Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 24 Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Ähnlich wie Assertiveness (20)

Anzeige

Aktuellste (20)

Assertiveness

  1. 1. Different styles of Communication and Presenting By : Sandeep Gupta HR & Compliance M/s Telegence Powercomm Pvt.Ltd.
  2. 2. Passive Communication • Allowing our own rights to be violated by failing to express our honest feelings, ideas or preferences. • The goal of being a passive communicator is to avoid conflict no matter what and please people at all costs • Very safe-Little risk is involved • Little eye contact, timid body language • May suddenly explode after being passive after long
  3. 3. Examples of passive communication • “I don’t know.” • “Whatever you think.” • “Maybe” • “I will go with whatever the group decides.” • “Yes, yes” • “I am okay with anything” • “It doesn’t matter to me”
  4. 4. What can happen if we are passive most often?? If we don’t know how to be assertive we might experience: • Depression. From anger turned inward, a sense of being helpless, hopeless, with no control over your life. • Resentment. Anger at others for manipulating or taking advantage of you. • Frustration. How could I be so spineless? Why did I let someone victimize me?
  5. 5. Where does passive behavior come from? • Many of us are taught that we should please and/or defer to others, or that we shouldn’t “make waves”, • That if someone says or does something that we don’t like, we should just be quiet and try to stay away from that person in the future.
  6. 6. Aggressive Communication • Protecting ones own rights at the expense of others rights • The goal is to win at all costs; to be always right • The cost is often damaged relationships but they would not care less! • Intimidating and angry eye contact, lots of energy, loud and belittling tone of voice, can also be violent and abusive at times • Extremely controlling
  7. 7. Examples of aggressive communication • “I don’t know why you cant see that this is the right way to do it.” • “It is going to be my way or not at all!” • “You are just stupid if you think that will work!” • “Who cares about what you feel. We are talking about making things work here.”
  8. 8. Passive-aggressive behavior • The goal of this style is to appear to avoid conflict and also make others think they seen things your way. • Behaves passively to peoples face, then aggressively when they are not around. • Often use sarcasm • This behavior breaks trust and confuses people around
  9. 9. Example of passive-aggressive behavior • “I hear what you’re saying, and wouldn’t want to make waves, so I will do what you say even though someone will probably get sued.” • “Your ideas are good. People cant even make out they are stolen from somewhere!!”
  10. 10. THE MOST EFFECTIVE STYLE OF COMMUNICATING IS….ASSERTIVE STYLE.
  11. 11. What is Assertiveness? It is the ability to honestly express your opinions, feelings, attitudes, and rights, with confidence, in a way that doesn’t infringe on the rights of others. Assertiveness style is the healthiest since boundaries of all parties is respected
  12. 12. Assertiveness:  Is not aggressiveness, it’s a balance between respecting your own rights and also rights of others.  Assertiveness focuses on problem solving and is the most reasonable and objective approach  It’s dependent on a feeling of self-efficacy, a sense that if you behave in a certain way, something predictable will occur.  It focuses on bringing about win-win results  An assertive person has… Confident body language, good eye contact and effective listening skills.
  13. 13. Statements used: • “I think…I feel…I believe that…” • “I would appreciate it if you…” • “So what you are saying is…”
  14. 14. Selective Assertiveness • It’s a lot easier being assertive with a stranger than with someone important who might get angry. • The more important the relationship, the more important it is to be assertive. • Assertive behaviors lead to increased respect from others.
  15. 15. Three parts of assertive communication: • Empathy/validation: Try to say something that shows your understanding of the other person’s feelings. This shows them that you are not trying to pick a fight. • From the example: “ I know this will be a change for you…”
  16. 16. Part 2: Statement of problem • This piece describes your difficulty /dissatisfaction, tells why you need something to change. • From the example: “Next time I feel frustrated, I’m going to ask that we stop and consider all the ideas.”
  17. 17. Part 3: Statement of what you want • This is a specific request for a specific change in the other person’s behavior. • From the example: “I know this is a change for you but I know I’ll feel better about myself if I can tell you my ideas.”
  18. 18. How to be effectively assertive: • Use assertive body language. Face the other person, be sure you have a pleasant but serious facial expression, keep your voice calm and soft. • Use “I” statements. Keep the focus on the problem you are having, not on accusing or blaming the other person. Example: : I’d like to be able to speak without interruption.” instead of “You’re always interrupting me!”
  19. 19. How to be effectively assertive: • Use facts, not judgments. • Example: “Did you know that shirt has some spots?” instead of “You’re not going out like that, are you?” • Express ownership of your thoughts. • Example: “I get angry when you break your promises.” instead of “You make me angry!”
  20. 20. How to be effectively assertive: • Make clear direct requests. Don’t invite the person to say no. • Example: “Will you please…” instead of “Why don’t you…”
  21. 21. Special techniques for difficult situations: • Broken record: Keep repeating your point, using a low level, pleasant voice. Don’t get pulled into arguing or trying to explain yourself. • Fogging: This is a way to deflect negative, manipulative criticism. You agree with some of the fact, but retain the right to choose your behavior.
  22. 22. Special techniques for difficult situations: • Content to Process Shift: This means you stop talking about the problem and you bring up, instead, how the other person is behaving RIGHT NOW. Use it when someone is not listening or trying to use humor to avoid the issue. • Example: “You’re getting off the point and I am starting to feel frustrated because I feel you are not listening.”
  23. 23. Special techniques for difficult situations: • Defusing: Letting someone cool down before discussing an issue. • Example: “I can see that you are upset, and I can even understand part of your reaction. Let’s talk about this later.” • Summarization: This helps to make sure you’re understanding the other person. • Example: “So what you’re trying to tell me is….” • Specificity: It’s really important to be clear about what you want done. Example: “The thing I really wish is that you’d pick your clothes up off the floor.”
  24. 24. Is assertiveness the best way to go? • Before you act assertively, you have to decide if you can live with the consequences. • Although assertive behavior usually will result in a positive response, some people might react negatively to it.

×