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Putting students in the SADL: keynote paper at HEA Changing the Learning Landscape seminar, 7 May 2014

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Putting students in the SADL: keynote paper at HEA Changing the Learning Landscape seminar, 7 May 2014

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Keynote by Jane Secker and Maria Bell, presenting the findings of the LSE Student Ambassadors for Digital Literacy (SADL) project at HEA Changing the Learning Landscape Digital Literacy workshop at LSE, 7 May 2014

Keynote by Jane Secker and Maria Bell, presenting the findings of the LSE Student Ambassadors for Digital Literacy (SADL) project at HEA Changing the Learning Landscape Digital Literacy workshop at LSE, 7 May 2014

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Putting students in the SADL: keynote paper at HEA Changing the Learning Landscape seminar, 7 May 2014

  1. 1. Putting students in the SADL: enhancing digital literacy at LSE Jane Secker Maria Bell @LSESADL
  2. 2. LSE context  LSE : specialist social science institution – world class library  Highly ranked for research  Cosmopolitan students - relatively small undergraduate population  Traditional teaching and assessment
  3. 3. Digital and Information Literacy at LSE …. ANCIL informing practice
  4. 4. The audit Image cc from http://www.flickr.com/photos/notkaiho/5716096442/
  5. 5. Careers Language Centre Teaching & Learning Centre Language Centre LSE100 Departments Library Library Library Library Departments LSE100 Library Centre for Learning Technology Teaching & Learning Centre Departments Language Centre Library Teaching & Learning Centre Departments Language Centre Language Centre Teaching & Learning Centre Careers Departments LSE100 Secker & Coonan (2011)
  6. 6. Developing a framework
  7. 7. Literature review
  8. 8. Embedding in the curriculum
  9. 9. Changing Learning Landscapes
  10. 10. SADL Project Aims  To explore the role of Student Ambassadors for Digital Literacy (SADL)  To explore how aspects of digital and information literacy can be embedded into the curriculum in two academic departments  To develop a set of resources on finding, managing and evaluating information  To share best practice on embedding digital, academic and information literacies into the curriculum
  11. 11. The team Worked with 2 academic departments Social Policy Statistics
  12. 12. Methodology  Pre & post -project questionnaire: research practices  4 meetings / workshops: Student Ambassadors to attend  Blog: team sharing & wider dissemination tool
  13. 13. The ambassadors: recruitment
  14. 14. The ambassadors: rewards
  15. 15. Research practices questionnaire Research: where do you start? How did you learn to use your favourite research tool? What do you think of the Library search tools? Assessing quality: library resources and internet resources? Identify strengths and weaknesses of your research practices Purdy, J. P. (2013) “Scholarliness as Other: How Students Explain Their Research-Writing Behaviors”. In McClure, R. & Purdy, J. P. The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students. Information Today, New Jersey
  16. 16. Research practices questionnaire “I go on to Moodle to find if there are any relevant links that Professors have posted online. If there are recommended articles that are in the library, I will search for it. Otherwise, I will google scholarly articles to see if anything has been written about it.” “Researching my first essays, I used google scholar - it doesn't involve much learning, the simplicity is what makes it a useful first step.” “I think it's comprehensive, but sometimes it's hard to find to narrow it down and to find the most relevant information.” “I scan the title and abstract to assess which are the most relevant.” “I think I am good at research to the extent that I can find lots of resources and get the relevant articles instead of going aimless and overwhelmed by the information. My weakness is that I am still lack of all kinds of tools and knowledge of websites to do a good job on very scholarly research.” “Mostly use one from amongst the top 5 of the Google hits. But mostly on the relevance of the url and the first few lines that can be read on google hits page.”
  17. 17. Workshop overview Workshop 1: Searching for Information What skills are useful to support studies? What is digital literacy ? Understanding project context Finding, using and evaluating information Workshop 2: Academic practices: research and reading for your discipline To evaluate types of information will need to study & why What do you do when approaching assignments? To devise strategies for reading and research - What to read? How much to read?
  18. 18. Workshop overview Workshop 3: Managing and sharing information What is a student ambassador for digital literacy? Managing information – tools that help you. Understanding plagiarism and good academic practice in writing To come: Workshop 4: Digital Footprint Developing and managing web presence
  19. 19. Digital Literacy JISC definition: “By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society: for example, the skills to use digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; as part of personal development planning; and as a way of showcasing achievements.”
  20. 20. How do you approach an assignment? Workshop 2: reading and writing in your discipline?
  21. 21. Workshop 3: Managing and sharing information How do you keep up to date, manage, store and cite your information?
  22. 22. Emerging findings and observations • Challenges any assumptions and generalisations about students as they are all different and have developed different strategies for study  Contrasts between disciplines - Statistics students don’t tend to use Library resources - Social Policy students read extensively  Sharing – cautious about where and how  Enthusiasm for engagement / involvement in a support role is boundless – untapped resource
  23. 23. Lessons learnt  Student Ambassador for Digital Literacy role – clear expectations  Developing relationships with students takes time  Workshops require:  Defined aims and objectives  A lot of preparation time  Appropriate learning space
  24. 24. Lessons learnt cont’d  Platform for students to share ideas?  Expected greater engagement with the blog  Exploring alternatives – Facebook Group, Moodle, Padlet  Increase publicity outside project to academic departments and other students to gain momentum
  25. 25. The future…  Project still ongoing  Greater exploration of Student Ambassador role required  Finding a platform where students happy to share  Is it sustainable and scalable?  Are there staff development needs?  The future……
  26. 26. Further reading and resources Bell, Maria and Moon, Darren and Secker, Jane (2012) Undergraduate support at LSE: the ANCIL report. The London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK. Available at: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/48058/ Karnad, Arun (2013) Embedding digital and information literacy into undergraduate teaching. Centre for Learning Technology (CLT), London, UK. Available at: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/51221/ LSE Digital and Information Literacy Framework (2013) Available at: http://bit.ly/1gq63IO LSE SADL Project website (2014) Available at: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsesadl/
  27. 27. Thank you Find out more at http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsesadl/ SADL Resources http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsesadl/resources/ @LSESADL Jane Secker j.secker@lse.ac.uk @jsecker Maria Bell m.bell@lse.ac.uk @bellmari

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Maria
  • It’s been a long journey – starting back in July 2011 when I returned to LSE fresh from my Arcadia fellowship with Emma. This is me, staring at the road ahead, wondering what obstacles and road blocks might lie ahead of me, what by roads might distract me, and whether I might be given a green light to storm ahead at any point!
  • We carried out an audit of undergraduate provision in terms of the ANCIL 10 strands. Carried out the study using the methodology devised by Katy Wrathall as part of her Arcadia fellowship – this involved interviews, but also questionnaires for staff and for librarians. We focused on Ugs because they don’t attend optional workshops and although there is a core course they all take which covers some digital and information literacy, it’s not discipline specific. We were also aware that fairly low numbers of Ugs take courses that require them to write a dissertation. But the study was also to inform teaching in the Library and Centre for Learning Technology.

    10 recommendations and findings that were endorsed by Teaching, Learning and Assessment Committee in Feb 2013. See the report for details.

  • You can use ANCIL in different ways, and a common way has been to audit or review your provision. We have resources available for those interested in following this methodology. This proved a useful exercise at LSE, it was a way of starting a conversation about information literacy, but it also provided us with evidence that there might be gaps in the current provision, or areas of overlap or duplication – or possible mixed messages. It gave us a clearer picture of how information literacy was dealt with from the student’s perspective.

    Most recently at LSE we are starting to use our framework (based on ANCIL) as a way into talking to academic staff about what they want their students to learn and be able to do at the end of their course. It provides a structure for the teaching we can offer, and what has been important is to develop learning outcomes, but also to include example activities, so that staff can see what each of the strands means.

    Reference to ANCIL report (add to references)
  • We developed the framework based on ANCIL, but also drawing on the Open University and others – but similarly it has learning outcome and sample activities – positive feedback to date.

    8 abilities – 1. understand and engage in scholarly practice
    2. Identify scope and find info and data
    3 Critically evaluation information data and online tools
    4 Manage information and data
    5 Use information and data in an ethical manner
    6 Present and communicate data and info appropriately
    7 Collaborate and share data and information
    8 Apple info and digital literacy practices in new contexts
  • CLT undertake research and so we felt it was important to underpin any developments with a literature review – this was carried out in 2013 on Embedding digital and information literacy into undergraduate teaching. It was an opportunity to look at developments since Emma and I did our ANCIL work, and particularly to draw on the JISC digital literacy projects.

    A dual approach is required, for Information Literacy and Digital Literacy skills to be successfully embedded into undergraduate teaching at the LSE. As explored in the CASCADE programme, student change agents provide contextualised, peer to peer support, but also important feedback on the kinds of issues faced by students and the tools and technologies being used to overcome them and gain IL skills.
    -
    The report recommended both a top down approach (strategy) and a bottom up using students as change agents. There needs to b increasing communication between academic and support staff and librarians to better understnd each other’s role and remit
  • So work has been on-going to embed in the curriculum, which has involved working with academic staff in Sociology and Stats – teaching 3 sessions in ST312 a Stats course.

    But also interest from other departments in taking forward pilots. The framework can really help to underpin what is done. We are also using it to map all our workshops/
  • Last year the CLL workshop on embedding DL in the curriculum was a chance to hear from previous projects that had engaged students in digital literacy – we had already picked up on work of projects such as CASCADE at Exeter in the lit review. A project was reported on were the students’ union had been involved.

    Funding offered to those attending the workshops led to the launch of SADL
  • Ellen

    To explore how aspects of digital and information literacy can be embedded into the curriculum in two academic departments
    To develop a set of resources on finding, managing and evaluating information that can be embedded into courses in Moodle or used in face to face teaching
    To explore the role of Student Ambassadors for Digital Literacy to help ensure the resources are fit for purpose and meet the needs of students
    To share best practice on embedding digital, academic and information literacies into the curriculum with the teaching and learning community at LSE.


  • Collaborative Project:
    Library
    Centre for Learning Technology (CLT)
    Teaching and Learning Centre
    Student Union
    IT Training
  • Ellen

    Be brief

    Pre project questionnaire using Google form on current research practices. Intend to carry out another post-project to measure impact
    Workshops – when signed up students expected to attend all 4
    Blog - dissemination
  • Ellen

    Student recruitment – looking for 10 students from each department
    What we did?
    Created a person spec and students had to apply

    Student Union support
    ‘Shout outs’ in class
    Email / Moodle
    Twitter

    Effective?
    Got 20 students. Range of years

    Incentives
    Statement on Higher Edcuation Achievement Report (HEAR) record

    Amazon vouchers – attendance at workshop and participation in additional activities e.g. Candi, HEA events

    Badges – online badges (Mozilla open badges)

    Wanted to give them real badges but apparently they’re not cool (Maria?)



  • Ellen

    Student recruitment – looking for 10 students from each department
    What we did?
    Created a person spec and students had to apply

    Student Union support
    ‘Shout outs’ in class
    Email / Moodle
    Twitter

    Effective?
    Got 20 students. Range of years

    Incentives
    Statement on Higher Edcuation Achievement Report (HEAR) record

    Amazon vouchers – attendance at workshop and participation in additional activities e.g. Candi, HEA events

    Badges – online badges (Mozilla open badges)

    Wanted to give them real badges but apparently they’re not cool (Maria?)



  • Maria

    What? Purdy Questions used

    Why did we do this?
    To explore scholarly practices or understanding of scholarly practices of our ambassadors before the project started.

    Asked them to identify strengths and weaknesses as a researcher

    Purdy, James P. (2013) “Scholarliness as Other: How Students Explain Their Research-Writing Behaviors”. In McClure, Randall and Purdy, James P. The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students. Information Today, New Jersey
  • Maria

    Examples of responses

    Show evidence of good practice

    Common issues:
    distraction;
    being unfocussed;
    too much;
    unsure about assessing quality of sources but know they should be.

    What will do later? Post project questionnaire will re-examine and assess impact of project
  • Maria
    A flavour of a workshop – why workshops not focus groups - Meetings with students initially envisaged as focus groups

    Then thought that rather than just seek information from students, should also provide development for students – 2 way

    Interactive activities
    Provide input

    Quick win – skill they leave with
    e.g.
    Searching Summon and Google – key word strategies and focussing search results
    Reading strategies – targeting reading and what needed from the reading
    Managing – ref management tools, social bookmarking, online storage



  • Maria
    A flavour of a workshop – why workshops not focus groups - Meetings with students initially envisaged as focus groups

    Then thought that rather than just seek information from students, should also provide development for students – 2 way

    Interactive activities
    Provide input

    Quick win – skill they leave with
    e.g.
    Searching Summon and Google – key word strategies and focussing search results
    Reading strategies – targeting reading and what needed from the reading
    Managing – ref management tools, social bookmarking, online storage



  • Ellen

    In the first workshop we gave the students 3 definitions for Digital Literacy and asked them to choose one.

    “the ‘savvyness’ that allows young people to participate meaningfully and safely as digital technology becomes ever more pervasive in society.” (Future lab)

    “By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society; for example, the skills to use digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking: as per personal development planning: and as a way of showcasing achievements.” (JISC)

    “Digital and information literacies are the skills, knowledge and understanding that underpin our ability to learn, undertake research and to teach in a digital age. It is vital that LSE students and staff develop critical, creative, discerning and safe practises when engaging with information in the academic environment.” (LSE definition)

    They chose the JISC one overwhelmingly
  • Ellen

    Show some of the work done

    How students approach and assignment

    One is stats and one is social Policy

    Shows tools used and the approach

    Also shows how students interweave academic work with their lives – cook and eat, facebook chat, social media

  • Ellen

    Range of different software used – other posters with further tools

    Students shared with us and each other – asked about tolls they didn’t know about and were interested in trying these out.
  • Ellen
    Project not finished – 3 months to go – 1 more workshop

    Challenge any assumptions and generalisations about students as they are all different and have developed different strategies for study

    Students from different disciplines have different academic practices but there is merit in bringing them together
    Statistics students don’t tend to use library resources, but this was a great way of learning about what their needs are around data, stats help etc.

    Hard for students to share things. Hard to bring up – not going to bring up Mendeley in the pub on a Friday night. We are more likely to talk about Mendeley in the pub on a Friday night – Maria

    Librarians find digital tools much more interesting and are likely to share with each other than students do!
    Srudents very enthusiastic – want to share and even lead sessions for fellow students – need help facilitating this. The engagement in the workshops has been very high – the students are motivated and want to particpate. There’s been no drop off in attendance and some students have been involved in other activities – Candi (parternship with 6th form college to give a level students flavour of uni and develop research skillls) – and speaking at and HEA event held at LSE in May.
  • Maria

    Set clear expectations about the role of digital literacy ambassadors
    Are the students an ambassador, a champion, a mentor for others?

    Be prepared for trust to take time to develop – students will open up as they get to know you

    Workshops need a lot of planning and resources to ensure they are engaging and interactive – plan for plenty of activities and opportunities for you to learn from the students!
    Early workshops need to be structured – makes students more comfortable. Can get more flexible as project goes on once they gain confidence and get to know us and each other
    Learned how to teach Ugs, activities – adapted resources made available as OERs from Adam Edwards, Middlesex and Matt Borg, Sheffield Hallam

    - Workshop 2 – fuzzy on our aim meant less satisfactory but good input from students still. Made us think and reflect better for 3 and for rest of project objective.

    and space has an impact on the atmosphere you are creating – if you want informal, then don’t use a board room!

  • Maria

    The platform to allow students to share ideas with each other needs thinking through and it is probably best to ask them at the outset of the project what they want to use!
    We expected greater engagement with the digital space – we used a blog, but on balance we should have asked the students what they wanted (a Facebook Group)

    Ensure you circulate wider publicity, engage academic departments in recruitment but also as the project progresses so that staff and other students know about the work of the ambassadors – students very keen that we disseminate to other students and their teachers.

  • Maria
  • Just show the slide (no time to talk to it)

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