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Social Truth: Revealing what Truly Matters to Customers

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Social Truth: Revealing what Truly Matters to Customers

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Working in an era where customers are creating data all around us, it is becoming increasingly critical to understand how to use unstructured data to ensure a 360 degree view of audiences. Do you understand the key attributes that drive the customer experience? Can you afford to let the potential of its value go untapped?

To discover ‘social truth’, marketing professionals require a system that gets beneath what customers say to what they really mean. Find out how linguistic and visual data is changing the future of research to deliver deeper engagement and lifetime customer value.

Working in an era where customers are creating data all around us, it is becoming increasingly critical to understand how to use unstructured data to ensure a 360 degree view of audiences. Do you understand the key attributes that drive the customer experience? Can you afford to let the potential of its value go untapped?

To discover ‘social truth’, marketing professionals require a system that gets beneath what customers say to what they really mean. Find out how linguistic and visual data is changing the future of research to deliver deeper engagement and lifetime customer value.

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Social Truth: Revealing what Truly Matters to Customers

  1. 1. Social Truth: Revealing what Truly Matters to Customers Misia Tramp VP Customer Experience Strategy & Insights 22 May 2017© Metia 1
  2. 2. • Key trends that have changed the way the truth is defined • The truth customers think you need to know about them • A practical framework & example to get to the truth • Key takeaways 2
  3. 3. “There are three sides to every story: your side, my side, and the truth. And no one is lying. Memories shared serve each differently” 3 - Robert Evans (2002) The Kid Stays in thePicture [Documentary]. Highway Films.
  4. 4. 5 Surprise and delight Minimizing customer effort
  5. 5. 6 Value measured by currency Value measured by customer mental energy
  6. 6. 7 CRM CMR
  7. 7. 8 Alignment defined by tactics Alignment defined by purpose & passion
  8. 8. 9 Personalization defined by “individual profiles” Personalization based on “tribal allegiances”
  9. 9. Q. Most brands that we buy from or work with today are very focused on trying to understand the 'truth' behind who their customers are and what they care about so they can better serve them. Please take a photograph that best describes the 'truth' that you think businesses need to know about you to give you an awesome customer experience & explain why.
  10. 10. Respect my time “Don't waste my time I'll never get it back again use the time to tell me exactly what I need to know about your product and why should use it” “This is my truth : busy mom. I need products that help me be more efficient and organized, so I can "automate" certain aspects of life.”
  11. 11. Recognize my individuality…. “Every single person is a complicated individual that cannot be defined by demographics alone” “Everyone is different and not one person/customer will be the same. Ask customers what they like and personalize your priorities to theirs.”
  12. 12. …and don’t make me feel like a burden “Businesses follow the letter of the law, but rarely the spirit, with regard to making it accessible to all. I feel like a burden to them.”
  13. 13. Be fun. Be creative. “Fun and creativity need to be included” “I'm very creative. I think out of the box. A company needs to do the same. This is a coconut I painted. Simple, yet un-original.”
  14. 14. Family comes first (no matter how unconventional) “I am family oriented. My life revolves around my family and their well being. I need products that are going to benefit them and our home.”
  15. 15. What matters to brands What matters to audiences 16
  16. 16. The truth Mutual resonance What matters to brands What matters to audiences 17
  17. 17. BE DATA DRIVEN IN EVERYTHING WE DO (IN REAL TIME!) 18
  18. 18. DATA DRIVEN THINK, DATA SMART 19
  19. 19. “We are not meant to know everything, Mae. Did you ever think that perhaps our minds are delicately calibrated between the known and the unknown? That our souls need the mysteries of night and the clarity of day? Young people are creating ever- present daylight, and I think it will burn us all alive. There will be no time to reflect, to sleep to cool.” Novel by Dave Eggers 20
  20. 20. LISTEN TO THE SILENCES EXPLORE THE UNEXPECTED 21
  21. 21. 22 Less than 5% of social conversations mention a product or a brand
  22. 22. Analysis needs to start at the top of the funnel to be contextually relevant Levelofcontextualresonancetothecustomer. Top of funnel thinking Resonant customer experiences Passion areas & needs Lifestyle & cultural factors Attitude to the category Brand & product perceptions Engagement
  23. 23. The drivers of mutual resonance: The 3 C’s Customer Content Context
  24. 24. (JOSHUA BELL STORY) 22 May 2017© Metia 25 The Joshua Bell story
  25. 25. 26 The data triumvirate Linguistic Data Numeric DataVisual Data
  26. 26. Gather the data in the space you intend to design the solution in
  27. 27. Contextual experience delivery requires contextual data
  28. 28. Insight needs to reflect the anatomy of execution to be actionable (and used!)
  29. 29. 30
  30. 30. 32
  31. 31. 34
  32. 32. #exotic #bejealous #grateful #livingthedream
  33. 33. Design approaches based on the outcomes not the outputs of insights requirements Think about the higher order problem you’re solving for that will create emotional moments Remember you’re speaking to the tribe, not just an individual Ensure the data you collect is contextual & reflects how the audience expresses their perspectives Integrate the actual language of the customer into your insight architecture to explore what’s meaningful Think ‘mutual truth’ and focus on the fair exchange of value Key epiphanies about the content environment

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • We need to make sure that we’re not like the blind men in the fable of the elephant…..not blinded by what we see in front of us & what we choose to believe.

    The moral of the story is that there may be some truth to what someone says. Sometimes we can see that truth and sometimes not because they may have different perspective which we may not agree too


    Once upon a time, there lived six blind men in a village. One day the villagers told them, "Hey, there is an elephant in the village today."  They had no idea what an elephant is. They decided, "Even though we would not be able to see it, let us go and feel it anyway." All of them went where the elephant was. Everyone of them touched the elephant.  "Hey, the elephant is a pillar," said the first man who touched his leg.  "Oh, no! it is like a rope," said the second man who touched the tail.  "Oh, no! it is like a thick branch of a tree," said the third man who touched the trunk of the elephant.  "It is like a big hand fan" said the fourth man who touched the ear of the elephant.  "It is like a huge wall," said the fifth man who touched the belly of the elephant.  "It is like a solid pipe," Said the sixth man who touched the tusk of the elephant.  They began to argue about the elephant and everyone of them insisted that he was right. It looked like they were getting agitated. A wise man was passing by and he saw this. He stopped and asked them, "What is the matter?" They said, "We cannot agree to what the elephant is like." Each one of them told what he thought the elephant was like. The wise man calmly explained to them, "All of you are right. The reason every one of you is telling it differently because each one of you touched the different part of the elephant. So, actually the elephant has all those features what you all said."  "Oh!" everyone said. There was no more fight. They felt happy that they were all right.  The moral of the story is that there may be some truth to what someone says. Sometimes we can see that truth and sometimes not because they may have different perspective which we may not agree too. So, rather than arguing like the blind men, we should say, "Maybe you have your reasons." This way we don’t get in arguments. 


    Blind Men and the Elephant – A Poem by John Godfrey Saxe Here is John Godfrey Saxe’s (1816-1887) version of Blind Men and the Elephant: It was six men of Indostan, To learning much inclined,  Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind),  That each by observation Might satisfy his mind.  The First approach'd the Elephant,  And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side,  At once began to bawl:  "God bless me! but the Elephant Is very like a wall!"  The Second, feeling of the tusk,  Cried, -"Ho! what have we here So very round and smooth and sharp?  To me 'tis mighty clear,  This wonder of an Elephant Is very like a spear!"  The Third approach'd the animal,  And happening to take The squirming trunk within his hands,  Thus boldly up and spake:  "I see," -quoth he- "the Elephant Is very like a snake!"  The Fourth reached out an eager hand,  And felt about the knee:  "What most this wondrous beast is like Is mighty plain," -quoth he,-  "'Tis clear enough the Elephant  Is very like a tree!"  The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,  Said- "E'en the blindest man Can tell what this resembles most;  Deny the fact who can,  This marvel of an Elephant Is very like a fan!"  The Sixth no sooner had begun About the beast to grope,  Then, seizing on the swinging tail That fell within his scope,  "I see," -quoth he,- "the Elephant Is very like a rope!"  And so these men of Indostan Disputed loud and long,  Each in his own opinion Exceeding stiff and strong,  Though each was partly in the right,  And all were in the wrong!  MORAL,  So, oft in theologic wars  The disputants, I ween,  Rail on in utter ignorance  Of what each other mean;  And prate about an Elephant  Not one of them has seen!
  • It should be easy to address all those customer priorities, right? We can measure EVERYTHING & ultimately become data driven about everything we do….(in real time)….

    RIGHT?
    WRONG….
  • Being data ‘driven’ implies the data is in charge….. with the best will in the world, data is open to interpretation (think the fable of the elephant again…) One could argue they were being data ‘driven’ but they weren’t being ‘data smart’.

    Think about how data can make your business smarter and don’t delegate the responsibility. Being data smart requires a smart data strategy – how well does your data reflect your customers’ ecosystem?
  • It’s as important to recognize what is NOT there as well as what IS? The absence of something is as important and meaningful as the presence of something.
  • We have found that less than 5% of social conversations mention a product or a brand
  • We need to make sure we’re not like the blind men….but we express insight in the way customers reflect it across the 3 Cs to reflect the customer reality and to inspire us to act. There are a few rules of thumb we use to help us understand the mix of the 3 to use:
  • What if we built for the next generation of customers now? Designing new products/services for the next gen of luxury travelers. Our client is an expert in luxury travel. Inside and out. They know what is interesting to this man. (picture boomer) What they told us they didn’t know anything about is the next generation of travelers. The emerging affluent. We all agreed it would be imperative to build our new offering and brand so that it could scale to this traveler. Once again, we started with baseline interviews. This time with travel specialists – classically trained agents, experts who had owned their own companies, museum exploration leaders and of course bloggers. Excited about our learning we turned to social data to explore the findings in more detail…..
  • Nothing. Crickets. And that’s why it’s so important to understand the customer context….rather than thinking ‘the data isn’t there’ was asked ourselves the question…, “Maybe they’re speaking another language…” Which is exactly what happened. As often is the case with affluents, we found them rarely writing about their vacation experiences via social media. When they do chat, they are obtuse or keep their pages highly private. So, how to get around it?
  • We’ve talked a lot in the past about monitoring facebook/twitter and the problems inherent in that. This is an interesting case of how Facebook can actually help us find people: o First, the team targeted Facebook and Twitter followers of extreme luxury travel brands (for example, the Elite Traveler Magazine’s social sites) o Then, they conducted personal profile analysis and hash tag identification on thousands of profiles o They manually combed major picture sites – namely Instagram, Pinterest, and Tumblr Blogs. This audience is HIGHLY involved – taking brag-worthy experiences to the next level – by actually showing everyone in pictures what they are missing.
  • By searching for relevant hashtags we could zoom in on the correct audience and get into the topic in great depth. #exotic #bejealous #grateful #livingthedream o And the answers began to stream in So, what did we learn once we’d found them? We’ve all talked about the recession generated currency of experience but this category really brings that to life. And both boomers and millennials learned one key thing from the recession - material goods can be gone in a flash. But what you experience in life is priceless.

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