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Your Online Behavior Funds a Social Currency and Creates a Digital Credit Score

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You may have seen it on Black Mirror, how you use social media can be collected into a social credit score. Your activities, what you create, what you say, what you don't say, who you know, can all contribute to a digital relevance score or social stature or hierarchy that can work for or against you.

Long before Black Mirror, Brian Solis, a world leading digital anthropologist, studied the notion of social currencies. In this presentation at the prestigious LIFT Conference in Geneva, Brian discusses the concept of intentional creation and curation.

Presentation: https://youtu.be/l9IJWrG3-s0
Website: www.briansolis.com
GetAbstract: https://www.getabstract.com/en/summary/social-currencies/23179

Every action you take on the Internet affects your “online credit score.” This may seem trivial until you learn of the many and varied implications. Author and analyst Brian Solis shines a light on the practice of grading your online reputation. You might not like it, but you must learn to leverage it. getAbstract recommends this report to consumers interested in maintaining favorable positions in the online and, consequently, offline worlds.

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Your Online Behavior Funds a Social Currency and Creates a Digital Credit Score

  1. 1. Rating 8 Qualities Applicable Social Currencies Brian Solis | Lift Events Sàrl © 2011 Every action you take on the Internet affects your “online credit score.” This may seem trivial until you learn of the many and varied implications. Author and analyst Brian Solis shines a light on the practice of grading your online reputation. You might not like it, but you must learn to leverage it. getAbstract recommends this report to consumers interested in maintaining favorable positions in the online and, consequently, offline worlds. Take-Aways • Social media obscure the boundaries between our “public, private” and “secret” lives. • Digital scoring companies attempt to quantify your online reputation by measuring the size of your network or your online activity. • However, these methods are flawed and can’t measure your actual influence – that is, “your capacity to trigger cause and effect.” • Whether you like it or not, your online activity gets indexed, so regard every online interaction as an opportunity to increase your “online credit score.” • Leverage your “social currency” by garnering positive responses from your network in reaction to your comments, posts, likes, tweets and anything else you share online. Summary Most people in the “real world” lead three lives: “a public life, a private life and a secret life.” Yet when users overshare their personal information online, the boundaries between these discrete realms become obscured. Few people recognize the importance of maintaining a positive online reputation, but your online persona influences more aspects of your life than you may realize. Nowadays, many employers and university admission boards explore social media profiles www.getabstract.com
  2. 2. to gauge individuals’ potential. Some debt collectors even use online platforms as a means of persuasive interaction. Before granting loans, certain banks consider borrowers’ connections on social media platforms when determining their risk, despite the fact that many individuals often connect with complete strangers online. “Your reputation is already working for you or against you online.” Digital scoring companies such as Klout, Peer Index and Rapleaf claim to quantify people’s “online reputation,” which is an important metric to businesses attempting to increase patronage. For example, the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas asks its guests for their Twitter usernames and offers VIP treatment to those with high “social capital scores.” The hotel assumes that a client with a high score has a large sphere of digital influence and will tweet about the hotel, essentially providing free advertising. However, the idea that digital reputation is a marker of influence is inherently flawed. Some digital scoring companies measure your “online credit rating” according to the size of your social network, while others rank you according to the frequency of your online contributions. Yet none can measure your actual influence – that is, “your capacity to trigger cause and effect.” Real influence is a person’s ability to foster “trust, relationships, reciprocity, authority, popularity and recognition” – metrics that online credit ratings can’t quantify. Social capital and influence are not synonymous: Blogger Gary Vaynerchuk has a large network and is a relevant authority on wine, but when actor Paul Giamatti starred in Sideways, a film about wine, his reach and popularity wielded sufficient influence to double the price of pinot noir. Use “this gift we were given called ‘inner monologue’. You don’t have to say everything you think, because it’s there, it’s indexed, it’s searchable, it’s findable.” Like it or loathe it, your every online action gets indexed, and you should consider this every time you share online. Your goal should be to increase your online credit score by leveraging your “social currency” – that is, garnering positive responses from your network in reaction to your comments, posts, likes, tweets and anything else you share. To foster behavior that builds social credit, be mindful of how different sites rate types of online interactions. Reclaim control of your online reputation: “Your future…is in your hands.” About the Speaker Brian Solis is the principal analyst for Altimeter Group. He wrote What’s the Future of Business? Did you like this summary? Watch the video http://getab.li/23179 getAbstract maintains complete editorial responsibility for all parts of this abstract. getAbstract acknowledges the copyrights of authors and publishers. All rights reserved. No part of this abstract may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means – electronic, photocopying or otherwise – without prior written permission of getAbstract AG (Switzerland). 2 of 2

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