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The Clinician's Role in Developing a Patient Experience Strategy

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The Clinician's Role in Developing a Patient Experience Strategy

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Learn how clinicians and marketing consultants can work together to develop a patient experience strategy that enables team to work at the highest levels and achieve outstanding results.

Learn how clinicians and marketing consultants can work together to develop a patient experience strategy that enables team to work at the highest levels and achieve outstanding results.

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The Clinician's Role in Developing a Patient Experience Strategy

  1. 1. The Clinician’s Role in Developing a Patient Experience Strategy Jake Poore, Integrated Loyalty Systems & Suzanne Hendery, Baystate Health
  2. 2. 2 Jake Poore President & Chief Experience Officer Integrated Loyalty Systems, Inc., Orlando, FL Suzanne Hendery, MA Vice President Marketing & Communications Baystate Health Integrated Loyalty Systems Solutions for Elevating the Human Side of HealthcareSM
  3. 3. 3 Learning Objectives • Recognize that for a patient experience design to be successful, clinicians must be involved throughout the process and share a high sense of ownership in the outcomes. • Hear firsthand accounts from the employee perspective of lessons learned and best practices that had a direct impact on the successes and opportunities that surfaced when opening Baystate’s new center.
  4. 4. 4 About Baystate Health • Baystate Health, a Top 15 Integrated Delivery System of three hospitals, including Baystate Medical Center, the largest hospital outside of Boston and the Western Campus of Tufts University School of Medicine.
  5. 5. 5 • Vision: “Baystate Health will transform the delivery and financing o health care to provide a high quality, affordable, integrated and patient- centered system of care that will serve as a model for the nation.”
  6. 6. 6 Project Background... The Baystate Breast & Wellness Center is the natural evolution of a partnership between the two premier breast programs in western Massachusetts: Radiology & Imaging, and Baystate Health’s Comprehensive Breast Center.
  7. 7. 7 Our Challenge Baystate Comprehensive Breast Center Baystate Comprehensive Breast Center Radiology & Imaging (2 sites) Radiology & Imaging (2 sites) Baystate Breast & Wellness Center Baystate Breast & Wellness Center Patient Experiences that Consistently Exceed Expectations Patient Experiences that Consistently Exceed Expectations
  8. 8. 8 Our Approach Baystate Comprehensive Breast Center Baystate Comprehensive Breast Center Radiology & Imaging Radiology & Imaging Baystate Breast & Wellness Center Baystate Breast & Wellness Center Patient Experiences that Consistently Exceed Expectations Patient Experiences that Consistently Exceed Expectations
  9. 9. 9 Our Approach Patient Experiences that Consistently Exceed Expectations Patient Experiences that Consistently Exceed Expectations • To achieve our goals, we had to involve leaders, clinicians and staff on the designing the patient experience FIRST... ... then, with everyone aligned toward the same goal, we could create an effective team...
  10. 10. 10 ... and avoid any “turf battles.”
  11. 11. 11 Volume Goals 50,000 Total Procedures (maintain) •Mammo Screening •Mammo DX •Biopsies Comprehensive Breast Center & Radiology & Imaging (2 Sites)
  12. 12. 12 Clinical & Marketing Partnership Patient Experience Role (Jake) Patient Experience-Marketer Role (Suzanne) Vision for program; leadership Vision for patient engagement; service culture Interest in patient experience as differentiator; selected consultant Met with referring MDs; listened, implemented changes, coached, 1:1 communications Drafted “latest milestone” newsletters, distribution to MDs & staff Supplied questions for patient input. Made priority for all committees. Conducted patient focus groups. Video highlights. Planned, facilitated, co-led Patient Experience retreats; planned strategy, had weekly update meetings. Set expectations for MDs, staff. Advocated with CEOs, CMO, VPs. Communicated commitments and results. Planned campaign and creative. Availability. Shared metrics. Delivered on promises.
  13. 13. 13 A Guiding Philosophy “In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it.” - Michelangelo Release the unique strengths that already exist within an organization’s culture, rather than try to impose one from the C suite or outside.
  14. 14. 14 Identifying the Construction Crew
  15. 15. 15 Six Pillars of Cultural Transformation AssessAssess & Define& Define CultureCulture Comm.Comm. CampaignCampaign Leaders’Leaders’ ToolkitToolkit NewNew EmployeeEmployee OrientationOrientation RewardReward & Recog.& Recog. On-the-On-the- JobJob TrainingTraining ACCOUNTABILITYACCOUNTABILITY Rounding Performance Evaluations Coaching
  16. 16. 16 Clinicians and staff who defined the “blue prints” own the culture. Smile & make eye contact. Smile & make eye contact. Sit at ptSit at pt level.level. ““Belly buttons.”Belly buttons.” VoiceVoice tone.tone. Explain inExplain in plainplain language...language... no jargon.no jargon.
  17. 17. 17 We Asked Patients...
  18. 18. 18 We Identified Our “True North”
  19. 19. 19 We Identified Our “Graffiti”
  20. 20. 20 We Identified Operational Priorities 60% 30% 9% 1% Safety Efficiency Competency Courtesy • Patient satisfaction surveys reflect what matters most to patients: – Efficiency / Speed – Safety – Competency (my job tasks) – Courtesy /Compassion
  21. 21. 21 We Agreed on Our Priorities... 1. Safety 2.Compassi on 3. Expertise 4. Time- sensitivity 1. Safety 2.Compassi on 3. Expertise 4. Time- sensitivity
  22. 22. 22 And How to Use Those Priorities 1.. 2. 3. 4. Safety Time-sensitivity Expertise Compassion “True North”
  23. 23. 23 Six Pillars of Cultural Transformation AssessAssess & Define& Define CultureCulture Comm.Comm. CampaignCampaign Leaders’Leaders’ ToolkitToolkit NewNew EmployeeEmployee OrientationOrientation RewardReward & Recog.& Recog. On-the-On-the- JobJob TrainingTraining ACCOUNTABILITYACCOUNTABILITY Rounding Performance Evaluations Coaching Clinicians involved in each pillar... ...and accountable to leaders, staf & each other.
  24. 24. 24 Leaders trained clinicians and staff
  25. 25. Year to Year “Snap shot” Volumes 10/11-9/12 vs 10/12-9/13 10/11-9/12 vs 10/12-9/13 10/11-9/12 vs 10/12- 9/13 • Screening mammography stable (no loss of patients despite move) • Diagnostic mammo up 20% • Biopsies up 98%
  26. 26. 26 Goal: #1 in Patient Satisfaction at Baystate Health At 6 months: #5
  27. 27. 27 • Goal: #1 in Patient Satisfaction Now, 1 yr: #1! (time to celebrate with staff!)
  28. 28. 28 Lessons Learned: Transforming Culture 1. Have a clear, simple blueprint. 2. Help each employee understand their role. Constant communication. Leaders need to be present and accessible. –Lots of listening –1:1 time –Repetition, repetition, repetition –Reinforcement—be specific –Celebrate success 1. Get people ‘off the bus’ if they do not believe. 2. Stress and reward collaboration and teamwork. 3. If you are not caring for a patient, you should be caring for someone who is. 4. Never take your eye off the ball. Share metrics, accountability. 5. Do not underestimate the amount of time this takes!
  29. 29. 29 “Warm Welcomes” for Staff & Patients
  30. 30. 30 Clinicians & staff collaborated to design consistent patient greetings.
  31. 31. 31 Clinicians developed ways to better address the “time-sensitivity” priority.
  32. 32. 32 Everyone collaborated to make the facility more “patient-driven.”
  33. 33. 33 Every interaction begins and ends on the “human” level.
  34. 34. 34 Integrated Loyalty Systems Solutions for Elevating the Human Side of HealthcareSM Jake.Poore@WeCreateLoyalty.com 407.859.2826 Suzanne.Hendery@bhs.org 413.794.7652 THANK YOU! THANK YOU!
  35. 35. 35 Suzanne Hendery, MA - Biography • Suzanne serves as Vice President, Marketing and Communications for Baystate Health, a Top 100 Integrated Delivery System of three hospitals. Baystate Health is the health care leader in Western Massachusetts and one of the largest employers with 300 employed physicians and 10,000 employees. Suzanne oversees an in-house marketing and communications agency of 25 professionals. Over the last 20 years the team that has achieved national recognition for their innovative communications and focus on the patient and family. Personally, she is dedicated to creating a team and communications that are "Best of Class" and works to create a collaborative work environment where staff can grow, contribute and share in the satisfaction of a job well done. Suzanne has a Master's Degree in Marketing Communications from The University of Connecticut and a Bachelor's Degree in Media Systems and Management from Westfield State University.
  36. 36. 36 Jake Poore - Biography • Jake is president and chief experience officer of Integrated Loyalty Systems, an Orlando-based firm that specializes in healthcare strategy development, cultural transformation, service development, process improvement, the physical architecture of service and leadership development around the theme of service excellence. Mr. Poore spends most of his time with his sleeves rolled up in the trenches of healthcare institutions. You may find him shadowing a physician in the emergency department at 3 a.m., learning of the needs of the sterile processing department, interviewing patients and family members, or facilitating a training class with staff and leaders. Previously, Mr. Poore spent more than 18 years with The Walt Disney Company in various roles at Disney University Leadership Development and Disney Institute, where he established and led the Healthcare division. He has been a member of ACHE Faculty for the past 5 years.

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Suzanne[intro]
    Jake[intro]
  • EitherHere are the learning objectives for the session as stated in your program.
  • SuzanneEric, here’s an updated slide– please feel free to enlarge it. Here’s a little background on Baystate Health. Baystate Health is the health care leader in Western Massachusetts with an insurance plan (HNE) and one of the largest employers with 400 employed physicians and 10,000 employees.
  • SuzanneOur stated vision is...
  • Suzanne[explanation of the acquisition and the challenge it created]
  • JakeSo the challenge was to bring these two different entities together and form the new “Baystate Breast & Wellness Center” that would help fulfill the Baystate Health vision and consistently deliver great patient experiences.
    But we took a slightly different approach than the one in the diagram, which we’ll cover in this session...
  • JakeWe decided that the most effective approach would be focus on the patient experience FIRST, and then the newly united Breast & Wellness Center would emerge as a result.
  • JakeWe had to involve everyone...
  • JakeBecause we didn’t want any “rumbles” in the beautiful new hallways. We wanted to make sure that the “Sharks” and the “Jets” from the two previously competing organizations, would ultimately form an effective unit.
    SuzanneThere was quite a lot involved in the acquisition, which is probably worth a whole other session. Staff from Radiology & Imaging had to re-interview for their positions in the new Breast & Wellness Center. Rewrote job descriptions, set new pay scales, new benefits, new technology, new workspace, new workflow... all of it had its own set of challenges...
  • SuzanneUltimately, we had to be sure that all of these changes took place, and we had to do it while at least maintaining the total volume of procedures.
  • SuzanneOur leadership team knew we had to tackle it from two key sides: We had to make it work from a strategic, business aspect, and we had to be sure that the clinicians and staff were behind it, operationally. We had to form a new culture for the new center... one that wasn’t exclusively Baystate Health’s (which would alienate the new R&I employees), yet it still had to “fit” as part of the overall Baystate Health mission and vision. That required a perspective that we simply didn’t have on our own. That’s why we partnered with Jake and the ILS team.
  • JakeWe’ve never seen any sustained success where an organization’s culture is imposed, either from the C-suite or from consultants who ultimately get on a plane and go on to the next challenge. Sure, there might be some short-term success, but ultimately, if it’s not grown “organically” in the grassroots of the organization, it will fail. That’s why our approach is like the story of Michaelangelo’s David....
    [story]
    So we had to get our “construction crew” together... the grassroots group of clinicians, leaders and staff who would ultimately “release David from the rock.”
  • SuzanneWe assembled a group of more than 40 clinicians, leaders, front-line staff, patients and community advocates to design & develop this new Breast & Wellness Center patient-driven culture. The mix of titles and departments included.... [examples of titles and roles]
  • JakeThrough firsthand experience with our clients, we know that there are 6 key pillars and a foundation of Accountability required for a successful cultural transformation. We’re continuing to work our way through all of the pillars and the Accountability (we’re through the first four), and today we’re going to focus on that first one on the left.
    To successfully define something as “fuzzy” as an organization’s culture, the group was challenged to create a set of virtual “blueprints” that would define “the way we do things here” in the new Breast & Wellness Center.
  • JakeWe challenged the group to put together a set of instructions so that in any given situation, a staff member -- clinical or non-clinical -- would know exactly what to do... always... consistently... because that’s what counts.
    We would define the important different aspects of patient (and internal customer) interactions. Things like.... [list behaviors and examples]
  • JakeWith that as a challenge, the “construction crew” had to hear from patients, who we had talked to recently in focus groups....
  • JakeTogether, we identified a single, unifying “True North” statement for the new center.... I have extra fold up note cards we can distribute– they are impressive!
    Having this “True North” statement makes clear what everyone will stand for, and what they won’t stand for, going forward.
  • SuzanneWe identified some of what they wouldn’t stand for in the new center and called it “graffiti.” This is the physical clutter, cords, paper signs, trash... that would have no place in the beautiful new center.... And it would also include “verbal graffiti” or the things we never want to hear in the center, like “it’s not my job,” or “no.”
  • JakeTo help create a truly patient-driven culture, we identified what matters most to patients in terms of their priorities when they come to us....Suzanne to add story about Fri schedulers not calling patients for call-backs until Monday– and seeing them that day, to reduce anxiety and worry.
  • JakeWe ultimately agreed on the four “patient-driven care priorities” that would help ensure everyone remained aligned to that “true north.”
    The four priorities everyone agreed to are....
  • JakeIt was also agreed that those Priorities would be applied consistently, throughout the Breast & Wellness Center. That’s an important consideration... “Compassion” is second only to patient safety in terms of priorities.... Suzanne, so staff discussed not having an MD interrupt an assistant on the phone with a patient or referrer, unless it made this list of priorities!
  • SuzanneAt each step, our clinicians, our leaders and our staff have been clear about who created this patient-experience strategy, who “owns” it, and how they have and will continue to hold themselves and each other accountable for the culture they designed and created. We are also clear about what “success” looks like and what metrics will be measured up front (patient sat, new patients, employee engagement?) —so that everyone clearly sees the goal and can celebrate success.
  • SuzanneOne of the most visible ways we reinforced that idea is that we had clinical and non-clinical leaders train the staff in how to follow the “blueprints.” They explained what everyone agreed would be “the way we do things here” and who created it. They’ve incorporated those blueprints into their staff meetings and into their recognition programs. Seeing clinical leaders standing up and saying: “I support this... we’re going to hold each other accountable for this” was important and much more impactful than simply having Jake and his team conduct a series of training classes. For many leaders, this was the “scariest” part—but was most important for credibility and positioning them as leaders. They also got the most positive feedback for this action.
  • In terms of revenue, we are $500,000 ahead of last year, without adding any additional expense. In terms of Gallup physician and staff engagement scores, we are in the process of measuring that now.
  • SuzanneThe scores at the Breast & Wellness Center have been impressive....
  • Suzanne & Jake
    [step through numbered list]
  • Suzanne[time permitting, explain the photo]
  • Jake[time permitting, explain the photo]
  • Jake[time permitting, explain the photo]
  • Suzanne[time permitting, explain the photo]
  • Jake[time permitting, explain the photo]

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