Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

Fundraising_Fundamentals

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Running	Head:	FUNDRAISING	FUNDAMENTALS	 20	
	
Fundraising Fundamentals
Fundraising can seem like a drain when compared to ...
FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS
©	Therese	F.	Martin	2016	
2
9. Build understanding of basic technology tools and develop a draft ...
FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS
©	Therese	F.	Martin	2016	
3
Distill those needs into one or two over-arching themes.
Now, write a...
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 20 Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Anzeige

Ähnlich wie Fundraising_Fundamentals (20)

Fundraising_Fundamentals

  1. 1. Running Head: FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS 20 Fundraising Fundamentals Fundraising can seem like a drain when compared to the fun and rewards of running programs. Still, it is a component of running a successful organization. Learn about developing a major gifts campaign and balancing that with annual gifts campaigns, special events, and grant applications Lecturer: Dr. Therese F. Martin, tmartin@tmartinconsults.com Agenda Introductions (10-10:30a) Exercise – Your existing fundraising plans (10a-11a) Lecture – The fundraising cycle (11a-12p) Lunch (12p-1p) Grant proposals (1-1:30) Individual and Major Gifts (1:30-1:50) Social Media (2p-2:50p) Special Events (3-4) Outcomes AAACC Incubator Outcomes 2015-2016 1. Expand professional capacity for leadership by understanding one’s growth areas and relevant strategies for personal and organizational resiliency. 2. Garner the skills and confidence to prototype a program that is response/reflective of the complex context of their organization 3. Grow individual knowledge of tools useful in producing productive and satisfying work cultures 4. Boost capacity for collaboration with partners, peers, and community members prioritizing mindful listening and priority setting across complex situations 5. Develop a strong grasp of the fundamentals of design thinking and understanding of certain techniques can be used to develop a new program or refine an existing one 6. Understand techniques for raising earned and contributed income and which mix of sources best fit their particular organizational values, goals, and environment 7. Acquire confidence with the language and format of non-profit budgeting and finance 8. Improve the ability to tell the organization’s unique story to multiple audiences
  2. 2. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 2 9. Build understanding of basic technology tools and develop a draft of a technology plan suitable to organization’s budget, ambition and capacity Course Outcomes 1. Garner the skills and confidence to prototype a fundraising program that is response/reflective of the complex context of their organization 2. Understand techniques for raising earned and contributed income and which mix of sources best fit their particular organizational values, goals, and environment 3. Acquire the language and format of non-profit budgeting for grant proposal writing 4. Improve the ability to tell the organization's unique story to multiple audiences Introductions Write your introduction. Who are you and why are you qualified to lead your department/organization? Public share: your introduction Write how you would introduce your organization. This introduction is not your mission. It is how you describe your organization in conversation. Your organization exists because there is a need that no other organization or government agency is addressing. What are those needs?
  3. 3. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 3 Distill those needs into one or two over-arching themes. Now, write a one-sentence description of the need and how your organization solves it, e.g. Because area artists are not equally represented in exhibitions and as a political voice, ArtSpan puts on SF Open Studios and lobbies for artists’ concerns. Mention the need first. Name your organization. Keep your sentence to 30 words or less. (Feel free to write, scratch, and rewrite.) What you have written is your statement of purpose. Share your statement of purpose with your neighbor. Make note of their suggestions. If you like them, then incorporate them.
  4. 4. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 4 Public share: Present your statement of purpose while you are standing on one leg. We are confirming that your statement of purpose is a good “elevator pitch.” Your Existing Fundraising Plan Which are parts of your fundraising plan? ☐ Proposal writing ☐ Annual giving campaigns ☐ Membership campaigns ☐ Special events ☐ Major gift solicitation ☐ Matching gift campaigns ☐ Direct mailings ☐ Email blasts ☐ Social media campaigns ☐ Other How often do you conduct each one: annually, biannually, twice per month, monthly, every other month, weekly, other, as needed? ____________ Proposal writing ____________ Annual giving campaigns ____________ Membership campaigns ____________ Special events ____________ Major gift solicitation ____________ Matching gift campaigns ____________ Direct mailings ____________ Email blasts ____________ Social media campaigns ____________ Other
  5. 5. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 5 If the circle represents a year, mark when you campaign for gifts and memberships and hold special events. Mark if your campaigns are via mail, e-mail, or through social media. Is it balanced and cyclical? Are you campaigning for money, at least, every other month? Share your drawing with your neighbor. Explain your campaigns and events? Ideally, you want to fundraise constantly and not overburden your staff. A four-person staff with Host Committee teams of seven can handle two special events and two hard mail
  6. 6. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 6 membership/giving drives. Conduct your drives one or two months after your special event but not three months prior to a special event. Grant Proposals Audience You need to consider who will read your proposal and make recommendations. Panels and program directors interpret your proposals in different ways. Panels. Government agencies use panels with open hearings. Panelists take home binders of applications and make preliminary scores. Often, the agency designates one or two panelists to present their understanding of the organization and its request. Some agencies allow the organization to respond to questions while others do not. You might call an agency if you did not receive a grant and ask what you can do better. Program Director. Program directors work at foundations. The program director makes a recommendation to the executive director as to whom to fund. The executive director presents this to a board of directors/trustees. Program directors might visit your organization and interview the executive director. It is a good idea to have your program director attend this meeting. The Missions vs. the Statement of Purpose It’s probable that you and your board crafted the mission statement during a retreat and spent a lot of time on it. The statement of purpose should be how you introduce your organization or program. Write a statement of purpose for each of your programs.
  7. 7. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 7 Explaining the Program and Outreach Impact model. The impact model gives you a way to visualize your program. (Bradach, Tierney, & Stone, 2009) Theory of change. List what you do to in brief bullet points.
  8. 8. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 8 Direct impact. When you perform these actions what do they create as a collective? Who do you serve? Unmarked box. The premise of this model is that you want what you are doing to spread. You want to help more people than are in your current constituency. How are you sharing what you do? Indirect impact. On a broader scale, how does your sharing create local or global change? Evaluation. Grantors want to know what tool you are using to measure organizational health and program outcomes. Your audit, financial review, tax return, and Cultural Data Report are parts of the organizational health. Grantors also want to see a board with fixed terms of service, regular rotation, and professional diversity. For example, an arts organization that serves visual artists should not have a board of only those constituents. The board should have at least one attorney and CPA (or other finance professional, CFA, CFM, CFP). The board would be stronger still if there were a member that is a public relations (or marketing) professional and someone who works in customer relations/sales/customer database management. You want to demonstrate that there are no declines in constituents or donors/members. If there is a 2% decline, explain it in the footnotes.
  9. 9. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 9 The logic model. The logic model is a common way to analyze a program. (Note that you can go to the link, which I provided, and download the template.) As with many processes, you need to start with the end in mind. In this case, you need to decide if you are using surveys, interviews, focus groups, or government statistics as your measurement instruments. I strongly advise organizations to hire a consultant to draft surveys and questionnaires. It lends credibility to your evaluation. I see many nonprofit questionnaires that will lead to useless information. The question is set up incorrectly. The consultant does not have to analyze the results of a survey unless you want to make a case for legislative change. You can compare year-to-year trends. You should always have an outsider conduct interviews and focus groups. Include evaluation expenses in all of your grant proposals and budgets. If you don't secure the donation/grant, you won't have the expense. However, you won't be able to cover the expense if you do not ask for the money. (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wiki_exampled_Logic_Model.png) Long-term outcomes. First, know who your constituents are. Are they artists, children, both? Are your members constituents? How will the conditions of your constituents change?
  10. 10. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 10 Intermediate outcomes. What social behaviors will change? Short-term outcomes. What will people learn? Board Giving If your board does not give, you won’t receive many grants. Grantors want to see that board members believe so much in the organization, that they will invest in it. When I submit grant proposals, I submit pages of footnotes to the financial statements. Where it reads, “individual giving,” I write, “5 board members gave $__ / __% of individual gifts.” Where it reads, “special event income,” I write “12 board members bought $__ in tickets and sold __ number of tickets.” Where it reads, “in-kind income,” I write, “7 board members secured 20 gifts, totaling $__.” If your institution has art auctions, where it reads, “art sales,” I write “6 board members donated and raised $__.” What can you add to your footnotes about your board giving? Individual gifts Buy tickets Sell tickets Secure in-kind donations Gave art or experience (private music recital)
  11. 11. Running Head: FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS 20 There Is No Such Thing As Overhead Everyone in your office is working on programs or fundraising. Allocate rent, utilities, payroll expenses, etc. to programs and fundraising. We’ll cover this when we go into budgeting. Turn the Award into a Challenge Your organization always needs money. After receiving a grant award, you should send a simple, but direct email and social media blast. “We need to raise $___ by __/__/20__ to match a recently received grant.” Keep the amount modest – something that allows for a win. If your operating budget is $250k and you just received a $10k grant, ask for $3k. You'll need a way to receive the donations. Paypal and Mollyguard are great. Individual and Major Gifts Donor Bill of Rights
  12. 12. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 12 Major Gifts Major gift solicitation is a peer-to-peer activity. In essence, you want to look at the list of prospects and see if they know your board members or other individuals that are close to the organization. Those individuals need to be willing to help you make “the ask.” It's simpler to take someone out for coffee three times and then ask for a gift on the fourth visit than it is to write a grant proposal or host a special event. Each time you take that person out tell him or her about a recent program development. The first thing you need to do is know that the person attends your fundraisers and gives to your organization. Then look at how many times that person has attended events and donated. Have they answered the call 75% of the time? You could test the waters by hosting a house party. This party is a type of special event, but the guests are exclusive to potential major donors. Invite no more than 20 people. Couples count as two people. The party takes place at a board member’s house. Keep the guest list small. This is not a large-production event. Only the hosting board member, board president/chair, and board members who have a connection to a potential donor should come. The executive director and development director should attend. Everyone who attends needs to be “selling.” Do not “close” any donations. If people express an interest in donating, make an appointment to see that person at his/her office. In some way, display your art with a slide show or video. Board members cover the food and beverage costs and or catering. Keep it simple. Do not waste your in-kind solicitations on a house party. You could have coffee and cookies on a Sunday. Host a Saturday afternoon buffet of cold cuts and cheese with wine. Make a list of potential prospects. You are always asking for a bigger gift. Do your board members or other donors know that person? If so, list the prospect and the corresponding board member (or donor).
  13. 13. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 13 Activity. Asking for major gifts. We’re going to write two scripts: one for a donor who responds to a story and one who responds to numbers. Then we will work in teams of three to ask each other for money.
  14. 14. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 14 Individual Giving You’ll use your statement of purpose as the tagline of your individual giving appeal. Put it on the envelope and in the body of your text. A well thought through individual giving campaign that uses envelopes should cost you no more than $0.50 to raise $1. You won’t receive gifts unless you ask for them. When you ask for them, you need a way to receive them. You need an online tool for Internet depositing. It’s become trendy to ask for $15 per month gifts. Doing so gives you a steady income stream. Make sure to leave room for matching gift information. Run your campaign two months after a special event but not two months before an event. Generate donation acknowledgments within one week. If you receive 50 or fewer donations per campaign, write a special note from the program director or executive director on every acknowledgment. I also make phone calls or have my board members to individuals who give to three campaigns in a row. If all you can do is leave a phone message and instruct him/her/them to call you back if he/she/they have questions or would like to have coffee, you have strengthened your bond with that donor. You need a way to accept gifts of stock. Talk to your bank about a mutual fund. Explain you’re a nonprofit. Find out the minimum amount of money that you need to maintain the account and transfer that amount to the mutual fund. While you are talking to the bank, you should ask for the name of the foundation and corporate sponsor contacts. You want the name of a person, not just a Website. Social Media Announcements You need to use a combination of email, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Use a service such as Constant Contact for your emails. It is worthwhile to have a professional email marketer work with you and create the template of your blast. You don't want the design to change with every blast. It confuses your brand. Email blast monthly and link people to content on your site. Do not put all of the content in the email. At the very least, link to your mission statement and your donation page. Do not forget to include your statement of purpose. Facebook and Twitter are platforms for fun, e.g. pictures from programs and events, links to articles that are relevant to your organization, photos with staff and major donors or corporate sponsors. Also, use Facebook and Instagram to call people's attention to legislation and relevant rallies. Finally, use Facebook to point to your content on LinkedIn. Use LinkedIn to create content. Write three-paragraph summaries and lessons learned from your programs. This sharing demonstrates transparency and is the action you take to fulfill your indirect outcome. Crowdfunding
  15. 15. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 15 Right now, I'm not a fan of crowdfunding. The expenses are steep, and the results can be mixed. If your announcement system and PayPay and Mollyguard are reliable, then crowdfunding is a waste of money. You can compare fees by looking up the "Top 10 Fundraising Sites" at www.crowdfunding.com. If you are monitoring who raised what, such as a marathon, then the crowdfunding method works well. In these instances, a person is using an online customer management system and scripts that you generate to create personalized messages for individual people. Setting this up can cost $10k or more. Special Events Special events are fun. However, they do not generate a lot of money when you compare the time that goes into producing them. You could spend upwards of $0.75 to raise $1. Think of special events as awareness generators and prospecting tools. Set the income of special events with low expectations. You need at least six months to plan a proper special event. Remember even if you are collecting tickets at the door and no money trades hands, you still need a liquor license. Theme Your event and the activities within it should be mission-based. For example, you should not host a cocktail party or dinner without exhibiting your program. If you serve children, invite them to perform. Performing arts organizations should not auction visual art. It detracts from your mission and confuses your brand. If you are a performing arts group and cannot accommodate live performances, have video or a slide show running. The Committees You need some people with connections to help you sell tickets and oversee logistics. The committees are the Honorary Host Committee and the Host Committee. You will name the Host Committee with the name of your event, e.g. The Art Launch Committee. Honorary Host. You may have an Honorary Host Committee or an Honorary Host. Either the Board President/Chair is in charge of this committee. Comb your list of existing and prospective major donors for names. Also, ask any high-profile person. Make it clear how many tickets you would like that person to buy and sell and have that person sign a memorandum of agreement. Do not make this request over email. Call that person. Always, contact the Mayor's Office and your district representative if he or she would like to join. Even if the government official cannot buy or sell tickets, give that person four. List your board president/chair as a member of the Honorary Host Committee. If the Mayor or the representative attends the event, invite him or her to speak. Sometimes, they will send an aid. That’s fine. Have that person speak.
  16. 16. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 16 Host. The host committee does the heavy lifting. They work with staff to deliver to the timeline that staff sets and secure in-kind donations and corporate sponsorships. This committee will meet at least monthly. The chair of the Host Committee speaks at the event. Volunteers Use the minimum number of volunteers possible. Volunteer management takes time and energy. Volunteers eat and drink. The staff person who is managing volunteers should only deal with three, four, or five people. If you need more people than that, then designate volunteer captains. Make sure that you train the volunteers, at least, two days before the event and on the site. The executive director, development director, and chief program director should not do the work of volunteers. They need to talk to guests. Corporate Sponsorship Corporate sponsorship is the bread and butter of an event. You need to start working on corporate sponsorship, at least, one year before the event. Corporate sponsorship is not a donation. Do not ask a corporation’s foundation to sponsor your event. You need to talk to someone in marketing. Corporate sponsors want “eyeballs.” You need statistics that indicate who attended your past events and any information that indicates that these people are potential customers for the corporate sponsor. You need to survey your audience. Treat in-kind donors as in-kind sponsors. Give them the same respect and placement in your materials as you would a cash sponsor. Regarding placement, you need to establish the cost of being a title sponsor, presenting sponsor, and tiers of sponsors. The tiers depend on the "value of your eyeballs." At a variety of donor levels, you need to decide on logo placement or name placement and the costs to place items in gift bags, have a table at your event, and include a coupon or announcement in your collateral. At each level of sponsorship, give away a certain number of tickets. Have title and presenting sponsors speak at your event. Never send a menu of sponsor levels to a prospect. Do your homework. See if your board members have a connection to anyone within the company or small business. Call for an appointment and then email the potential sponsor with a prospectus. That prospectus should name only one level of giving and list the corresponding benefits. You can always invite the sponsor to look at a higher or lower level of sponsorship. Never “give away” the levels. If you don’t have someone giving at the $250 level, do not “bump up” the $200 sponsor. The chair or president of the Board of Director/Trustees will act as Master of Ceremonies. If he or she does not want to be the MC, then the duty falls to another board member. The speaker order is the title sponsor, presenting sponsor, government official(s), Host Committee Chair, the executive director. These speakers do not need to speak one after the other. Give your audience a break. The government official may need to leave. Be prepared for that person to speak at an unpredicted time.
  17. 17. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 17 Schedule This is an ideal schedule. One year before the event set the time and location of the event and choose the Host Committee Chair. Remember that depending on what type of organization you are, you might want to avoid certain dates. For example, visual arts organizations want to avoid first Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Diligently, call other organizations and work to avoid conflicts. Once you establish this, start working on corporate and in-kind sponsors. You want the sponsors to cover the costs of the event so that the tickets are pure profit. Nine months before the event, identify the full Host Committee members, have your first Host Committee Meeting, and then meet monthly. Have those individuals continue to work on sponsorship. Six months before the event, identify a graphic designer. At five months, turn on your online ticket sales and send a “Save the Date” message. Depending upon how fancy your event is, you may want to use mail rather than only using a digital message. Make sure the Honorary Host and Host committees have what they need to sell tickets. Do not commit to any volunteers. Two months before the event, mail the invitation. Since you are using postal mail and you can reach many people through the Internet, you might want to limit your mailing list. Two months before the event, have the Host Committee begin to meet twice per month. If you are using Volunteer Captains, identify those now. One month before the event, speak with the Host Committee and Volunteer Captains. You need to vet and invite 100% of the volunteers that you would need. You need to have a reason to invite a volunteer and explain the event time and mandatory meeting date. These individuals should have a strong link to your organization and be un-inebriated at the time of the event. I like to invite those who benefit from the organization and people who donate consistently at a low level. Reward those who give you $20 per year. They are invested in you but can’t afford a $40 ticket. One month before the event, assemble a list of past event attendees and donors. Assign board members to call particular people on the list. If the board member has a special connection to someone on the list, make sure the board member has that person on his/her call sheet. Board members can be shy. Reassure them that they are not selling tickets. They are leaving messages, thanking people for past support, and reminding these individuals that the event will take place soon. I spoke to a board member who was rather introverted but later told me that she loved making the calls and connecting with people who were enthusiastic about her organization. She made certain to find them during the event. While none of them became major gift prospects, they continue to be supporters and look for her at events. Three weeks before the event remind your volunteers to come to the mandatory training. If people cancel, return to your vetted list and invite more volunteers. Two weeks before the event, train the volunteers. You or the Captains should remind the volunteers of
  18. 18. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 18 the statement of purpose. Then, walk volunteers through the entire space, including safety exits. Every volunteer should understand what is happening at each station, the order of speakers, liquor laws, and his/her station and duties. Have each volunteer sign a Memorandum of Agreement to volunteer, hold the organization harmless, and remain sober. The timing for setting up, hosting, and breaking down the event will vary. Without exception, volunteers should arrive one hour before the event. Because the volunteers and staff remain sober, I like to have an after party at a late-night restaurant or bar. To me, this is an event expense. I buy one drink per volunteer and some appetizers. Many times a volunteer will insist on throwing some money into the pot. Count that as a donation. Be sure to invite the Board of Directors. They probably won’t come. After all of the time that goes into breaking down an event, they are probably asleep. Conclusion Envision fundraising as a cycle. Now, use the circle to plan when your annual gift/membership drives, special events, and major gift research will take place.
  19. 19. FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS © Therese F. Martin 2016 19 A solid fundraising program requires planning. Establishing a cycle takes trial and error. Look at the fundraising cycle and determine what responsibilities can the staff complete or oversee. Remember that, at small organization, the executive director and development director need to focus on major gift solicitation and grant proposals. With this in mind, mark the fundraising cycle with any known grant application deadlines. Public share: Your final fundraising cycle.
  20. 20. Running Head: FUNDRAISING FUNDAMENTALS 20 Recommended Reading Bradach, J., Tierney, T.,Cacija, & Stone, N. (2010). Delivering on the promise of nonprofits.The Jossey Bass Nonprofit Reader, pp. 222- . 238. San Francisco: Josey Bass. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=NAD8IXtTWrgC&oi=fnd&pg=PA2 22&dq=delivering+on+the+promise+of+nonprofits&ots=Q0RRf94HFf&sig=Ma0UI woqSRUPzsdmcDJA4aTDB- E#v=onepage&q=delivering%20on%20the%20promise%20of%20nonprofits&f=fals e L. N. (2013). FUNDRAISING IN THE CONTEXT OF NONPROFIT STRATEGIC MARKETING: TOWARD A CONCEPTUAL MODEL. Management : Journal of Contemporary Management Issues, 18(1), 59-78. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.webinfo.ndnu.edu:8080/docview/1418199977?accountid= 25323 Staecker, D., & Reid, J. (1994, Jan). Understanding the fundraising process: 8 steps every nonprofit leader must know. Nonprofit World, 12, 8. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.webinfo.ndnu.edu:8080/docview/221332643?accountid=2 5323 Brooks, A. C. (2004). Evaluating the effectiveness of nonprofit fundraising. Policy Studies Journal, 32(3), 363-374. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.webinfo.ndnu.edu:8080/docview/210559886?accountid=2 5323 Waters, R. D. (2008). Applying relationship management theory to the fundraising process for individual donors. Journal of Communication Management, 12(1), 73-87. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/13632540810854244

×