Crash Course Design Thinking - by @arnoutsmeets

51.483 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

How to re-frame business problems to customer-centric opportunity spaces that drive value. Design thinking is your shortcut to customer empathy. A good understanding on how this method could help you identify real customer problems and unmet needs is essential. Moreover we will share techniques and tools that you can implement directly after this crash course. Start inventing the future.

Veröffentlicht in: Design
5 Kommentare
222 Gefällt mir
Statistik
Notizen
Keine Downloads
Aufrufe
Aufrufe insgesamt
51.483
Auf SlideShare
0
Aus Einbettungen
0
Anzahl an Einbettungen
23.460
Aktionen
Geteilt
0
Downloads
1.900
Kommentare
5
Gefällt mir
222
Einbettungen 0
Keine Einbettungen

Keine Notizen für die Folie

Crash Course Design Thinking - by @arnoutsmeets

  1. 1. Design Thinking crash course 3 tools to work on customer empathy by www.boardofinnovation.com pic flickr cc kheelcenter
  2. 2. subtitle Design Thinking = Innovative problem solving
  3. 3. big unknownsknown unknownsknown knowns 321 You know how to solve them. You know ways to find out how to solve them. You don’t know how to solve them because you don’t know the root cause. There are 3 types of problems Source: Adapted from A. Millenson
  4. 4. I gave a free online crash course on Design Thinking through Hangout 8 December 2015 Pssst, before I forget.. Replay here
  5. 5. big unknownsknown unknownsknown knowns 321 There are 3 types of problems blindspots You know how to solve them. You know ways to find out how to solve them. You don’t know how to solve them because you don’t know the root cause. Source: Adapted from A. Millenson
  6. 6. your view Your blindspots Blindspots are the sweet spots for innovation. Take on a larger point of view by engaging in conversations with your customers. Understanding their view will make you understand the root cause of their problem. A lot of opportunities!
  7. 7. There are 3 types of problems big unknownsknown unknownsknown knowns 321 Not all types of problems are best suited for a Design Thinking approach! You know how to solve them. You know ways to find out how to solve them. You don’t know how to solve them because you don’t know the root cause.
  8. 8. known knowns 1 Bad weather during flight. Switch off auto-pilot.
  9. 9. known knowns 1 Bad weather during flight. Switch off auto-pilot. execution & implementation checklist thinking required activities required mindset
  10. 10. known knowns 1 Bad weather during flight. Switch off auto-pilot. known unknowns 2 My smartphone crashed. What could have caused this? execution & implementation checklist thinking required activities required mindset
  11. 11. known knowns 1 test, search, sort, solve analytical thinking required activities required mindset known unknowns 2 execution & implementation checklist thinking required activities required mindset Bad weather during flight. Switch off auto-pilot. My smartphone crashed. What could have caused this?
  12. 12. known knowns 1 Bad weather during flight. Switch off auto-pilot. known unknowns 2 My smartphone crashed. What could have caused this? big unknowns 3 Customer ignores my product. How can I understand why? execution & implementation checklist thinking required activities required mindset test, search, sort, solve analytical thinking required activities required mindset
  13. 13. known knowns 1 Bad weather during flight. Switch off auto-pilot. known unknowns 2 My smartphone crashed. What could have caused this? big unknowns 3 Customer ignores my product. How can I understand why? immersion, engagement Design Thinking required activities required mindset test, search, sort, solve analytical thinking required activities required mindset execution & implementation checklist thinking required activities required mindset
  14. 14. 5 tips on how to identify big unknowns
  15. 15. You are highly unfamiliar with the customers/market needs You have little sense of likely outcomes You have not seen this type of problem before You have no hypotheses to test (yet)! Your usual source of data and analytics will not clearly help you find a solution 1 2 3 4 5 5 tips on how to identify big unknowns
  16. 16. Design Thinking Lean Start-up Agile Execute Problem solving doing the thing right Problem finding doing the right thing Design Thinking helps you with solving the right problems Source: Design of Thinking, J, Schmiedgen
  17. 17. Design Thinking Lean Start-up Agile Execute Problem solving doing the thing right Problem finding doing the right thing 3 major steps to create business value Explore Test Execute customer/problem fit problem/solution fit product/market fit
  18. 18. 3 major steps to create business value Invent the future. Discover unmet needs of your customer and unsolved problems that he wants solved. Collect insights through immersion and observation. Test your ideas and hypothesis. Prototype and see how consumers react on it. Adjust product, pricing or positioning accordingly. Bring the product to life. Identify the activities, capabilities and resources you need to make the product a reality. Explore Test Execute customer/problem fit problem/solution fit product/market fit
  19. 19. 3 major steps to create business value Test your ideas and hypothesis. Prototype and see how consumers react on it. Adjust product, pricing or positioning accordingly. Bring the product to life. Identify the activities, capabilities and resources you need to make the product a reality. Re-frame business problems to customer-centric opportunity spaces that drive value = invention of business Explore Test Execute customer/problem fit problem/solution fit product/market fit Invent the future. Discover unmet needs of your customer and unsolved problems that he wants solved. Collect insights through immersion and observation.
  20. 20. Administration of business Invention of business What corporates are good at. What corporates often fail to do! Source: The Design of Business, R. Martin
  21. 21. Exploitation Static knowledge Short-term Incremental steps Minimal risk Predictable smaller rewards Analysis, reasoning, data from the past, mastery Exploration Dynamic knowledge Long-term Significant leaps forward High risk Potentially high rewards Intuition, feeling, hypothese of the future, originality Administration of business Invention of business Source: The Design of Business, R. Martin
  22. 22. How to identify real problems? Exploration
  23. 23. We don’t need more useless products. In order to avoid building products or services that nobody will use, we have to solve real problems. If the problem is non-existent, the solution becomes meaningless.
  24. 24. “If I had an hour to solve a problem, I'd spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and 5 minutes thinking about solutions.” A. Einstein
  25. 25. First identify the root cause of your problem
  26. 26. Remember? First identify the root cause of your problem “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?”
  27. 27. First identify the root cause of your problem e.g. bag of ice-cubes “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?”
  28. 28. First identify the root cause of your problem e.g. bag of ice-cubes “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?” Because she doesn’t like buying it. 1
  29. 29. First identify the root cause of your problem e.g. bag of ice-cubes “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?” Because she doesn’t like buying it. Because she doesn’t like other products in her bag to get wet. 1 2 Why?
  30. 30. First identify the root cause of your problem e.g. bag of ice-cubes “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?” Because she doesn’t like buying it. Because she doesn’t like other products in her bag to get wet. Because this affects other products and she doesn’t like that. 1 2 3 Why? Why?
  31. 31. First identify the root cause of your problem e.g. bag of ice-cubes “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?” Because she doesn’t like buying it. Because she doesn’t like other products in her bag to get wet. Because this affects other products and she doesn’t like that. Because she doesn’t want to pay for products in wet packaging. 1 2 3 4 Why? Why? Why?
  32. 32. First identify the root cause of your problem e.g. bag of ice-cubes “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?” Because she only wants to pay for quality. Because she doesn’t want to pay for products in wet packaging. 1 2 3 4 5 Why? Why? Why? Why? Because she doesn’t like buying it. Because she doesn’t like other products in her bag to get wet. Because this affects other products and she doesn’t like that.
  33. 33. First identify the root cause of your problem e.g. bag of ice-cubes “Customer ignores my product in store? Why?” Because she doesn’t like buying it. Because she doesn’t like other products in her bag to get wet. Because she only wants to pay for quality. Because this affects other products and she doesn’t like that. Because she doesn’t want to pay for products in wet packaging. 1 2 3 4 5 Counter measure: position ice-cube bags at the register to be sold after walking through shop
  34. 34. helps to dig deeper into the problem of a user experience iterative questioning to explore cause-effect looking for the root cause of a problem 5 iterations are typically enough to provide anticipated insights 1 2 3 4 5 Why’s Method Perfect warm-up for Design Thinking!
  35. 35. “Design Thinking helps you with identifying the root cause of a problem.” It’s called CUSTOMER EMPATHY.
  36. 36. Let’s go to Zambia & help them set up local agriculture to foster economic development! TED talk - Ernesto Sirolli Click on me! Let’s learn from Ernesto’s Story
  37. 37. 3 shortcuts to customer empathy TRY - Immersion 1 LOOK - Observation 2 ASK - Engagement 3
  38. 38. 3 shortcuts to customer empathy Immerse yourself in the experience of others Figuratively wear many hats. Try to experience the same as your customer does. Uncover hurdles, pains, inconveniences, etc. TRY - Immersion 1 LOOK - Observation 2 ASK - Engagement 3
  39. 39. 3 shortcuts to customer empathy Immerse yourself in the experience of others TRY - Immersion 1 LOOK - Observation 2 ASK - Engagement 3 Observe what people do From a distance, try to capture insights about your customer. Stay unobtrusive and almost invisible for the sake of spotting when the problem occurs. Figuratively wear many hats. Try to experience the same as your customer does. Uncover hurdles, pains, inconveniences, etc.
  40. 40. 3 shortcuts to customer empathy TRY - Immersion 1 LOOK - Observation 2 ASK - Engagement 3 Capture what people say they do Only one rule applies: engagement should take place in the real environment. Make people feel comfortable while you are documenting. Immerse yourself in the experience of others Observe what people do From a distance, try to capture insights about your customer. Stay unobtrusive and almost invisible for the sake of spotting when the problem occurs. Figuratively wear many hats. Try to experience the same as your customer does. Uncover hurdles, pains, inconveniences, etc.
  41. 41. 3 shortcuts to customer empathy Immerse yourself in the experience of others TRY - Immersion 1 LOOK - Observation 2 ASK - Engagement 3 Observe what people do Capture what people say they do Often not the same ;)
  42. 42. Some examples
  43. 43. MRI scans require a person not to move, but little kids cry and move around. TRY - Immersion 1
  44. 44. MRI scans require a person not to move, but little kids cry and move around. TRY - Immersion 1 By immersing in the experience of a kid they learned that …
  45. 45. MRI scans require a person not to move, but little kids cry and move around. TRY - Immersion 1 … for a kid an MRI room must be a very stressful and a frightening experience. By immersing in the experience of a kid they learned that … valuable insight!
  46. 46. MRI scans require a person not to move, but little kids cry and move around. TRY - Immersion 1 … for a kid an MRI room must be a very stressful and a frightening experience. By immersing in the experience of a kid they learned that … Kid-friendly MRI. Simple commands to get the scan done accurately become part of an adventure. SOLUTION Source: GE
  47. 47. Big brewery notices consumption in bars is low, while beer is popular in store. LOOK - Observation 2
  48. 48. Big brewery notices consumption in bars is low, while beer is popular in stores. LOOK - Observation 2 By observing the people’s behaviour in the bars, they learned …
  49. 49. Big brewery notices consumption in bars is low, while beer is popular in store. LOOK - Observation 2 … waiting staff is not serving beer with great enthusiasm because they are tired of long shifts. By observing the people’s behaviour in the bars, they learned … valuable insight!
  50. 50. Big brewery notices consumption in bars is low, while beer is popular in store. LOOK - Observation 2 … waiting staff is not serving beer with great delight because they are tired of long shifts. By observing the people’s behaviour in the bars, they learned … Pick-up service offered by brewery so waiting staff is quicker at work and back home. SOLUTION Source: An anthropologist walks into a bar, HBR 2014 March Issue
  51. 51. Water wells installed by NGO’s are not being used. ASK - Engagement 3
  52. 52. Water wells installed by NGO’s are not being used. ASK - Engagement 3 Through engaging in their environment, they learned..
  53. 53. Water wells installed by NGO’s are not being used. ASK - Engagement 3 The road to the water wells is long and the water barrels too heavy. Through engaging in their environment, they learned.. valuable insight!
  54. 54. Water wells installed by NGO’s are not being used. ASK - Engagement 3 The road to the water wells is long and the water barrels too heavy. Through engaging in their environment, they learned.. 90 litre Hippo Roller enables user to collect 5 times more water than a single bucket + improved water access. SOLUTION Source: Hippo Roller
  55. 55. Thank you! arnout@boardofinnovation.com Let’s connect!

×