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Content Creation Best Practices & The Problem With Editorial Calendars

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As of 2015, 89% of content marketers are focused on creating more engaging, higher quality content currently or within the next 12 months. And while intentions seem promising, prospects don't look too good. Two-thirds of content marketers admit that they either don’t have a strategy or that their plans live in a separate, stand-alone document (a.k.a. an Editorial Calendar). It’s a content crisis! That was the genesis of Jack Morton’s March 15, 2015 SXSW Interactive Workshop: “Why Editorial Calendars Make Your Content SUCK.”

In this presentation, a distinction is drawn between use of Editorial Calendars for content organization (which is a great use of the tool) versus content creation (which can lead to content that is not-so-great). Three alternative means of content creation and ideation are suggested: 1) consumer-inspired; 2) data-driven; and 3) conversation-led. Examples of content that fell short and content that soared are also provided in order to move marketers beyond thinking inside editorial boxes so that they can do something extraordinary.

Veröffentlicht in: Marketing

Content Creation Best Practices & The Problem With Editorial Calendars

  1. S U C K
  2. Hello Ben Grossman VP, Strategy Director Jack Morton Worldwide e: ben_grossman@jackmorton.com m: 617.752.1171 t: @BenGrossman w: www.ben-grossman.com Read our blog: jackmorton.com/blog Follow us on twitter: @jackmorton Visit us online: www.jackmorton.com
  3. T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S Content Marketing Landscape S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 New Content Creation Models S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Examining Editorial Calendars S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  4. Content Marketing Landscape S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 New Content Creation Models S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Examining Editorial Calendars S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S
  5. T H E C O N T E N T M A R K E T I N G L A N D S C A P E
  6. What is content marketing?
  7. What is content marketing? A strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience— and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action. Content Marketing Institute
  8. By 2020, customers will manage 85% of their relationships without talking to a human. Gartner Prediction
  9. of marketers will be creating more content in 2015. 69 CMI, 2015 %
  10. of all content marketers struggle to produce engaging content. Half Marketing Profs, 2015
  11. of content marketers admit that they either don’t have a strategy or that plans live in a separate, stand-alone document. 2/3 Smart Insights, 2015
  12. 77 % say they are not successful in tracking the ROI of their content programs. CMI, 2015
  13. 89 % of content marketers are focused on creating more engaging, higher quality content now or within the next 12 months. CMI, 2015
  14. Content Marketing Landscape S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 New Content Creation Models S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Examining Editorial Calendars S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S
  15. Content Marketing Landscape S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 New Content Creation Models S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Examining Editorial Calendars S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S
  16. So what exactly is an Editorial Calendar?
  17. Depends who you ask. So what exactly is an Editorial Calendar?
  18. 14 15 16 T H E E D I T O R I A L C A L E N D A R
  19. 14 16 T H E E D I T O R I A L C A L E N D A R Often a spreadsheet, calendar, or digital tool ... 15
  20. 14 15 16 T H E E D I T O R I A L C A L E N D A R Often a spreadsheet, calendar, or digital tool ... ... that ensures a constant flow of content is being posted to digital channels.
  21. 14 15 T H E E D I T O R I A L C A L E N D A R Often a spreadsheet, calendar, or digital tool ... ... that ensures a constant flow of content is being posted to digital channels. Many times they focus on dates, topics, headlines, authors, owners, content status and categories.
  22. Our beef with Editorial Calendars?
  23. It’s not about the tool (to be honest). It’s how you use it. Our beef with Editorial Calendars?
  24. Editorial Calendars* can put an undue emphasis on filling in blanks, rather than accomplishing business objectives and resonating with audiences.
  25. Editorial Calendars* can put an undue emphasis on filling in blanks, rather than accomplishing business objectives and resonating with audiences. Some organizations appropriately, use Editorial Calendars to capture much more than the basics, including objectives, metrics and strategic guidance. *
  26. Similarly, some brands assume content can do anything (or should do everything). That’s not so.
  27. Similarly, some brands assume content can do anything (or should do everything). That’s not so. Is content in or out? 1. Define business objectives 2. Understand target audience 3. Creative ideation process 4. Assemble communications plan 5. Decide whether content is part of the proper communications plan to meet objectives
  28. Side effects of Editorial Calendars include...
  29. Death by obscure holidays
  30. Death by obscure holidays March 15th is: National Buzzards Day Brutus Day True Confessions Day Incredible Kids Day World Consumer Rights Day Ides of March National Peanut Lovers Day Pears Helene Day
  31. Does your brand really need to celebrate #PancakeDay?
  32. Hideous spreadsheets
  33. Could there be a less inspiring format for your content?
  34. Gimmicky efforts to “bulk up“ your editorial calendar
  35. Does anything sound less strategic?
  36. Let’s break it down.
  37. V S . What Editorial Calendars are good at…
  38. V S . What Editorial Calendars are good at… What Editorial Calendars suck at…
  39. Ordering chaos Submitting for legal approvals Project management Gathering input and creating buy-in Introducing discipline What Editorial Calendars are good at:
  40. V S . C O N T E N T O R G A N I Z A T I O N EDITORIAL CALENDARS ARE GOOD AT:
  41. Breaking through Creating omni-channel ideas Being agile/opportunistic Protecting audiences Motivating creativity What Editorial Calendars suck at:
  42. C O N T E N T O R G A N I Z A T I O N V S . C O N T E N T C R E A T I O N EDITORIAL CALENDARS ARE GOOD AT: EDITORIAL CALENDARS SUCK AT:
  43. One other risk: The practice of optimizing at a granular, surface level (on a per-post basis). —
  44. One other risk: The practice of optimizing at a granular, surface level (on a per-post basis). — This leads brands to create shallow, widely appealing content simply to achieve positive engagement rates (lots of likes, comments and shares). In so doing, they can lose sight of the brand’s larger objectives.
  45. “You need to find guardrails. If we base our spend purely on optimizing engagement, 10% of our content will drive 90% of engagement. But that may not suit our strategic priorities. Downstream value doesn’t register as quickly.” – Luke Kintigh Global Content and Media Strategist, Intel
  46. Benefits of thinking beyond the Editorial Calendar:
  47. • True optimization • Increased response rates • First-mover advantage Media efficiencyBenefits of thinking beyond the Editorial Calendar:
  48. • True optimization • Increased response rates • First-mover advantage Media efficiency • Right time, right audience • Content that builds • Objective-driven calls to action Customer lifecycle value Benefits of thinking beyond the Editorial Calendar:
  49. • Pass-along value • Unique, compelling point of view • Experience beyond consumption Brand Differentiation • True optimization • Increased response rates • First-mover advantage Media efficiency • Right time, right audience • Content that builds • Objective-driven calls to action Customer lifecycle value Benefits of thinking beyond the Editorial Calendar:
  50. Content Marketing Landscape S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 New Content Creation Models S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Examining Editorial Calendars S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S
  51. Content Marketing Landscape S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 New Content Creation Models S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Examining Editorial Calendars S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S
  52. How do you create content that doesn’t suck?
  53. Do something extraordinary. — How do you create content that doesn’t suck?
  54. Extraordinary content starts with an extraordinary idea. —
  55. Extraordinary content starts with an extraordinary idea. —(Not with a series of boxes on a page.)
  56. Extraordinary content starts with an extraordinary idea. —(Not with a series of boxes on a page.)
  57. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  58. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  59. Ask three questions C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D
  60. 1What does my community care about? Ask three questions C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D
  61. 1 2 What does my community care about? Who are we authentically? Ask three questions C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D
  62. 1 2 3 What does my community care about? Who are we authentically? How can we deliver an extraordinary value proposition? Ask three questions C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D
  63. • Social issues • Other brands • Elements of their lives • Challenges they face • Something else What does my community care about? 1
  64. Who are we authentically? 2 Taylor is nailing it.
  65. How can we deliver an extraordinary value proposition?3 A magic combination: high perceived value, high potential to achieve results.
  66. Red Bull’s consumer- inspired approach
  67. “The idea was always to find a way to have the fans lead the conversation about the brand, and the brand to enable it, rather than the top down approach of the brand publishing a message to reach its fans.” – Tessa Barrera Red Bull Former Global Head of Social Media
  68. Red Bull Stratos • More than 8 MM consecutive live streams (YouTube record) • 7% of entire internet conversation • 2 MM unique consumer engagements • Top 10 Twitter trending topics in 6 countries, 8 global Twitter trending topics • 400% increase over average consumer engagement
  69. “Red Bull does not focus on what they sell, they focus on who they are: a company that brings excitement to its advocates. Isn’t that what an energy drink does? Why not focus on it?” – Tessa Barrera Red Bull Former Global Head of Social Media
  70. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  71. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  72. Ask three questions D A T A - D R I V E N
  73. 1 What is my customer’s lifecycle? Ask three questions D A T A - D R I V E N
  74. 1 2 What is my customer’s lifecycle? What are the appropriate times for content to play a role? Ask three questions D A T A - D R I V E N
  75. 1 2 3 What is my customer’s lifecycle? What are the appropriate times for content to play a role? How can I use the digital and offline body language of my audience to personalize their content experiences? Ask three questions D A T A - D R I V E N
  76. What is my customer’s lifecycle? 1 The right place for content varies significantly by category and brand.
  77. What is my customer’s lifecycle? 1 The right place for content varies significantly by category and brand. “We do not need to be slaves to the data. We should use data to inspire us and our teams. We want to use data as a starting point and a way to validate, but we don’t want to use data to replace decision making.” – Dr. Laura Granka UX Manager Google
  78. What are the appropriate times for content to play a role? 2 Context + Content Intent
  79. What are the appropriate times for content to play a role? 2 Context + Content Intent “It’s about combining compelling stories and predictable output and results. Marketing has increased its contribution to the pipeline by 120%.” – Claudia Hoeffner Sr. Director, Demand Generation & Channel Strategy Acquia
  80. How can I use the digital and offline body language of my audience to personalize their content experiences? 3 of marketers say they take a sophisticated approach to measuring content performance against customer segments. Forrester 12%
  81. MINI USA’s data-driven approach
  82. “We use data and analytics to measure trends and engagement across all of our channels because it keeps us informed as to what works best.” – Lee Nadler Marketing Communications Manager MINI USA
  83. MINI Lost & Found • New items every two months • Partnerships with premium brands • Quality lead capture from unique sources • Data-driven follow-up
  84. “We have a number of programs we use to measure this information and that shapes some of our thinking in terms of where we focus our attention, how we want to target our audience, and what we need to consider when building out a strategy.” – Lee Nadler Marketing Communications Manager MINI USA
  85. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  86. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  87. C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D Ask three questions
  88. 1 Does my brand have permission to play in this conversation? C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D Ask three questions
  89. 1 2 Does my brand have permission to play in this conversation? Will the brand’s presence in a conversation add value or noise? C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D Ask three questions
  90. 1 2 3 Does my brand have permission to play in this conversation? Will the brand’s presence in a conversation add value or noise? Should I start a new conversation, or join an existing one? C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D Ask three questions
  91. Does my brand have permission to play in this conversation?1 Think less about what to post next and more about what to do next that’s worth posting.
  92. Will the brand’s presence in a conversation add value or noise? 2 Real Time Right Time ≠
  93. Will the brand’s presence in a conversation add value or noise? 2 Real Time Right Time ≠
  94. Should I start a new conversation or join an existing one? 3 Be on the way, not in the way.
  95. Should I start a new conversation or join an existing one? 3 Be on the way, not in the way. Royal Bank of Scotland placed mortgage calculator tool directly into a popular site for house hunters. It was the perfect example of a sought-after content utility in a specific context that drove business outcomes. RBS recorded thousands of leads that generated business from the tactic. Forrester
  96. T-Mobile’s conversation -led approach
  97. Because baseball fans in particular love accessing stats, replays and live feeds during games, T-Mobile has worked to deliver the best possible network experience to ballparks across the country. – T-Mobile
  98. Biggest 7th Inning Ever • 231 MM impressions • 40 MM trend impressions on Twitter • 496,000 engagements through influencers
  99. Be on the way, not in the way. “T-Mobile and Major League Baseball chose ‘Take Me Out to the Ball Game’ as the theme of the tribute to the game because it is such a quintessential part of every ballpark experience. [It is] the third most frequently sung song in America behind only ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ and ‘Happy Birthday to You.’” – T-Mobile
  100. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  101. C O N S U M E R - I N S P I R E D D A T A - D R I V E N C O N V E R S A T I O N - L E D
  102. Ready to put your idea to the test?
  103. The 3-2-1 idea test — Ready to put your idea to the test?
  104. 2 1 The 3-2-1 idea test A truly pure idea can generally be expressed in: 3words sentences paragraph
  105. Example: Coca-Cola’s Open Happiness 3 words: Delightfully Surprising Moments 2 sentences: To deliver on Coca-Cola’s promise of happiness, the brand will surprise consumers in delightful ways when they’re least expecting it. A series of stunts, witnessed by few, but then experienced by many online will constitute share-able content that brings the brand’s positioning to life. 1 paragraph: While Coca-Cola is at the center of culturally iconic moments, some functional brand elements can be mundane: vending machines, delivery trucks and bottle disposal. These moments lend themselves to delightful surprises that literally open moments of happiness at the point of interaction with the brand. As these moments are created, they’ll be captured as digital assets and told in compelling, share-able ways that are native to social platforms. By passing them along, consumers will have the opportunity to share their happiness with their friends.
  106. Content Marketing Landscape S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 New Content Creation Models S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Examining Editorial Calendars S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S
  107. Talk to us – Contact Ben Grossman VP, Strategy Director e: ben_grossman@jackmorton.com m: 617.752.1711 t: @BenGrossman Read our blog at blog.jackmorton.com Follow us on Twitter @jackmorton Visit us online at jackmorton.com We’re a global brand experience agency. We generate breakthrough ideas, connecting brands and people through experiences that transform business. Our portfolio of award- winning work spans 75 years across event marketing, sponsorship marketing, promotion and activation, experience strategy, employee engagement, digital, social, and mobile. Ranked at the top of our field, Jack Morton is part of the Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc. (NYSE: IPG). More information is available at: www.jackmorton.com. About Jack –
  108. S U C K

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