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For better or for worse- Technology's impact on education

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For better or for worse- Technology's impact on education

  1. 1. October 2012
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  4. 4. Ten years ago, Twitter & Facebook didn't exist. Ten years before that, we didn't have the Web. So who knows what jobs will be born a decade from now? Though unemployment is at a 25 year high, work will eventually return. But it won't look the same. No one is going to pay people just for showing up. We will see a more flexible, more freelance, more collaborative and far less secure work world. It will be run by a generation with new values. 4
  5. 5. Youngsters today are completely different than previous generations (physically and neurologically). All of the research shows that the brains of the digital generation are changed physically and chemically; they are wired differently than we are and interact with content differently (hyperlinked mind - Neuroplastic)....constantly creating new thinking patterns vs. being primarily set in stone at early age. Images processed 60,000 x faster than text and they read differently than older generations. As professional educators, we need to determine HOW to work most effectively with this new type of student and how to prepare them for future jobs. We need 21st C skills. (Ian Jukes) 5
  6. 6. The major Dilemma What’s becoming abundantly clear is that digital kids are different than when we were growing up. Not just a little different but FUNDAMENTALLY different. And it’s not our fault. We are not just facing a generation gap but a DIGITAL gap. Technically it is the 21st century, but our schools are not there, and our challenge now is to reinvent schools for the 21st century - for the sake of our children, our students and the welfare of our world. Making such a paradigm shift is not easy. After all, when any of us thinks of education, we usually think of what we knew as school - the way it has always been. That is how parents, teachers, policy makers, politicians and many students think of school. But we have to make the paradigm shift to 21st century education. 6
  7. 7. A brief history 1971 1993 1994 • • 1971 1993 2003 1993 1996 2006 1st email sent 1st web page Geo Cities ICQ Ist Instant Chat 1 million web users Google search engine Friends unite social site LinkedIn Face Book You Tube Twitter 7
  8. 8. FB users in Asia # Continent ↑↓ Users ↑↓ Penetration 1 Asia 270599180 6.99% 2 Europe 248899760 30.64% 3 North America 242168820 45.82% 4 South America 139543400 35.18% 5 Africa 49999200 5.36% 6 Australia and Oceania 14689420 42.38% Currently, according to our world population statistics on Facebook, the continent with the most users is Asia. Conversely, the continent with the lowest number of Facebook active users is Australia and Oceania. Combined, there are currently 965 899 780 Facebook users 8 worldwide. (www.socialbakers.com)
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  11. 11. Positives • Flexibility • Repeatable • Convenient • Accessible • Appeals to different learning styles • Ability to access information and connections • Employability 11
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  13. 13. Challenges • Privacy • Security • Miscommunication • Access to unsuitable material • Time • Technology 13
  14. 14. The Dilemma • Parents, community remember schools 20 years ago • Teachers struggle with today • Students growing up with ICT • Education reformers planning 20 years ahead (about an unknown future) 14
  15. 15. Benefits • Differentiated learning appeals to individuals • A new teaching/learning tool • Interaction beyond the school yard • Educating for the 21st century • Willingness to work cooperatively • Global citizens 15
  16. 16. Harness the power • Investigate locally used devices and access • Integrate into teaching and learning as appropriate • Explicitly teach acceptable protocols • Incorporate culturally appropriate materials • Encourage learners to learn • Encourage peer to peer learning • Connect parents and community 16
  17. 17. Options are endless • Blogging • Micro blogging • Social networking • Screen cast sharing • Collaborative Editing Working etc 17
  18. 18. Delivery Methods • Software • Websites • Apps • DVDs • Devices • Combinations 18
  19. 19. Examples of social sites 19
  20. 20. QSET examples • www.qurbantrust.edu.pk • http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=2KT2ebiisjc&feature=related • https://www.facebook.com/groups/3401 41633024/ • QurbanTrust@QurbanTrust 20
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  22. 22. What is 21st Century Education So what is 21st century education? It is bold. It breaks the mould. It is flexible, creative, challenging, and complex. It addresses a rapidly changing world filled with fantastic new problems as well as exciting new possibilities. 21st Century education addresses the “whole child”, the “whole person”, and does not limit our professional development and curriculum design to workplace readiness. Tony Wagner in his book, The Global Achievement Gap identifies seven 21st century skills. • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving • Collaboration across Networks and Leading by Influence • Agility and Adaptability • Initiative and Entrepreneurialism • Effective Oral and Written Communication • Accessing and Analyzing Information • Curiosity and Imagination 22
  23. 23. 21st Century Schools Schools will go from ‘buildings’ to 'nerve centers', with walls that are porous and transparent, connecting teachers, students and the community to the wealth of knowledge that exists in the world.” Some school buildings will transition into learning centers that are open 24 hours a day, accommodating both child and adult learners, providing support staff to assist people who struggle with the system or on a specific topic. Other school buildings, or portions of buildings, will transition into production centers filled with the tools and equipment for people to produce new courseware. Staff people will also be on hand to assist in courseware design and creation. 23
  24. 24. 21st Century Teacher From primary role as a dispenser of information to orchestrator of learning and helping students turn information into knowledge, and knowledge into wisdom. Teachers will have many good options to consider as the changes begin to happen. Some teachers will remain with the school buildings and work more as guides, coaches, and tutors for students needing help. Others will move into event planners and experience designers as each facility experiments with re-engineering the social side of learning. The 21st century will require knowledge generation, not just information delivery, and schools will need to create a “culture of inquiry”. 24
  25. 25. 21st Century Learner The people who will be quickest to adapt to the new system will be the students. Instead of being forced to learn specific courses that are often of little interest to them, students will be free to select the topics that they are most interested in. In the past a learner was a young person who went to school, spent a specified amount of time in certain courses, received passing grades and graduated. 25
  26. 26. 21st century curriculum? Twenty-first century curriculum has certain critical attributes. It is interdisciplinary, project-based, and research-driven. It is connected to the community – local, state, national and global. Sometimes students are collaborating with people around the world in various projects. The curriculum incorporates higher order thinking skills, multiple intelligences, technology and multimedia, the multiple literacies of the 21st century, and authentic assessments. Service learning is an important component. The curriculum is not textbook-driven or fragmented, but is thematic, project-based and integrated. Skills and content are not taught as an end in themselves, but students learn them through their research and application in their projects. Textbooks, if they have them, are just one of many resources. 26
  27. 27. How should schools prepare students to meet the 21st century challenges? Employers consistently rank collaboration very high on their list of “must have” competencies, which is not surprising given changes in the workplace. This broad competency is best understood as a cluster of related “interpersonal skills” that give one the power to interact effectively with others, including the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing, to relate well to others and cooperate with them, to negotiate and manage conflicts, and to lead through persuasion. When asked about these separate interpersonal skills, employers rate graduates worst in oral and written communications. But classroom teachers should bear the only responsibility: Research shows that athletics and other student activities can help students develop skills related to leadership and teamwork and have a positive impact on later earnings. 27
  28. 28. Jokes Mother to her 6 year old: Honey, how was school? Child: Check FB, I updated my school day an hour ago Pakistan Masi you were absent yesterday without telling me Masi: Baji I left a msg on FB that I won’t b cuming 28
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  30. 30. A Poem For Those Over 30 A computer was something on TV From a science fiction show of note A window was something you hated to clean And ram was the cousin of a goat. Meg was the name of my girlfriend And gig was a job for the nights Now they all mean different things And that really mega bites. An application was for employment A program was a TV show A curser used profanity A keyboard was a piano. Memory was something that you lost with age A CD was a bank account And if you had a 3 inch floppy You hoped nobody found out. 30
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