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 Why?
 What?
 How to use it?
 How to disseminate it?
2
Community-Based Tourism (CBT)
toolkit
Caribbean Tourism Organis...
1. Build capacity of BSOs to support clusters, including CTO
 CBT projects can represent the best example of cluster init...
4
What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that
people can use to achieve each purpose
Tool Description
COMMUNITY
TOUR...
5
COMMUNITY TOURISM
DEVELOPMENT
Template to prepare an inventory of assets found in the
community which are valuable for C...
6
6 types of assets, 19 sub-types,
171 options
Asset Types List - Reference for completing sheets: 1) Accommodation, 2) At...
7
COMMUNITY TOURISM
DEVELOPMENT
1
Tourism Assets Inventory
Instructions
To list and categorise the products, services and ...
8
COMMUNITY TOURISM
DEVELOPMENT
Frame of reference to assess market readiness and gaps
based on KSFs, and discuss prioriti...
9
Community tourism developmentGovernance and Leadership
CBT integrated in local economic planning
Representative governan...
10
Questions suggested to
facilitate:
Compete Caribbean-Caribbean Tourism Organization
Community-Based Tourism Readiness D...
11
What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that
people can use to achieve each purpose
Tool Description
COMMUNITY
TOU...
12
ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT
User-friendly guidebook to help entrepreneurs develop profitable
CBT enterprises that return ben...
13
ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT
User-friendly guidebook to help entrepreneurs develop profitable
CBT enterprises that return ben...
The CBT enterprise handbook is based on the market-Readiness model
developed by Small Planet Inc.
15
What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that
people can use to achieve each purpose
Tool Description
COMMUNITY
TOU...
16
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
Assessment of willingness-to-pay of American visitors for
experiences that can be offered by Caribb...
17
15 activities prioritized out of 30 considered based on
potential benefits for Caribbean MSMEs
Niche Markets Category C...
18
Four activities further prioritized based on research
findings to optimize regional benefits
 These activities show hi...
19
The four top activities that can generate the most
revenues for Caribbean businesses involved agrifood
Traditional
Cuis...
20
Each activity analyzed: preferred characteristics, who to
target, how to market, how to price, etc.
Local Tourism
 Mos...
 Deal breaker: Perception of safety and hygiene
Inform customers
Certifications to show that standards are met
 Visito...
22
What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that
people can use to achieve each purpose
Tool Description
COMMUNITY
TOU...
23
MARKET DEVELOPMENT
2-page template to collect information about the types of
experiences found in the community to attr...
 Why?
 What?
 How to use it?
 How to disseminate it?
24
Community-Based Tourism (CBT)
toolkit
Caribbean Tourism Organi...
 Regional webinar in October
 Network of BSOs, newsletter, websites, etc
 CTO Conference on sustainable tourism: 2-day
...
26
Concept Note
 Full budget &
implementation plan
 Partnership agreement
with commitment letter(s)
for counterpart
cont...
Hythe, Maxwell Main Road
Christ Church, Barbados.
Tel: 1. 246. 627. 8500 • Fax: 1 .246. 429. 8869
Email: competecaribbean@...
Productivity & Innovation
in the private sector
Business climate
reforms
Pillar1
Pillar2
(a) Clusters and value chains
Inc...
 More than half of
Caribbean MSMEs are
underbanked for a variety
of reasons.
 The lack of access to
cost-effective digit...
30
Four calls for cluster proposals (+$3M)
-> one for tourism only (2019-2020)
USD$100k to $300k technical
assistance gran...
 Firms must operate in CCPF’s 13 beneficiary countries:
Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, Trinidad
a...
32
Counterpart Contribution (20%):
half in-kind, half in-cash
Cash contribution (10%) In-kind contribution (10%)
• Equipme...
 Job creation in the short and long term (~25%) – the extent to
which the cluster project will create new jobs, including...
34
Technology Extension Services (TES) to
increase productivity of firms
Size guidelines # of employees Revenues (USD)
Mic...
TES pilot in the Caribbean - DRAFT
4-step approach
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. Jamaica
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. S...
Example of TES
– General business analysis, strategic
planning, successive planning, executive
coaching
– Financial analys...
What is a cluster? Why clustering?
• Joint marketing to increase global market share
• Training – co-investment in human c...
38
The four top activities that can generate the most
revenues for Caribbean businesses involved agrifood
Beach Tourism
To...
Indigenous Tourism
Tourism activity that is owned, operated, and/or managed by members of indigenous communities, and offe...
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Caribbean Agrotourism Policy Setting Workshop: Annie Bertrand; Community Based Tourism Toolkit

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The development of productive and fully integrated linkages between the Agri-Food Sector and Tourism in the Caribbean Region offers significant potential for repositioning and broad-based growth in the Agriculture value chain, and opportunities for channelling the Region’s diversity and building-in genuine competitiveness and sustainability in the tourism product.

Forging Agriculture-Tourism linkages capitalizes on the inherent ability of the Tourism sector to diversify the Caribbean economy, stimulate entrepreneurship, catalyse investment and assist in wider social development in local communities. Such linkages offer unprecedented  opportunities to stem and reverse the declines in traditional agriculture, stimulate the rapid growth in “new‟ agriculture and build resilience and sustainability of Caribbean economies. The latter is particularly critical for reducing the high levels of foreign exchange leakage in tourism, preserving cultural identity, reducing poverty in local communities and enhancing local awareness and good practices with respect to climate change and environmental issues.

Goal: To provide a mechanism for managing and increasing the local and regional development impact of Tourism and Agriculture through the creation of a collaborative and inclusive planning and implementation framework that can drive trade and new business between the two sectors.

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Caribbean Agrotourism Policy Setting Workshop: Annie Bertrand; Community Based Tourism Toolkit

  1. 1. Sign-up to our newsletter for updates on calls for proposals, consulting opportunities or new research findings www.competecaribbean.org Inclusive and sustainable economic growth through global competitiveness
  2. 2.  Why?  What?  How to use it?  How to disseminate it? 2 Community-Based Tourism (CBT) toolkit Caribbean Tourism Organisation (CTO)’s definition of CBT: A collaborative approach to tourism in which community members exercise control through active participation in appraisal, development, management and/or ownership of enterprises that delivers: • Net socio-economic benefits to community members; • Conserves natural and cultural resources; and • Adds value to the experiences of local and foreign visitors. This encompasses both tourism activities in a community and goods and services supplied to the tourism industry by one or more community members. For Compete Caribbean, CBT...  Fosters inclusive development by generating revenues and employment for underprivileged groups;  Diversifies the product offering to increase global competitiveness;  Helps preserve tourism assets for sustainable development
  3. 3. 1. Build capacity of BSOs to support clusters, including CTO  CBT projects can represent the best example of cluster initiatives • involves collaboration among MSMEs and large firms • integrates business relationships at the local, national and international levels • Address coordination failures  MoT in most Caribbean countries created a position to support CBT in their country 2. Build a pipeline of cluster projects that Compete Caribbean and others can fund  Call for cluster proposals in 2017: only 19% of applications from tourism • Insufficient given the impact on inclusive and sustainable economic development in the Caribbean • Success of tourism clusters in CC1 (Pure Grenada, Rupununi, Treasure Beach) 3 Why developing a CBT toolkit?
  4. 4. 4 What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that people can use to achieve each purpose Tool Description COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT Use Users A frame of reference to assess the community’s capacity for CBT based on key success factors (KSFs). ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Template to prepare an inventory of tourism assets found in the community. Inventory number, range & quality of tourism assets in community, identify strengths and gaps Tourism Assets Inventory  Community Organizations  National Tourism Organisations (NTOs)  Business Support Organisations (BSOs) Assess market readiness and gaps to identify priorities that can be included in a project plan and/or funding proposal CBT Diagnostic  Development agencies  Community organisations +/-2-page template to collect information about the types of experiences found in the community to attract visitors. MARKET DEVELOPMENT Promote the diversity of CBT opportunities in the Caribbean CBT Profiles Database of CBT profiles in the Caribbean?  CTO representatives in USA, UK and Canada  NTOs  Tour operators  Visitors CBT Enterprise handbook  CBT Enterprises owners & managers  NTOs  BSOs User-friendly business guide to develop profitable CBT enterprises that return benefits to communities. Start, improve, formalize and expand CBT business operations Community-Based Tourism (CBT) toolkit Purpose Assessment of willingness-to- pay of American visitors for experiences that can be offered by Caribbean MSMEs. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Refine, expand and price the product offerings to increase tourism spending Consumer research in American market by Euromonitor  Entrepreneurs  Business Support Organisations (BSOs)  National Tourism Organizations (NTO’s) 1 2 3 4 5
  5. 5. 5 COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT Template to prepare an inventory of assets found in the community which are valuable for CBT development Tourism Asset Inventory I. Accommodations 1.1 Bed & breakfast 1.2 Cabin / lodge / ecolodge 1.3 Campground 1.4 Apartment / villa 1.5 Guest house/ inn 1.6 Homestay 1.7 Hostel 1.8 Hotel 1.9 Other II. Attractions 2.1 Festivals & Events 2.2 Culture & Heritage Attractions 2.3 Natural Attractions 2.4 General Attractions III. Services 3.1 Food & Beverage 3.2 Shopping & Markets 3.3 Transportation IV. Experiences (Tours & Activities) 4.1 Culture & Heritage 4.2 Water-based Adventure 4.3 Land-Based Adventure Local V. Experts 5.1 Tourism 5.2 Natural and Cultural Heritage 5.3 Performing Arts 5.4 Visual Arts VI. Infrastructure 6.1 Security 6.2 Health 6.3 Visitor 6.4 Other 1
  6. 6. 6 6 types of assets, 19 sub-types, 171 options Asset Types List - Reference for completing sheets: 1) Accommodation, 2) Attractions, 3) Services, 4) Experiences (Tours & Activities) 5) Local Experts 6) Supporting Infrastructure 1. Accommodation 1 Accommodations 2.1 Festivals & Events 2.2 Culture & Heritage Attractions 2.3 Natural Attractions 2.4 General Attractions 3.1 Food & Beverage 3.2 Shopping & Markets 3.3 Transportation 4.1 Culture & Heritage 4.2 Water-based Adventure 4.3 Land-Based Adventure 5.1 Tourism 5.2 Natural and Cultural Heritage 5.3 Performing Arts 5.4 Visual Arts 6.1 Security 6.2 Health 6.3 Visitor 6.4 Other 1 bed & breakfast agricultural archaeological site beach rivertubing / rafting /kayaking cafe clothes market air services art/graffiti, etc. boating ATV/quads boat captain farmer actor artisan community Watch program doctors bank 2 cabin / lodge / ecolodge community architecture cave amusement park ethnic restaurant craft market bus services dance canoeing cycling cook/chef historian artist artist police services hospitals currency exchange service 3 campground cultural art gallery cenote aquarium fast food restaurant farmers market car rental services educational diving/snorkelli ng caving driver geologist (rocks) dance group film maker security service medical clinics Internet access point 4 apartment / villa food/ drink/ wine artisan facility desert casino food tour fish market ferry services food/gastronom y fly fishing hiking tour guide ornithologist (birds) dancer designer trained security guards other phone line / chips 5 guest house/ inn heritage/ history cemetery forest observatory full service restaurant produce market route taxi services indigenous kayaking horseback riding housekeeper / cleaner fisher folk music group potter other public washroom 6 homestay performing art church/temple garden / farm science centre gourmet restaurant souvenir store taxi services health & wellness river rafting / tubing walking spa therapist natural / alternative healers musician photographer visitor information service 7 hostel sports food processing lake stadium/arena home meal store other herbal / traditional medicine sport fishing mountain biking other storytelling singer print maker 8 hotel visual art great house land-based park suspension bridge street stands stand/kiosk museum wildlife viewing scooters traditional knowledge singing group textile artist (crochet, embroidery, knit, weave)9 other other heritage site marine park sightseeing tram bar / beverage only place other spiritual other trekking cultural / sports icon theatre group videographer 10 indigenous site river water slide/park other other wildlife viewing other other writer 11 lighthouse trail zoo other other 12 memorial / monument waterfall other 13 museum wetland 14 pyramid wildlife viewing site 15 theatre other 16 rum distillery 17 other 6. Supporting Infrastructure 4. Experiences (Tours and Activities) - 3 types, multiple sub-types 2. Attractions - 4 types, multiple sub-types 3. Services - 3 types, multiple sub-types 5. Local Experts - 4 types, multiple sub-types
  7. 7. 7 COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT 1 Tourism Assets Inventory Instructions To list and categorise the products, services and infrastructure in the community used (or potentially used) for tourism in order to support the development of Community-Based Tourism (CBT). Have an inventory of demand generators, which is what is available in the community to attract visitors and support packaging and promotion of CBT products and services. * Any businesses or assets that visitors might use, see, hear or touch while in the community. * The most important information to record is name, location, and contact person to update details. Seven tabs including the "Asset List" which covers the main tourism categories and types of assets: (1) Accommodations - e.g., homestays, hotels, ecolodge, camping, bed & breakfast. (2) Attractions - Festivals & Events, Culture & Heritage Attractions, Natural Attractions, General Attractions. (3) Services - Food & Beverage, Shopping & Markets, Transportation. (4) Experiences (Tours & Activities) - Culture & Heritage, Water-based Adventure, Land-based Adventure. (5) Local Experts (persons with special knowledge) - Tourism, Cultural Heritage, Natural Heritage, Performing Arts, Visual Arts. (6) Infrastructure - Visitor and community infrastructure important for tourism. * Use community and tourism websites, business directories, phone books, bulletin boards, etc. * Identify people in the community who know what is available in the community. * Fill or ask others (such as students) to fill each tab to the best of their knowledge. * Identify someone responsible for maintaining the master file so any changes made are captured centrally. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): 1 Should non- CBT tourism assets be included? Yes, non-CBT tourism assets should be included because: - Visitors often use a mix of CBT and non-CBT products and services. - When packaging, CBT businesses can work with non-CBT businesses to create engaging experiences and provide complementary tourism products and services. - Non-CBT tourism businesses are important marketing partners for CBT e.g., they may display mend you to their guests, or become a reseller of your Use: Purpose: What to include: Asset components: How to complete: 2) Attractions: 2.1 Festivals and Events, 2.2 Culture & Heritage Attractions, 2.3 Natural Attractions, 2.4 General Attractions 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Short Description Briefly describe - description of attraction (max 150 characters) Comments Include notes on visitor appeal, visitor capacity, other relevant info e.g., renovations, closures, development plans Type (select from drop- down menu or refer to Asset List) Sub-type (select from drop-down menu or refer to Asset List) Name (How people recognize the place, i.e. brand name) Location (Village & street where the attraction is located) Name of main contact for booking (First & Last name) Phone (XXX-XXX-XXXX) Email Website Facebook Page Community owned? (yes/ no/ partially) Name of main owner(s) (First & Last) (If Any) % of female ownership
  8. 8. 8 COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT Frame of reference to assess market readiness and gaps based on KSFs, and discuss priorities that can be included in a project plan and/or funding proposal Diagnostic tool 2 1. Governance and Leadership 2. Community Participation 3. Access to Resources 4. Infrastructure & Services 5. Human Resources 6. Tourism Assets 7. Product Development and Marketing 7 dimensions that must be assessed for community tourism development For each dimension, market readiness can be assessed for 68 key success factors in CBT
  9. 9. 9 Community tourism developmentGovernance and Leadership CBT integrated in local economic planning Representative governance Partnerships Independent administration Community Participation Community interest Knowledgeable community members Community consultation and engagement Protocols for visitors Access to Resources Access to land Protected CBT assets Access to business support services Access to finance Access to capital investments Access to technical training Infrastructure & Services Accessibility Basic infrastructure (water, waste, electrical, communication and financial services) Health and medical Security Human Resources Management skills Operational skills Licenses and credentials Tourism Assets Asset inventory Signage Retail/shops Product Development and Marketing Market research Product base Marketing Industry linkages Community-based tourism (CBT) framework 7 dimensions and 68 success factors for effective community- based tourism (CBT)
  10. 10. 10 Questions suggested to facilitate: Compete Caribbean-Caribbean Tourism Organization Community-Based Tourism Readiness Diagnostic - Success Factors Criteria and Scoring Key CBT success factors Assign a score based on best estimate of the extent to which the community meets each criterion Meets 2 points Partially meets 1 point Does not Meet 0 point Comments (e.g., Activities already place to meet criterion, assistance required to meet it, critical gaps to be addressed to meet it) Governance and Leadership Is Community Based Tourism CBT part of a broader community development plan? Does the community prioritize CBT as a development strategy? Does the community have a written CBT development strategy or plan? Has zoning been done to designate areas in the community to be used for tourism? Is there a management committee (or group) responsible for CBT? Does the CBT committee involve women? Is the CBT committee representative of community members (e.g., youth, elderly, farmers, fishers, as relevant to the community)? Partnerships Does the community have strong partnerships with government, NGOs or other agencies that support the community's CBT development plans? Independent Administration Does the community have established administrative and financial systems and procedures specifically for developing and managing CBT (e.g., separate accounting systems and bank accounts used only for CBT development, CBT funds not subject to appropriation for other uses)? Section Subtotal: 0 0 0 Community Participation Is there interest from community members to champion CBT activities? Have you addressed any resistance from community members against CBT? Has tourism awareness education been conducted to help community members understand tourism and its opportunities (e.g., how the tourism sector works, the benefits and drawbacks, the types of jobs and business opportunities it creates, social impact)? Does the community have knowledge and experience in CBT (e.g., tourism training been done, community members own or have worked in tourism enterprises)? Does the CBT committee, or community decision makers, hold regular meetings to discuss CBT development with community members? Does the community have a system that is used to provide information to community members? (e.g., public information boards, What's App group, Facebook group) Does the community have a system to allow community members to provide input and/or make decisions on CBT initiatives that affect the community (e.g., community meetings, voting)? Protocols for visitors Has the community defined cultural and/or community protocols and boundaries that protect the community and reflect community values and beliefs (e.g., sites not to be visited, unwanted visitor behaviour, privacy infringement)? Subtotals: 0 0 0 Access to Resources Access to land Does the community own lands or have secure legal access to lands where CBT development is planned or where CBT activities take place? CBT integrated in local economic planning Representative governance Community consultation & engagement Knowledgeable community members Community interest  Assessment process  Discussion with community members  Prioritization  Fundraising
  11. 11. 11 What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that people can use to achieve each purpose Tool Description COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT Use Users A frame of reference to assess the community’s capacity for CBT based on key success factors (KSFs). ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Template to prepare an inventory of tourism assets found in the community. Inventory number, range & quality of tourism assets in community, identify strengths and gaps Tourism Assets Inventory  Community Organizations  National Tourism Organisations (NTOs)  Business Support Organisations (BSOs) Assess market readiness and gaps to identify priorities that can be included in a project plan and/or funding proposal CBT Diagnostic  Development agencies  Community organisations +/-2-page template to collect information about the types of experiences found in the community to attract visitors. MARKET DEVELOPMENT Promote the diversity of CBT opportunities in the Caribbean CBT Profiles Database of CBT profiles in the Caribbean?  CTO representatives in USA, UK and Canada  NTOs  Tour operators  Visitors CBT Enterprise handbook  CBT Enterprises owners & managers  NTOs  BSOs User-friendly business guide to develop profitable CBT enterprises that return benefits to communities. Start, improve, formalize and expand CBT business operations Community-Based Tourism (CBT) toolkit Purpose Assessment of willingness-to- pay of American visitors for experiences that can be offered by Caribbean MSMEs. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Refine, expand and price the product offerings to increase tourism spending Consumer research in American market by Euromonitor  Entrepreneurs  Business Support Organisations (BSOs)  National Tourism Organizations (NTO’s) 1 2 3 4 5
  12. 12. 12 ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT User-friendly guidebook to help entrepreneurs develop profitable CBT enterprises that return benefits to communities. CBT Enterprise handbook 3 1.0 The Global Travel Industry 1.1 Many Different Parts 1.2 The Global Scene 1.3 Impacts of Tourism 1.4 Global Tourism Trends 2.0 Understanding CBT 2.1 What is Community-Based Tourism (CBT)? 2.2 What are the Benefits and Drawbacks of CBT? 2.3 Community-Based Tourism in the Caribbean Types of CBT Experiences in the Caribbean: 2019 3.0 Protecting and Involving Your Community 3.1 What is Cultural Authenticity? 3.2 How Can You Protect and Benefit Your Community? 4.0 Planning your CBT Business 4.1 What is a ‘Market Ready’ Tourism Business? 4.2 What are the Steps to Starting a CBT Business? 4.3 What Goes into a Business Plan? 4.4 Where Can I Get Help for My Business Plan? 5.0 Understanding Your Markets 5.1 What is Market-Driven Research? 5.2 Which Types of Visitors Have the Most Potential? 5.3 Who is my Ideal Guest? 6.0 Developing Your Product 6.1 What is Packaging? 6.2 What Types of CBT Packages Do Visitors Buy? 6.3 What are the Essential Qualities of a CBT Product? 6.4 What Product Can I Offer? 6.5 What are the Steps in Product Development? 7.0 Pricing Your Product 7.1 How Does the Travel Distribution System Work? 7.2 What Commissions Do the Travel Trade Expect? 7.3 What are Net and Retail Rates? 7.4 How Do I Calculate My Net Rate? 7.5 How Do I Calculate My Retail Rate?
  13. 13. 13 ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT User-friendly guidebook to help entrepreneurs develop profitable CBT enterprises that return benefits to communities. CBT Enterprise handbook 3 8.0 Meeting Visitor Expectations 8.1 What is Values-Based Guest Hospitality? 8.2 How Can I Create a Sense of Place? 8.3 What is Genuine Hosting? 8.4 How Should I Prepare Guests for Their Visit? 8.5 How Can I Learn from Feedback? 9.0 Marketing Your Product 9.1 What are the 4 Ps of Marketing? 9.2 What Goes into a Marketing Plan? 9.3 Why is Branding Important? 9.4 How Do I Make a Marketing Content Library? 9.5 Why is Online Marketing Important? 9.6 What are the Best Ways to Market? 10.0 Developing Financial Management Skills 10.1 Why Do I Need Financial Management? 10.2 How Do I Estimate My Start-up Costs? 10.3 How Do I Prepare an Annual Operating Budget 10.4 How Will I Finance My Business? 10.5 What are the Essential Financial Statements? 10.6 What about Taxation and Reporting? 10.7 Why Should I Get Professional Assistance? 10.8 Checklist for Financial Success 11.0 Building Your Support Network 11.1 Building Your Support Network Glossary Appendix 1: References and Resources Appendix 2: NTOs and CBT Development Appendix 3: Experience Development Template Appendix 4: Example Code of Conduct
  14. 14. The CBT enterprise handbook is based on the market-Readiness model developed by Small Planet Inc.
  15. 15. 15 What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that people can use to achieve each purpose Tool Description COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT Use Users A frame of reference to assess the community’s capacity for CBT based on key success factors (KSFs). ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Template to prepare an inventory of tourism assets found in the community. Inventory number, range & quality of tourism assets in community, identify strengths and gaps Tourism Assets Inventory  Community Organizations  National Tourism Organisations (NTOs)  Business Support Organisations (BSOs) Assess market readiness and gaps to identify priorities that can be included in a project plan and/or funding proposal CBT Diagnostic  Development agencies  Community organisations +/-2-page template to collect information about the types of experiences found in the community to attract visitors. MARKET DEVELOPMENT Promote the diversity of CBT opportunities in the Caribbean CBT Profiles Database of CBT profiles in the Caribbean?  CTO representatives in USA, UK and Canada  NTOs  Tour operators  Visitors CBT Enterprise handbook  CBT Enterprises owners & managers  NTOs  BSOs User-friendly business guide to develop profitable CBT enterprises that return benefits to communities. Start, improve, formalize and expand CBT business operations Community-Based Tourism (CBT) toolkit Purpose Assessment of willingness-to- pay of American visitors for experiences that can be offered by Caribbean MSMEs. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Refine, expand and price the product offerings to increase tourism spending Consumer research in American market by Euromonitor  Entrepreneurs  Business Support Organisations (BSOs)  National Tourism Organizations (NTO’s) 1 2 3 4 5
  16. 16. 16 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Assessment of willingness-to-pay of American visitors for experiences that can be offered by Caribbean MSMEs.Consumer research 4 Refine, expand and price the product offerings to increase tourism spending 1. What are visitors interested in spending their money on? 2. How much are they willing to pay? 3. How can Caribbean MSMEs take advantage of this? Increase employment and revenues for people across sectors: farming, agro- processing, logistics, transport, tourism, creative industries, furniture, etc.
  17. 17. 17 15 activities prioritized out of 30 considered based on potential benefits for Caribbean MSMEs Niche Markets Category Category Definition Price range Number of businesses Community involvement Employment potential Interest/ Popularity (US) Capacity in the Caribbean Score Culture and Heritage Tourism Local Tourism Tourism activity that offers experiences linked to the local/host community. May include multiple activities across various tourism niches and categories, with an aim to offer an authentic and local experience. Experiences may be packaged to include transportation, accommodation, meals, a guide, etc. 100-2000+ 100+ High High High High 5.00 Agro and Food Tourism Food and Beverage Tour Expeditions that include visits/excursions linked to food and related products and activities. Tours might highlight the process, include a tasting and/or culinary cooking activity. Popular tours include rum, coffee, spices, and chocolate. 30-1200 26-100 High High High High 4.70 Culture and Heritage Tourism Homestay A homestay property is an alternative accommodation in a private residence/local home that accommodates paying guests. Travelers usually stay with a family and experience their cooking. Homestays can be offered by individuals and their families or by structured organizations. 35-110 100+ High Mid High High 4.50 Scientific, Academic, Volunteer and Educational Tourism (S.A.V.E.) School Exchanges and Cultural Immersion Travel experience which has as a primary motivation the tourist’s engagement and experience in learning, self-improvement, intellectual growth and skills development. Includes a broad range of products and services related to academic studies, skill enhancement, school trips, career development courses and language learning among others. Experiences can be focused on 1000-2000+ 1-25 High High High High 4.40 Agro and Food Tourism Traditional Cuisine Activities in the destination where the local food and beverage including agricultural products, gastronomic offerings and methods of food preparation are the primary pull factors and key aspects of the experience. Can be offered at family and local restaurants including the traditional fish fry. 10-15 100+ High Mid High High 4.40 Agro and Food Tourism Farm to Table A culinary experience that includes products that are locally grown or sourced. This may include a farm tour, harvesting ingredients, and/or a cooking class in addition to a meal/tasting using locally sourced ingredients. 25-110 26-100 High High High Mid 4.20 Scientific, Academic, Volunteer and Educational Tourism (S.A.V.E.) Volunteer with Local Experience Trips taken to a destination for the purpose of assisting the host community, often with a social cause as the primary motivation with travel as a complementary feature. Examples include voluntourism for reconstruction in the aftermath of a natural disaster, community development activities, conservation, and clean-ups. 800-2000+ 1-25 High High Mid High 4.00 Culture and Heritage Tourism Indigenous Tourism Tourism activity that is owned, operated, and/or managed by members of indigenous communities, and offers unique and authentic experiences to visitors while also contributing to sustaining local livelihoods, protecting valued socio-cultural traditions, and the natural and cultural heritage resources of the community. 30-110 1-25 Mid Mid High High 3.50
  18. 18. 18 Four activities further prioritized based on research findings to optimize regional benefits  These activities show highest benefits for the region.  They are most interesting to US tourists. A) Prioritize  Interest level among tourists is low, as are the benefits for the Caribbean compared to the rest of the activities.  Requires repositioning to strengthen both. D) Redefine  Benefits for the Caribbean are high.  US tourists show low interest; therefore, promotion and repositioning are required. B) Promote internationally  US tourists are highly interested in these.  They bring lower benefits to the region - therefore they need further development. C) Develop locally Caribbeanbenefits* Interest level of tourists**Low High LowHigh B) Promote internationally A) Prioritize D) Redefine C) Develop locally *Caribbean benefits refer to the combination of metrics from the scorecard (community involvement, employment potential, capacity, activity price, and number of businesses) **Interest levels based on consumer survey, N = 629 C) Develop locally Food-related
  19. 19. 19 The four top activities that can generate the most revenues for Caribbean businesses involved agrifood Traditional Cuisine  Most are willing to pay as much as US$100 for their experience.  Average current price is $10  Half of respondents are willing to pay more for food sourced locally, and nearly 40% for organic produce. Farm to Table  Majority would pay as much as US$100 for their experience.  About half of respondents are willing to pay more if the experience is locally sourced, embraces environmental sustainability, and offers VIP options or access. Food & Beverage Tour  Most are willing to pay up to US$300 per activity.  35% are willing to pay more for attributes like Organic certification, locally sourced, benefits everyone fairly, etc.  Around 20% are willing to pay at least 25%-50% more for VIP options and access.
  20. 20. 20 Each activity analyzed: preferred characteristics, who to target, how to market, how to price, etc. Local Tourism  Most are willing to pay as much as US$300 per activity.  Over half are willing to pay more if they know the ticket price % that goes back to the community and VIP options. Farm tour  Willingness to pay varies from $31 to $300  Current price range currently offered in the Caribbean: $20-150  Should include transport and be combined with other activities
  21. 21.  Deal breaker: Perception of safety and hygiene Inform customers Certifications to show that standards are met  Visitors want to know, see and feel Grown without chemical Organic Sourced locally Providing benefits to local community Fun to experience  Research and book online  Raise awareness 21 Other key findings from survey responses Tell them! Show them! Only 21% of respondents were familiar with CBT, but 79% said they were willing to try once they became aware. Agritourism tour guides?
  22. 22. 22 What is it? The CBT toolkit includes 5 tools that people can use to achieve each purpose Tool Description COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT Use Users A frame of reference to assess the community’s capacity for CBT based on key success factors (KSFs). ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT Template to prepare an inventory of tourism assets found in the community. Inventory number, range & quality of tourism assets in community, identify strengths and gaps Tourism Assets Inventory  Community Organizations  National Tourism Organisations (NTOs)  Business Support Organisations (BSOs) Assess market readiness and gaps to identify priorities that can be included in a project plan and/or funding proposal CBT Diagnostic  Development agencies  Community organisations +/-2-page template to collect information about the types of experiences found in the community to attract visitors. MARKET DEVELOPMENT Promote the diversity of CBT opportunities in the Caribbean CBT Profiles Database of CBT profiles in the Caribbean?  CTO representatives in USA, UK and Canada  NTOs  Tour operators  Visitors CBT Enterprise handbook  CBT Enterprises owners & managers  NTOs  BSOs User-friendly business guide to develop profitable CBT enterprises that return benefits to communities. Start, improve, formalize and expand CBT business operations Community-Based Tourism (CBT) toolkit Purpose Assessment of willingness-to- pay of American visitors for experiences that can be offered by Caribbean MSMEs. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Refine, expand and price the product offerings to increase tourism spending Consumer research in American market by Euromonitor  Entrepreneurs  Business Support Organisations (BSOs)  National Tourism Organizations (NTO’s) 1 2 3 4 5
  23. 23. 23 MARKET DEVELOPMENT 2-page template to collect information about the types of experiences found in the community to attract visitors.CBT destination profile 5 To promote the rich cultural diversity in the Caribbean Database of CBT destinations in the Caribbean Part 1: Community Profile Community Name: Click or tap here to enter text. Introduction Name of community and location (max 2 sentences): Click or tap here to enter text. What name means/How community got its name – interesting info, (max 2 sentences): Click or tap here to enter text. Interesting tidbit that shows or highlights an interesting angle (few sentences): e Click or tap here to enter text. Key Details Population (number of people): Click or tap here to enter text. Indigenous Groups, if relevant (breakdown by %, if possible): Click or tap here to enter text. Languages (main ones, in rank order): Click or tap here to enter text. Customs, traditions or practices to be observed: Click or tap here to enter text. Location (fill in details): Note: also use Google Maps to prepare a map showing location, geographic features, etc. Longitude Click or tap here to enter text. Latitude Click or tap here to enter text. Elevation Click or tap here to enter text. Topography: few sentences with features: Click or tap here to enter text. Weather: few sentences with features: Click or tap here to enter text. Community Arts, Culture and Heritage Experiences A few sentences about the community-based arts, culture and heritage experiences available to visitors, developed based on tourism inventory and field mission. (General overview. No specific info on businesses providing tours.) Click or tap here to enter text. Natural Attractions A few sentences about the special natural features/attractions of the community, such as parks, protected areas. Focus on connection to community – e.g. places which are draws for the destination, and where CTEs take visitors, good places for viewing flora and fauna Click or tap here to enter text. Accommodation A few sentences about types of community accommodation available in the area. If none, provide info about accommodation partners community works with. (General overview. No specific info on businesses providing tours.) Click or tap here to enter text. Visitor Information Names, phone numbers, emails, social media pages for sources of visitor information for community Click or tap here to enter text. Part 2: See, Do & Stay Community Arts, Culture and Heritage Experiences Name Location Contact Type Specific info on community enterprises that provide experiences. Type refers to the type of experience offered e.g., cultural tour, village walk, herbs/medicinal plants walk, kayak tour, etc. Add or delete lines as needed. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Multi-experience Packages If multi-experience and/or multi-destination community tourism packages are available, include information, links, etc. to actual and/or sample day and multi-day packages linking 2 or more experiences, at least one of which is offered by a community enterprise. Add or delete lines as needed. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Community Food Community enterprises that provide food and beverage services. Type refers to the type of food establishment e.g., street stand, fast food, home meal, café, restaurant. Specialty refers to type of food served e.g., local cuisine, indigenous cuisine, vegetarian. Add or delete lines as needed. Name Location Contact Type & Specialty Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Community Accommodation Community enterprises that provide accommodation. Type refers to the type of accommodation offered e.g., home stay, hostel, guest house, B&B, ecolodge, hotel, etc. Add or delete lines as needed. Name Location Contact Type Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. Click or tap here to enter text. How to Get Here Provide short relevant details on how to get to community By Air: Click or tap here to enter text. By Road: (self-drive directions) Click or tap here to enter text. By Road (shared bus service): Click or tap here to enter text. By taxi: Click or tap here to enter text. By Other: e.g. Boat Click or tap here to enter text. Visitor Services & Information Details on key tourism services: 1) washrooms – if no public ones, list places that are friendly to visitors (e.g. gas stations, restaurants); 2) internet – public access points, cafes, etc.; 3) electricity – volts, frequency and plug type as well as available hours, if applicable; 4) Visitor assistance - safety and security services such as police, where help can be obtained by a visitor and sources of visitor information; 5) health services – location of doctors, clinics, hospitals, etc. Publicly accessible washrooms: Internet: Type: ☐Satellite ☐Landline ☐Mobile ☐None Availability: ☐24 Hours ☐Set Times Daily ☐Less Than Daily Access Points: ☐Community Businesses Electricity: Type: ☐Renewable ☐Generator ☐Grid ☐None Availability: ☐24 Hours ☐Set Times Daily ☐Less Than Daily Voltage: ☐110 ☐220 Pin Type: ☐Flat ☐Round ☐Square Visitor Assistance: Click or tap here to enter text. Health Services: Click or tap here to enter text.
  24. 24.  Why?  What?  How to use it?  How to disseminate it? 24 Community-Based Tourism (CBT) toolkit Caribbean Tourism Organisation (CTO)’s definition of CBT: A collaborative approach to tourism in which community members exercise control through active participation in appraisal, development, management and/or ownership of enterprises that delivers: • Net socio-economic benefits to community members; • Conserves natural and cultural resources; and • Adds value to the experiences of local and foreign visitors. This encompasses both tourism activities in a community and goods and services supplied to the tourism industry by one or more community members. For Compete Caribbean, CBT...  Fosters inclusive development by generating revenues and employment for underprivileged groups;  Diversifies the product offering to increase global competitiveness;  Helps preserve tourism assets for sustainable development
  25. 25.  Regional webinar in October  Network of BSOs, newsletter, websites, etc  CTO Conference on sustainable tourism: 2-day training of 13 MoT officers to help them deliver:  National webinar for national tourism AND community-based AND business support organisations  Workshop in a community targeted at women • Distribution of hard copies of the handbook  Project Concept Note (PCN) for the cluster call  Call for cluster proposals 25 Disseminating the Community-Based Tourism (CBT) toolkit
  26. 26. 26 Concept Note  Full budget & implementation plan  Partnership agreement with commitment letter(s) for counterpart contribution (20%)  Terms of Reference (ToR) for all projects  Baseline data Cluster Development Plan (CDP)  Application form online Investment Panel (IP)  Independent panel of judges from the private/ public sector  Selection of projects based on scoring system IDB Contract  Letter of Agreement  Any other conditional requirements +1 month Implementation  Recruit and manage consultants  Monitor and evaluate progress  Establish sustainable structure and processes 24 months3-month 1 day2-month Cluster selection process and timeline Nov-Dec 2019 Feb–April 2020 June 2020 (to be confirmed) Deadlines 2020-2022 Call for tourism clusters to be announced shortly – sign up to newsletter www.competecaribbean.org $100k-$400k technical assistance grant available for tourism clusters
  27. 27. Hythe, Maxwell Main Road Christ Church, Barbados. Tel: 1. 246. 627. 8500 • Fax: 1 .246. 429. 8869 Email: competecaribbean@iadb.org Thank you! Sign-up to our newsletter: www.competecaribbean.org A multi-donor facility that provides technical assistance to increase the competitiveness of the Caribbean private sector. The results expected are increased employment, revenues and exports using an inclusive and sustainable approach.
  28. 28. Productivity & Innovation in the private sector Business climate reforms Pillar1 Pillar2 (a) Clusters and value chains Inclusiveness Climate change Sustainability Catalytic impactGender  OECS, Jamaica and Barbados ecosystem  Corporate venturing (regional)  Social innovation in Belize  Public procurement for innovation (regional)  Community-based tourism (CBT) (b) Entrepreneurship & innovation ecosystem (c) Technology adoption in firms  Technology Extension Services (TES)  Blue Tech Challenge  Fintech and blockchain innovation  Ag-Tech pilots  Cluster capacity building in vulnerable countries  Four calls for proposals (a) Policy & regulatory reforms Focused on business and innovation climate, particularly DB indicators (b) Institutional strengthening Focused on evidence-based policy- making (c) Knowledge products & dissemination Enterprise Surveys and others Compete Caribbean Partnership Facility (CCFP): 2 pillars, various instruments
  29. 29.  More than half of Caribbean MSMEs are underbanked for a variety of reasons.  The lack of access to cost-effective digital payment solutions prevents access to potential customers – both online and offline 29 Fintech and blockchain innovation *Using a Structural Gravity General Equilibrium Model, LSE study 2019 Two researches published in 2019 The Role of Fintech and Regulations in Enabling Caribbean MSMEs to grow and innovate  Access to finance and cost of finance represent the greatest constraint to growth  The price friction represents 2.2% of the CARICOM GDP  Addressing these barriers can lead to an increase of 12.7% in tourist arrivals annually*. Tourism and Innovation: Leapfroging the Caribbean private sector A global competition and a blockchain symposium will be organized in 2019-2020 to foster adoption of technology and help firms transition into the fourth industrial revolution. We can all play un role in creating demand for innovative technology
  30. 30. 30 Four calls for cluster proposals (+$3M) -> one for tourism only (2019-2020) USD$100k to $300k technical assistance grant for each selected cluster Technical assistance can include  Market research / Fam tour  Product development / testing  Marketing campaign  Training  Standards/licencing  Organic certification  Cluster coordination  Geographic indicator  Process reengineering  Research & development  Etc.  Access to larger markets;  Business development/branding;  Cost sharing/saving;  Workforce development;  Higher and more uniform quality standards;  Supply chain or process improvements;  Advocacy  Climate change adaptation / leadership Objectives A cluster is a group of interconnected firms operating near each other that collaborate and compete to obtain a larger share of the global market.
  31. 31.  Firms must operate in CCPF’s 13 beneficiary countries: Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines  Cluster Project must involve 3 or more private-sector firms  Lead firm submitting application should provide legal certification of registration  Commitment for counterpart contribution of 10% in cash and 10% in-kind 31 Eligibility
  32. 32. 32 Counterpart Contribution (20%): half in-kind, half in-cash Cash contribution (10%) In-kind contribution (10%) • Equipment needed • Goods (eg: fertilizer, raw material) • Website • Purchase of license • Purchase of airline tickets • Etc. • Staff allocated to manage a project • Space provided for cluster consultants Max. amount allocated by CCPF (80%) – for TA $400,000 Min. amount allocated by cluster in-kind (10%) $50,000 Min. contribution by cluster in-cash (10%) $50,000 Total estimated budget of cluster project $500,000 Minimum budget accepted: $100,000
  33. 33.  Job creation in the short and long term (~25%) – the extent to which the cluster project will create new jobs, including for women and other vulnerable or marginalised groups.  Revenue generation (sales & exports) (~25%) – the extent to which the cluster project will generate increased sales outside the country, within the country indirectly throughout the value chain, or to a clear reduction of imports over time, especially for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs).  Project feasibility/potential impact (~35%) – there is a critical mass of firms with the capacity to absorb technical assistance and become competitive in a global value chain or niche market.  Sustainability (~15%) – the likelihood of sustaining the results achieved once the CCPF project ends; and considerations for climate change and sustainable development. 33 Evaluation criteria
  34. 34. 34 Technology Extension Services (TES) to increase productivity of firms Size guidelines # of employees Revenues (USD) Micro < 5 0 – $250k Small 5-15 $251k – $500k Medium 16-50 $501k – $1.5M Large > 50 > $1.5M Source: Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) Target for TES: Caribbean SMEs TES is one type of innovation policy that Governments have successfully used in other countries to accelerate the pace at which SMEs “catch up” with more advanced firms by transferring knowledge about best practices*. For example in the USA, the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) program generated $32 of return in economic growth for every 1$ invested, translating into $3.6 billion in total new sales annually for SME manufacturers. In terms of employment, an impact assessment revealed that one job was created or retained for every $1,570 of federal investment made in the program.
  35. 35. TES pilot in the Caribbean - DRAFT 4-step approach B) BSOs / SBDCs . Jamaica . Bahamas . St. Lucia . Belize . Barbados . St.Kitts & Nevis . Antigua & Barbuda . Dominica A) Eligible firms High growth potential Agroprocessing or tourism sector Operating in a country of SBDC network Diagnostic validated by certified business assessors* Complete Caribbean Export diagnostic tool * Caribbean Export will train and certify over 30 business assessors across the region in 2018 within and outside the SBDC network. A site visit by a certified business assessor is required for eligibility. Business Diagnostic (Target: 200 firms) Technical Audit (Target: 75 firms) Technical Intervention (Target: 50 firms) Capital Investment (Target: 25 firms) Ensure integrity of diagnostic* Eligible? Coordinate technical audit C)Technical Service Providers (TSP) Lumin Consulting at UWI? Caribbean Export? CHTA? CARIRI? Provide support or refer to others Conduct technical audit (1-day) Accept to implement? Conduct technical intervention Pay 25% of the budget Monitor and record progress on Neoserra Facilitate technical intervention Technical Assistance Plan (TAP) with recommendations and budget Share data on progress Support client with investment proposal and presentation to the bank Need capital to upgrade technology? YesNo Yes No Update M& system Start Technology Extension Services (TES) in the Caribbean Database of TES providers D) Financial institutions / Development Banks Commercial banks? Eco-micro network? Microfinance / Credit unions? Grant programs? Offer financing for technology & equipment Receive fina payment Technical Assistance Report (TAR) with rational for improvements Investment proposal for debt or equity financing
  36. 36. Example of TES – General business analysis, strategic planning, successive planning, executive coaching – Financial analysis, activity-based costing – Energy management – Environmental, health, and safety • food safety, ergonomics, waste management, compliance, pollution prevention, carbon footprinting) – Information technology • computer software/packages for accounting, planning, order entry, scheduling, inventory, such as MRP II, ERP • sourcing and matching for Technology, supplier and vendor – Referral to qualified private consultants, technology centers, or other relevant assistance programs – Lean operations • lean production and lean office, • use of methods such as “5 S”, value stream mapping, pull systems, quick changeover, • cellular manufacturing, • just-in-time systems • waste minimization, • preventive maintenance, and – Quality improvement • certification to standards such as ISO 9000, TS 16949, ISO 13485, ISO/IEC 17025) • Use of statistical process control and methods such as root cause and six sigma – Product development and marketing • lean product development, ideation, market research, business development assistance, lead generation, technology validation
  37. 37. What is a cluster? Why clustering? • Joint marketing to increase global market share • Training – co-investment in human capital • Advocacy with government and partners • Research and product development • Value chain improvement Objectives for firms • Local proximity: Face-to-face interactions to build trust and share knowledge • Lead by the private sector, supported or facilitated by BSOs • Stakeholders reach consensus on top priorities for the cluster to grow • Starts with quick wins: address low-hanging fruits • A mix of firm size – micro, small, medium and large, local, international • Connections with academic and training institutions Key success factors / Best practices • Collaboration multiplies spillover in the community • Increase protection of natural assets • The combination of cooperation and competition fosters innovation over time • Firms that are part of a cluster are stronger than those that are not • Higher productivity, higher wages • More successful start-ups • Attracts Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Objectives for gov./NGOs/dev. agencies A cluster is a group of interconnected firms operating near each other that collaborate and compete to obtain a larger share of the global market.
  38. 38. 38 The four top activities that can generate the most revenues for Caribbean businesses involved agrifood Beach Tourism Tourism activity that is centered around the marine environment. It includes visits to coastal towns and recreational activities related to enjoying the sun, sand, and sea including sunbathing, snorkeling, paddle boarding, scuba diving, walking/playing on the beach, etc.) Ecolodge A tourist accommodation facility that is ecologically designed and managed to have a minimal negative impact on the natural environment and host community in which it is situated. Ecolodges are mainly located in a remote destination in nature, and are often built from natural materials. Farm to Table A culinary experience that includes products that are locally grown or sourced. This may include a farm tour, harvesting ingredients, and/or a cooking class in addition to a meal/tasting using locally sourced ingredients. Farm Tour An activity linked to a tour/visit to an agricultural farm. This can include organic farm tours, or tours of specialized crops such as coffee and cacao plantations, spice farms and medicinal herbs. Farm tours may include meals, food tastings, and/or accommodations. Festival Festivals are events centered on celebrating or commemorating some aspect of local indigenous culture, heritage and traditions, spiritual practice, gastronomy, film and/or music of a country, community, religion, ethnic or social group. Festival Tourism is a popular niche market segment, defined as travel for the main purpose of attending festivals. Food and Beverage Tour Expeditions that include visits/excursions linked to food and related products and activities. Tours might highlight the process, include a tasting and/or culinary cooking activity. Popular tours include rum, coffee, spices, and chocolate. Heritage Site Historical, cultural, archeological and indigenous sites and ruins such as monuments, buildings, structures and cemeteries of significant local value or where political, military, cultural or social history has been preserved. Homestay A homestay property is an alternative accommodation in a private residence/local home that accommodates paying guests. Travelers usually stay with a family and experience their cooking. Homestays can be offered by individuals and their families or by structured organizations.
  39. 39. Indigenous Tourism Tourism activity that is owned, operated, and/or managed by members of indigenous communities, and offers unique and authentic experiences to visitors while also contributing to sustaining local livelihoods, protecting valued socio-cultural traditions, and the natural and cultural heritage resources of the community. Local Tourism Tourism activity that offers experiences linked to the local/host community. May include multiple activities across various tourism niches and categories, with an aim to offer an authentic and local experience. Experiences may be packaged to include transportation, accommodation, meals, a guide, etc. School Exchanges and Cultural Immersion Travel experience which has as a primary motivation the tourist’s engagement and experience in learning, self-improvement, intellectual growth and skills development. Includes a broad range of products and services related to academic studies, skill enhancement, school trips, career development courses and language learning among others. Experiences can be focused on specific subject areas or aspects of culture where learning is the primary goal, and travel is a complementary criterion. Traditional Cuisine Activities in the destination where the local food and beverage including agricultural products, gastronomic offerings and methods of food preparation are the primary pull factors and key aspects of the experience. Can be offered at family and local restaurants including the traditional fish fry. Traditional Health and Wellness Tourism that is based on locally significant wellness activities, done by tourists with the principal purpose of improving their health and wellbeing. Examples may include mineral baths, spa treatments, courses on ancient herbs and their uses, etc. Volunteer with Local Experience Trips taken to a destination for the purpose of assisting the host community, often with a social cause as the primary motivation with travel as a complementary feature. Examples include voluntourism for reconstruction in the aftermath of a natural disaster, community development activities, conservation, and clean-ups. Wellness Activities that offer preventive, lifestyle-enhancing, relaxing, pampering and healing treatments. Experiences can include yoga, mindfulness, and meditation retreats including detox retreats, and retreats guided by expert nutritionists among other specialists. Wildlife Tourism in Natural Habitat Trips to destinations with the main purpose of observing the local fauna. Includes birdwatching, turtle watching, and generally observing wildlife in its natural habitat. This does not include reserves or sanctuaries. Source: Caribbean Tourism Organization, United Nations World Tourism Organization, and Euromonitor International

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