows:    Table No.‐9      ACCOMPLISHMENTS  &  PROGRESS  REPORT  OF  LEGAL  AID  PROJECT:  Progress Chart from 1988 to 2012  Nepal Bar Association, Legal Aid Project ‐ Legal Aid in Litigation Cases  Year  Cases  Counseling  Legal   Seminars  Publication   Dissimination  of IEC  Booklets  Paralegal  Jail  Legal   Literacy   of  Nayadoot  Training  Visit  Education  1988  27  3  6  ‐  3  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  1989  54  7  14  ‐  5  10,000  ‐  ‐  ‐  1990  239  15  102  ‐  6  3,000  ‐  ‐  ‐  1991  531  1032  128  3  6  20,000  ‐  ‐  ‐  1992  349  793  334  6  6  10,000  3  2  45  1993  454  297  269  3  5  22,500  8  8  13  1994  908  552  199  6  7  21,000  10  ‐  147  1995  744  832  248  3  7  34,500  7  ‐  40  1996  892  687  214  3  7  40,000  7  5  83  1997  923  892  184  2  7    5  7  17  1998  428  964  308  4  7  20,000  6  ‐  51  1999  658  440  421  3  7  7,500  17  1  92  2000  855  466  407  4  7  18,443  8  7  109  2001  538  400  267  4  7    6  3  56  2002  534  412  389  5  7    13  5  110  2003  1232  848  344  4  7    8  7  136  2004  1039  1011  182  4  7  ‐  3  9  40  2005  1333  714  238  4  7  ‐  8  28  88  2006  1686  762  263  4  7  ‐  8    92  2007  1193  871  188  5  4  15,000  8  45  100  2008  799  621  279  4  8  ‐  11  54  72  2009  1078    128        1    57  2010  64    356        24    16  2011  141            26      2012  184            8      TOTAL  17,143  12,619  5,218  71  134  221,943  195  181  1,364  Source:  NEBA, 2013   The above table shows that, in this period from 1988‐2012 the project has provided  Legal Aid in total 17,143 number of cases, 12,619 number of counseling, 5,218 Legal  Literacy  Programs,  71  seminars,  134  issues  of  publication  of  NYAYADOOT,  dissemination about 2,22,000 booklets, 195 Para‐legal Training, 181 Jail visits and 1364   legal education program have been conducted by the project.  
  32. 32. 32 E.   PUBLICATION OF LEGAL AID MANUAL:42     Though the Legal Aid program has implemented more than 20 years but  there  were  no  any  manual  formulated.  So  it  was  felt  to  formulate  an  extensive manual to increase the efficiency of especially new Lawyers and  legal practitioners working in the legal aid field and to preserve the legal  rights of the indigent people of the country. The Legal Aid Manual has  been  formulated  and  published  in  the  year  2009  as  a    joint  venture  between the Nepal Bar Association under the  European Union's Conflict  Mitigation Programme II.    CHAPTER‐1  (Legal  Skills  and  Practices):  Guidelines  for  Handling  Legal  Aid  Cases,  Code  of  Conduct,  Introduction  to  Legal  Aid  in  Nepal  etc.;  CHAPTER‐2:Civil  Cases;  CHAPTER‐3:Specific  Criminal  Cases  (Crimes  against Life &Human Welfare); CHAPTER‐4:Crimes against Women and  Children;  CHAPTER‐5:  Other  Crimes;  CHAPTER‐6:  Family  Cases;  CHAPTER‐7:Procedures; CHAPTER‐8:  Registration  of  Personal  Events;  CHAPTER‐9:  Writs  and  Injunctions;  CHAPTER‐10:Alternative  Dispute  Resolution  ‐  ADR;  CHAPTER  11:IT  Based  Legal  Research  and  CHAPTER‐12: Miscellaneous    Access  to  justice  is  crucial  and  basic  human  rights,  which  enables  individuals  to  assert  and  protect  many  other  human  rights.  The  Legal  profession  has  a  crucial  role  to  play  in  ensuring  Access  to  Justice  by  providing legal services (legal information, legal advice, legal assistance  for  handling  administrative  matters  and  court  cases).  Individuals  of  limited  means,  who  are  not  able  to  pay  for  legal  services  particularly  members of disadvantaged, vulnerable and marginalized groups, require  special  institutional  mechanism  and  services  to  ensure  their  access  to  justice. This includes legal aid and Pro Bono Publico legal services.    The legal aid system must provide  1) adequate coverage that reaches all  appropriate target groups and 2) quality services. Coverage depends upon  effective  delivery  of  legal  services  to  all  interested  parties  by  providers  (institutions) that are well managed and have qualified staff. Quality is  mostly  a  function  of  the  legal  services  provided  by  Lawyers  and  other  members of the legal profession. However it also depends greatly upon  the operations and management of providers that organize the delivery  42 Nepal Bar Association, Legal Aid Manual, Nepal Bar Association, Kathmandu, (2009)
  33. 33. 33 of  legal  services.  Both  coverage  and  quality  depend  upon  sufficient  financing, without which no system can function optimally.43       Some  strength  and  weaknesses  of  the  legal  aid  by  the  Bar  can  be  summarized as follows:    Table No.‐10  Analysis of some Strength and Weaknesses of the Legal Aid by the NEBA    Strengths  Weaknesses    1. Organized and Professional  1. Lack of Sustainability  2. Implementer of the Legal Aid Act‐  Secretariat of CLAC & DLAC  2. Lack of Seriousness in the Legal Aid  Cases by the Lawyers  3. Lack of strong system of monitoring       3.4  CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATIONS    Civil  Society  movement  in  Nepal  started  and  grew  after  restoration  of  democracy in 1990. Democracy offered opportunities to the civil society  organizations  to  involve  in  different  developmental  activities  in  the  country as an important part of society. The civil society organizations  have been widely expanded on different disciplines in the society. Legal  discipline, as one of the fighters of democracy and vanguard of the civil  rights in the country became a part of the civil society movement in the  country since the early days of 1990. Many civil society organizations are  working  in  the  areas  of  justice,  human  rights,  legal  aid  and  other  important  areas  of  law  but  most  of  such  civil  society  organizations  is  excessively dependent to the donors. However the legal aid by the civil  society  organization  is  day  by  day  being  reliable  and  popular  in  the  society and they are actively working in community level also.44     There are different Civil Society Organizations that have been providing  Legal  Aid  in  different  parts  of  the  country,  especially  in  support  and  partnership  of  various  donar  agencies.  Some  major  civil  society  organizations working in the legal aid are,   43 Supranote 28, at 3 44 Supra Note, 18, at 34-35
  34. 34. 34   • Legal Aid Consultancy Center (LACC)  • Center for Legal Research and Resource Development (CeLRRd)  • Center for Victim of Torture Nepal (CVICT)  • Advocacy Forum  • Central Woman Legal Aid Committee (CWLAC)  • Law Associates Nepal etc.    Some  strength  and  weaknesses  of  the  legal  aid  by  civil  society  organization can be summarized as follows:    Table No.‐11  Analysis of some Strength and Weaknesses of the Legal Aid by Civil  Societies    Strengths  Weaknesses    1.  Holistic  approach  to  legal  aid  (they  provide  complete  package  of  Legal  Aid  from  counseling  to  defending  and to implementation of a case)  1. Urban area centered  2.      Effective‐  Competent  and  professional legal aid lawyer  2. Donor Led  3.      Specialized  Service‐  Involved  in  specific areas   3. Lack of Co‐ordination  4.  Prompt  service  &  Strong  Network,  Familiar with local conditions  4. Underused by the targeted group  5.  Financial  Constrains  ,  Implementation  constraints  and  populist, Negative public perception.      3.5   INDIVIDUAL LAWYER & PRO BONO LEGAL SERVICES     Individual  Lawyer  have  also  been  providing  legal  aid  to  the  poor,  vulnerable, marginalized, minors and women in their personal capacity.  Not  all  the  Lawyers  but  only  few  of  them  are  providing  free  legal  aid.  Which is an appreciable initiative. Moreover Legal Aid by Private Lawyer  is completely subject to their wish and pleasure.45   45 Georgetown University Law Center, Url:https://www.law.georgetown.edu/careers/opics/pro-bono/what_is_pro_bono, at 1 ( Access date 4 Sep. 2016)
  35. 35. 35 'Pro bono' is a key source of legal assistance for the disadvantaged in the  absence of an adequately founded legal aid system. The term "pro bono,"  which is short for pro bono publico, is a Latin term that means "for the  public  good."  Although  the  term  is  used  in  different  contexts  to  mean  "the offering of free services," it has a very specific meaning to those in  the  legal  profession.  Rule  6.1  of  the American  Bar  Association's  Model  Rules  of  Professional  Conduct,  lays  out  the  obligation  of  attorneys  to  engage  in  pro  bono.  " Every  lawyer  has  a  professional  responsibility  to  provide legal services to those unable to pay. A lawyer should aspire to  render at least (50) hours of pro bono publico legal services per year.     In  Australia,  the  USA,  the  UK,  South  Korea  and  and  other  countries,  there has been, in recent years, an explosion of interest in the provision  of free legal services by lawyers. This interest has been developed under  the label of  Pro bono publico ( Literally 'for the publice good') or 'pro  bono' for short.     Pro bono legal services interact with and promote the public interest in  two  ways.  First,  it  is  the  public  interest  that  low  income  and  disadvantaged people have greater access to legal services. Second , much  pro  bono  legal  service  provision  relates  to  matters  that  have  a  public  interest quality.46     Pro  bono  legal  aid  work  has  been  part  of  the  tradition  of  the  legal  profession  in  many  countries  ‐developed  and  developing.  However  although pro bono work may supplement state founded legal aid services  the modern view is that it should not be regarded as a substitute for legal  aid schemes that pay for the services of lawyers. For instance in the UK ,  USA  and  France  pro  bono  work  has  been  done  for  many  years.  In  developing  countries  like  South  Africa,  There  has  been  a  tradition  of  Lawyers doing some pro bono work but this has not been mandatory in  many countries including Nepal but some countries have made pro bono  work compulsory for members of the legal profession.47     46 Jill Anderson and Gordon Renouf, "Legal Services for the Public Good", ALTERNATIVE LAW JOURNAL,Vol.28, No.1 (Feb. 2003), http://probonocentre.org.au/wp-content/uploads/ 2015/09/ forpublicgood.pdf, (4 Sept, 2016) 47 Supranote 13, at 457
  36. 36. 36 CHAPTER‐ IV       LEGISLATIVE MEASURES FOR LEGAL AID IN NEPAL       4.1   CONSTITUTIONS BEFORE 1990:     Constitution is regarded as the mirror of socio‐economic structure of the  country. Embodying, the national development and cultural up‐liftment,  constitution  draws  the  general  calculation  about  the  tools,  ideas  and  methods  to  attain  cherished  constitutional  goal  as  socio‐economic  justice. Law is the means to social ends and every part of it has constantly  to be examined for its purposes and effort and to be judged in the light of  both and their relation to each other.    The first democratic constitution of Nepal after the Rana Regime, Nepal  Interim  Government  Act,  2007  had  no  provision  regarding  right  to  be  defended by counsel. The next constitution of 2015 on its article 3 Sub‐ article  6  under  the  heading  of  Fundamental  Rights  declared  that  every  one arrested will have right to take an advice and defended by counsel of  his choice. Similar kind of provision was incorporate in sub‐ article 6 of  article 11 of constitution of Nepal 2019.      4.2   CONSTITUTIONS AFTER 1990:     4.2.1   CONSTITUTION OF THE KINGDOM OF NEPAL, 1990    After the thirty years long party less rule collapsed under the weight of  popular discontent. As a result, the constitution of the kingdom of Nepal  1990 promulgated as a fundamental law of the land. The constitution had  guaranteed the fundamental right of the people in Article 11(1) which had  also guaranteed both the right to be “ Equal before the law”  and the right  to “ Equal protection of the laws.”     The  preamble  of  the  constitution  of  the  Kingdom  of  Nepal,  1990  had  promised  justice  to  all  citizens  and  broadly  divides  “Justice”  into  three  basic  categories.  Social  justice  implies  that  all  citizens  must  be  treated  equally, irrespective of their status in society as a result of a accident of 
  37. 37. 37 birth  (which  determine  race,  caste,  religion,  sex,  title,  and  so  no).  Economic  justice  requires  that  rich  and  poor  people  are  to  be  treated  alike and that efforts are made to bridge any gaps between them. Political  justice entitles all citizens to an equal share in the right to participation  in  the  political  process  without  any  distinction  of  race,  cast,  creed,  religion or place of birth.48 .     Along  with  this,  the  constitution  had  explicitly  mentioned  about  the  promotion  of  legal  aid  system.  Art  26(14)  of  the  part  IV  of  the  constitution  had  given  recognition  to  legal  aid.  It  obliges  the  state  to  pursue a policy of providing free legal aid to indigents persons. However,  this provision is simply a direction to the state. No one can go to court in  order  to  enforce  this  right.  Besides,  the  Legal  Aid  Act  2054  had  been  enacted in this regard.       4.2.2 INTERIM CONSTITUTION OF NEPAL, 2007    The Interim Constitution of Nepal 2063 (2007) under part 3 (Fundamental  Rights) in article 24 (1‐10) the following rights relation to justice and in  sub‐article 10 free legal aid has been stated as a constitutional rights as"  Any incapable party shall have the right to free legal aid, as provided in  law."     These constitutional provisions regarding legal aid provides the policy of  the state to secure justice for all by pursuing a policy of providing free legal  aid to indigent persons for their legal representation in keeping with the  principle of the rule of Law.       4.2.3   CONSTITUTION OF THE KINGDOM OF NEPAL, 2015    In Part‐3 of the constitution of Nepal 2015 has guaranteed fundamental  rights from articles 16 to articles 46 and Duties of the Citizens in article  48. Some important such fundamental rights are art 16‐ Right to live with  dignity, art 17‐ Right to freedom, art 18‐ Right to equality, art 20‐Rights  relating  to  justice,  art  24‐  Right  against  untouchability  and  48 Surya P.S. Dhungel & Murgatroyd Chirs et. all, Commentary on the Nepalese constitution, DeLF, Lawyer's Inc., Kathmandu. P.52 (1998)
  38. 38. 38 discrimination, art 26‐ Right to freedom of religion, art 29‐Right against  exploitation, art 31‐ Right relating to education, art 32‐Right to language  and culture, art 40‐ Rights of Dalit, art 42‐ Right to social justice, art 43‐  Right to social security    In Article18: Right to equality: All citizens shall be equal before law. No  person shall be denied the equal protection of law and no discrimination  shall  be  made  in  the  application  of  general  laws  on  grounds  of  origin,  religion,  race,  caste,  tribe,  sex,  physical  condition,  condition  of  health,  marital  status,  pregnancy,  economic  condition,  language  or  region,  ideology  or  on  similar  other  grounds.  The  State  shall  not  discriminate  citizens  on  grounds of origin,  religion,  race,  caste,  tribe,  sex,  economic  condition, language, region, ideology  or on similar other grounds.    In Article 20 (10) Rights Relating to Justice: "Any indigent party shall have  the right to free legal aid in accordance with law".    20. Rights relating to justice:     (1)  No person shall be detained in custody without informing him or her  of the ground for his or her arrest.    (2)  Any  person  who  is  arrested  shall  have  the  right  to  consult  a  legal  practitioner of his or her choice from the time of such arrest and to  be  defended  by  such  legal  practitioner.  Any  consultation  made  by  such person with, and advice given by, his or her legal practitioner  shall be confidential. Provided this clause shall not apply to a citizen  of an enemy state.     (3) Any person who is arrested shall be produced before the adjudicating  authority  within  a  period  of  twenty‐four  hours  of  such  arrest,  excluding the time necessary for the journey from the place of arrest  to  such  authority;  and  any  such  person  shall  not  be  detained  in  custody  except  on  the  order  of  such  authority.  Provided  that  this  clause shall not apply to a person held in preventive detention and to  a citizen of an enemy state.    (4)  No person shall be liable for punishment for an act which was not  punishable by the law in force when the act was committed nor shall 
  39. 39. 39 any person be subjected to a punishment greater than that prescribed  by the law in force at the time of the commission of the offence.    (5)  Every  person  charged  with  an  offence  shall  be  presumed  innocent  until proved guilty of the offence.    (6)  No person shall be tried and punished for the same offence in a court  more than once.    (7)  No  person  charged  with  an  offence  shall  be  compelled  to  testify  against himself or herself.    (8)  Every person shall have the right to be informed of any proceedings  taken against him or her.    (9)  Every person shall  have  the  right  to  a  fair  trial  by  an  independent,  impartial and competent court or judicial body.    (10) Any indigent party shall have the right to free legal aid in accordance  with law.49       4.3  LEGAL AID ACT, 199750     Preamble  of  Legal  Aid  Act:  Whereas,  it  is  expedient  to  make  legal  provisions regarding legal aid for those persons who are unable to protect  their legal rights due to financial and social reasons to provide for equal  justice to all according to the Principle of Rule of Law.    Sec.2‐Definitions  (a)    "Legal  Aid"  means  Legal  Aid  to  the  indigent  person under this Act and the term also includes counseling and other  legal  services  such  as  correspondence  pleadings,  preparation  of  legal  documents and proceedings in the courts or offices on behalf of indigent  person.          49 THE CONSTITUTION OF NEPAL, (2015) 50 Legal Aid Act, (1997)
  40. 40. 40 Sec 3. Person authorized for Legal Aid:     (1) A person having less than the specified annual income shall only be  entitled to Legal Aid under this Act.    (2) The Concerned Committee shall be authorized to grant or deny Legal  Aid to a particular person.    (3) The Concerned Committee while deciding for Legal Aid shall consider  and  discourage  unnecessary  harassment  to  other  and  tendency  towards litigation on baseless ground.    Sec.4. Reimbursement of the expenses of Legal Aid:     (1) A Party in Legal Aid has to reimburse the expenses of the concerned  committee  as  prescribed  to  the  Committee  if  he/she  receives  any  property  or  economic  gain  in  consequences  of  receiving  Legal  Aid.  Provided that, if it is found unfair to the party for reimbursement, the  concerned committee shall waive partially or fully the expenses to the  party.    (2)The  court  in  its  order  may  direct  the  party  in  litigation  for  reimbursement  of  expenses  to  the  concerned  committee  on  the  expenses  made  in  course  of  legal  aid  and  such  direction  shall  be  implemented in accordance with prevailing laws.      Sec  6.  Constitution,  functions, duties and  powers of central  Legal  Aid Committee:    (1)  A  Central  Legal  Aid  Committee  shall  be  constituted  for  making  necessary arrangements to provide legal aid to the indigent person and  the committee shall comprised of the following members:   
  41. 41. 41 (a) Law and Justice Minister            ‐ Chairman  (b) Chairperson, Nepal Bar Council        ‐ Member  (c) President, Nepal Bar Association        ‐ Member  (d) One Legal expert nominated from Central Committee ‐ Member  (e) Secretary Nepal Bar Association         ‐Member Secretary    (2)  The  tenure  of  member  nominated  pursuant  to  Sub‐section  (1)  of  Clause (d) shall be of three years.    Sec 7. Constitution, functions, duties and powers of District Legal  Aid Committee:    (1) The District Legal Aid Committee for each district shall be constituted  comprising of the following members to provide legal aid to indigent  person  at  the  district  level  and  also  list  a  panel  of  lawyers  for  the  purpose of providing legal aid to the indigent person.      (a) Government Attorney of the Government Attorney office       where the Appellate Court located, or District Government       Advocate  where such Appellate Court is not located  ‐ Chairperson    (b) President of superior Bar Unit among the Bar Association Units     at  the  District  Provided  that,  President  of  the  District  Bar  Association  shall  be  the  member  for  the  purpose  of  Kathmandu  District.                ‐ Member    (c) Two lawyers nominated from District Committee from among     the lawyers of the district                                               ‐ Member    (d) Secretary  of  Superior  Bar  Unit  among  the  Bar  Association  Units  located  in  that  District  Provided  that,  Secretary  of  District  Bar  Association  shall be the member‐secretary in case of Kathmandu  District.                 ‐ Member  Sec.    (2) The tenure of the members pursuant to part (c) of sub‐section (1) shall  be of 3 years.   
  42. 42. 42 Sec. 8. Legal Aid Fund : (1) There shall be a fund for the functioning of  the Legal Aid and the fund shall have the following money:    (a)  Money received from Government of Nepal as grant.    (b)  Money  received  as  grant,  aid,  subscription  from  an  individual,  Association or institution.    (c) Money received from other sources.    However many provision of Leal Aid Act, 1997 is of discretionary type. So  absolute justice may not be expected. The Act has some basic provisions  regarding  Legal  Aid  but  it  lacks  many  prominent  provisions  being  embodied in it. The act is incomplete and incomprehensive since it has  not even covered the sole concept of legal aid. It is not a living law but  merely  a  positive  law  that  seems  unsuccessful  achieving  the  goal  as  expressed in its preamble.     (A)  AMENDMENT IN THE LEGAL AID ACT, 1997:    The following provisions of the Legal Aid Act 1997, has been amended by  Some Nepal Acts Amendment Act  in 1999 and 2nd  Amendment in 2015 as  follows:    In  sec  2.  after  (a)  the  following  (a1)  has been  added:  "Indigent  Person"  means the person having less than the specified annual income or gender  violence or victim of armed conflict.    In spite of the Section 3 sub section (1) the following sub section (1) has  been made: The indigent person can be entitled to Legal Aid under this  Act.      4.4  LEGAL AID RULES, 199851     Rule.3. Application has to be submitted to be entitled to Legal Aid:     (1) A Nepalese citizen who intends to be entitled to legal aid pursuant to  51 Legal Aid Rules, (1998)
  43. 43. 43 the  Act or these Rules shall submit an application in the committee in  the format as prescribed by Schedule‐1.     (2) The  application  submitted  pursuant  to  Sub‐rule  (1)  shall  attach  a  recommendation made by, in the format prescribed by Schedule‐ 2, in  case of Village Development Committee by Chairperson or Member or  Secretary  of  the  concerned  Village  Development  Committee  and  in  case of municipality by chairperson of the concerned ward.     (3)Notwithstanding  anything  contained  in  Sub‐rule  (3),  if  the  person  intending  to  be  entitled  to  Legal  Aid  does  not  know  to  fill  the  application form or is unable to attend in the committee's office to fill  the  application  form,  then  other  person  who  is  trusted  by  him/her  shall submit an application in the committee.     (4) If the application submitted pursuant to Sub‐rule (3), the committee's  employee shall register the application after making required inquiry  according to the provisions of the application form and also attaching  the recommendations made pursuant to Sub‐rule (2).      (5)While  the  application  is  submitted  for  the  registration  in  the  committee,  if  there  are  any  documents  which  verifies  the  detailed  mentioned in the application, such document also has to be submitted  by the applicant.     Rule 4 Examination of the Application : The member secretary shall  make an examination on the application registered pursuant to Rule 3 and  the attached documents herewith and shall submit it in the meeting of the  committee.     Rule 5  Decision of the of the committee and information:     (1)  In  relation  to  the  application  submitted  in  the  meeting  of  the  committee pursuant to Rule 4, the committee shall make a decision on  whether to provide legal Aid or not subject to the provisions of the Act,  these Rules and policies and directives determined time and again by  the central committee.     (2) Regarding the decision made pursuant to Sub‐rule (1), the nature of the 
  44. 44. 44 applicant's  case,  the  limitation  for  the  registration  of  a  case  or  the  limitation for the reply in a case shall be considered and decision have  to be made within the Forty Five days since the date of application.     (3) The information on decision made by the committee pursuant to Sub‐ rule (2) shall be provided to the concerned applicant.     Rule 6  Legal Aid shall not be entitled:  (1) The  committee  shall  not  entitle any person who has the Annual income more than 40,000  Rupees, for legal aid.   (2)  The  committee  shall  not  entitle  the  convicted  party  of  the  following cases, for legal aid:‐   (a)  Under the Espionage Act, 2018 (1962),   (b)  Under the Human Trafficking (Control) Act, 2043,   (c)  Cases under Ancient Monument Preservation Act, 2013,   (d)  Cases which has the punishment under Chapter on Rape of the  Country Code (Muluki Ain),    (e) Cases  under  Prevention  of  Corruption  Act,  2017  and  Commission for the Investigation and Abuse of Authority Act,  2048,   (f)  Cases under the Revenue Leakages Control Act, 2052,   (g)  Cases under Drug (Control) Act, 2033,   (h)  Other cases prescribed on time and again by central committee.      Rule 7   The expenditure for Legal Aid have to be reimbursed :     (1)   If  any  person  receives  some  property  or  economic  benefit  in  consequence  of  the  entitlement  of  Legal  Aid,  such  person  shall  reimburse the expenditure made by the committee, in the course of  providing Legal Aid to him/her.     (2)  During the reimbursement of the expenditure pursuant to Sub‐rule  (1), only the amount at the rate of Ten percent of the total property or  economic benefit shall be reimbursed.    In the Legal Aid Reles, 1998; There is no any necessary criteria or the pre‐ conditions  of  the  people  or  situations  mentioned  to  entitle  the  Legal  Assistance. Rule 3, 4 and 5 seems to be impractical and the Rule 6(1) has  the  provision  that  any  person  shall  not  entitle  Legal  Aid  who  has  the 

×