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Designing for our Future Selves
Julie Kennedy & Lucy Scott
UCD 2015
23 Oct 2015
Julie Kennedy
Head of UX
Lucy Scott
Senior Researcher
Meet us
• Meet our users
• Why design for them
• What’s different
• How to design better
• Looking to the future
What we’ll cover
Here’s what the older user of today looks like
Let’s not forget the millions of other older users
• Limited incomes
• Housebound
• Restricted
mobility
• Limited access t...
• Life expectancy and healthy life expectancy increasing
• By 2025 almost a ¼ of the UK population will be over 65
• Value...
From ONS 2014
So what does their current wealth look like?
• Number of 65 - 74 using tablets to access the internet has trebled
• 40% of Daily Mail newspaper readers have a tablet
•...
“We assume only younger
tech-savvy people will want to use this”
“The problem of older users
will go away in the next 10
y...
This results in a vicious cycle of exclusion
Products
are difficult
for older
users
Older
people try,
have
trouble, feel
a...
“They say adapt or die. At my age, I feel
I can’t adapt, because the new age is not
an age that I grew up to understand.”
...
Vision
Hearing
Physical
speed
Hand movement and
other physical limitations
Memory and
information processing
So what happe...
How do changes affect memory and processing ability?
Memory and
information processing
Declines with age:
• Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex
• Hormones and proteins that repair
brain cells
• Blood flow to the...
Changes in memory make noticeable changes in behaviour
Older users are often:
• Slower and more methodical
• More likely t...
Vision
How do changes affect sight and vision?
Changes in vision accelerate with age
What happens:
• More difficult to see objects clearly
• Over 85, one in 20 are legal...
Changeable font sizes are critical for ease of use
Which of these colours are typically more difficult for older users to
accurately distinguish?
Colour blindness increases ...
Physical
speed
So what happens as we age?
Difficulty clicking buttons on insurance site
Slow clicks  timed out
Older users often take longer to do things:
• Timeou...
Research: new touch screen UI
• Huge gesture-based age divide
- Younger users: no problem
- Older users: nearly impossible...
Hand movement and
other physical limitations
So what happens as we age?
• Arthritis is a common disability in the 55+ age group
• Joints: causes painful degeneration
• Mobility: severely restric...
A lot of people in the tech industry talk about
“changing the world” and “making people’s lives better.”
Making it better
...
• The reasons:
- Increasing older population
- Available cash
- Loyal once hooked
• Expose product teams to older users
• ...
Running usability research with our older users
Preparation
• Give clear up front information
• Replicate home environment...
Keep the following in the back of your mind
The Basics
• Clear paragraphs, headings, links
• Maintain consistency througho...
Technology can help older users stay independent longer
Technology is helping people who aren’t able to do what they used ...
Technology can help augment lost senses
Technology to be the eyes and ears by helping older people who lose hearing or sig...
Technology can help elderly users to remain ‘medically safe’
Medical alarms
“Your mother hasn’t moved
for a while...”
Medi...
Technology can help make sure you‘re never ‘lost’
GPS Shoes embedded with GPS trackers help find a person with Alzheimer's...
Technology can reduce social isolation: CNA speaking exchange
Technology can be a force for change in the
way we treat older people.
Thank you
Questions?
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UCD15 Talk - Julie Kennedy & Lucy Scott - Designing for Our Future Selves

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How do we design for the older generation? This group is often ignored in the development of new products, despite many over 55s having ample money and time to invest in the latest technologies

Learn what you need to consider in your research and design process to create usable products for older users. We will look at some of the cognitive and physical changes associated with aging and consider how these impact on use of products and technologies.

Technology can also be a huge enabler for older users – we will also look at some products in market or development which are helping elders stay independent and healthy for longer.

We’ll demonstrate all this with some real life examples from user research and end on a great video.

Veröffentlicht in: Design
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UCD15 Talk - Julie Kennedy & Lucy Scott - Designing for Our Future Selves

  1. 1. Designing for our Future Selves Julie Kennedy & Lucy Scott UCD 2015 23 Oct 2015
  2. 2. Julie Kennedy Head of UX Lucy Scott Senior Researcher Meet us
  3. 3. • Meet our users • Why design for them • What’s different • How to design better • Looking to the future What we’ll cover
  4. 4. Here’s what the older user of today looks like
  5. 5. Let’s not forget the millions of other older users • Limited incomes • Housebound • Restricted mobility • Limited access to technology
  6. 6. • Life expectancy and healthy life expectancy increasing • By 2025 almost a ¼ of the UK population will be over 65 • Value of grey £ Spending power of over 65’s (2010) = £76 billion By 2030 this will grow to £127 billion = growth of 68% “There was no respect for youth when I was young, and now that I’m old, There is no respect for age – I missed it coming and going” J.B. Priestley The ‘older population’ is something we’ll ALL be part of
  7. 7. From ONS 2014 So what does their current wealth look like?
  8. 8. • Number of 65 - 74 using tablets to access the internet has trebled • 40% of Daily Mail newspaper readers have a tablet • Increase in age 65 - 74 going online in any location up 70% from 2005 • 20% of 65 - 74 use a smartphone compared to 12% in 2012 • Half of 55 - 64 have a social media profile • Key area’s of interest are travel, news, watching TV playing games and health Some facts about the older user and technology?
  9. 9. “We assume only younger tech-savvy people will want to use this” “The problem of older users will go away in the next 10 years...”We don’t have the time, money, or expertise to set up and maintain a website that is tailored to the needs of older people “We don’t know any older users who’d want to participate in our studies” “We don’t want to see anybody over 65 in this sample” How often have you heard the following?
  10. 10. This results in a vicious cycle of exclusion Products are difficult for older users Older people try, have trouble, feel alienated Bad experiences promote avoidance Older users not perceive as the ‘target market’ Products not built with older users in mind
  11. 11. “They say adapt or die. At my age, I feel I can’t adapt, because the new age is not an age that I grew up to understand.” Anne - 89 Why design for this group? A worst case scenario…
  12. 12. Vision Hearing Physical speed Hand movement and other physical limitations Memory and information processing So what happens as we age?
  13. 13. How do changes affect memory and processing ability? Memory and information processing
  14. 14. Declines with age: • Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex • Hormones and proteins that repair brain cells • Blood flow to the brain • Neurotransmitters vital to learning and memory • Efficiency of absorbing brain-enhancing nutrients Memories are harder to make and recall as we age Add brain image Hippocampus Prefrontal cortex
  15. 15. Changes in memory make noticeable changes in behaviour Older users are often: • Slower and more methodical • More likely to read all information • Susceptible to issues of cognitive load • Need more help learning new skills • Reluctant to try new things • More likely to use search engines to save time • Twice as likely to give up on a task • Assign blame to themselves
  16. 16. Vision How do changes affect sight and vision?
  17. 17. Changes in vision accelerate with age What happens: • More difficult to see objects clearly • Over 85, one in 20 are legally blind • Presbyopia - long-sightedness caused by lens hardening • Pupil shrinkage - require more light • Loss of peripheral vision - decreased by 25% by 80 years • Contrast sensitivity diminishes from 40 years - Reduced by 83% by 80 years • Half of all over 65 years have cataracts How macular degeneration effects vision over time
  18. 18. Changeable font sizes are critical for ease of use
  19. 19. Which of these colours are typically more difficult for older users to accurately distinguish? Colour blindness increases with age
  20. 20. Physical speed So what happens as we age?
  21. 21. Difficulty clicking buttons on insurance site Slow clicks  timed out Older users often take longer to do things: • Timeouts • Session lengths • Other time-based assumptions Older users do things more slowly and deliberately
  22. 22. Research: new touch screen UI • Huge gesture-based age divide - Younger users: no problem - Older users: nearly impossible • Physical movement changes with age “It’s like a doorbell, you assume you have to press it long and hard to get someone to hear you” Older and younger people gesture differently...
  23. 23. Hand movement and other physical limitations So what happens as we age?
  24. 24. • Arthritis is a common disability in the 55+ age group • Joints: causes painful degeneration • Mobility: severely restricted • Dexterity: limiting, operating controls and switches, gripping objects such as door knobs and using tools • Small objects: poor ability to handle very small objects eg. mouse, phones, hearing aids • Slower task times Elderly users often experience difficulties with their hands Arthritis
  25. 25. A lot of people in the tech industry talk about “changing the world” and “making people’s lives better.” Making it better We can do this …. Follow some simple principles, to create products that work better for everyone, especially those who need and enjoy them most.
  26. 26. • The reasons: - Increasing older population - Available cash - Loyal once hooked • Expose product teams to older users • Understand needs of older user groups - how they differ from younger • Include a +70 sample in your research • Older and younger friendship pairs Start with product strategy
  27. 27. Running usability research with our older users Preparation • Give clear up front information • Replicate home environment • Provide pen and paper to make notes • Make participants feel comfortable In session • Stress that you are not testing them • Keep them focussed • Avoid technical jargon • Allow for extra time and for them to think
  28. 28. Keep the following in the back of your mind The Basics • Clear paragraphs, headings, links • Maintain consistency throughout • Provide feedback on clicked links • Design for colour blindness • Make obvious – click, tap • Provide explicit instructions • Show trusted • Stay in one window
  29. 29. Technology can help older users stay independent longer Technology is helping people who aren’t able to do what they used to with things like shopping, driving and communications.
  30. 30. Technology can help augment lost senses Technology to be the eyes and ears by helping older people who lose hearing or sight continue to enjoy doing things they used to Audiobook libraries accessible anywherePulse vibrating wristband, Lechal shoe for navigation The Google Lens (illness treating) Empatica seizure predicting wristband Bluetooth hearing aids and in- ear sound systems
  31. 31. Technology can help elderly users to remain ‘medically safe’ Medical alarms “Your mother hasn’t moved for a while...” Medication monitoring Home care monitoring systems Medminder Pill Dispenser, and Protius Biotech’s smart tablets Phillips Lifeline CanaryCare sensor system ‘The 2010s will be known as the era of digital medical devices’
  32. 32. Technology can help make sure you‘re never ‘lost’ GPS Shoes embedded with GPS trackers help find a person with Alzheimer's or Dementia
  33. 33. Technology can reduce social isolation: CNA speaking exchange
  34. 34. Technology can be a force for change in the way we treat older people. Thank you Questions?

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