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Native Americans

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A very boring, but concise intro to the Indigenous of America.

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Native Americans

  1. 1. 5 TE IND GENOUS : T THE STORY OF THE REAL AMQRI CANS J’ -, , . - ~/5'aI5‘~ . .. L"? ??/ {:. . 4 , ';. «.v”’ / 5- 4‘ . ‘ '1'! 11:» ', -"—“-‘F J 4'". [T o'. «‘ -‘ if’ T 1b! I.’. T/t: , «‘ J — I3‘) " ' V ’ . ’ If’ , . I V. *. _ E! ‘ f - . 5 O‘ T" T’ A um ‘R '1 4! Iluu 9-ed
  2. 2. THEORIGITNEOF NATIVETHLATMERr: cANsull: It all sta rted with humans: migratingulfwaif‘ “ H E America from~, Eurasiai; oVer ’: y"eairs5a— " ago This migration was made possible by a land bridge named Beringia that use to connect America to Eurasia across what is now the aBejring Strait. It is; believed these T o J prehistori. c;pe_uopu| {esneventuallypopulated the AAmeri; tcas, an“d forn1e‘cl_thuin, d;reds ofdistinct _tIfibes‘fea_chf§h, a(i%n“g; tih‘eirown -I un_iq’u e i'tr3difiouns and . ;|anguages‘, >w'ho went on to fform: nthéiB. |f>e‘at Native; American i[Naitiuon.
  3. 3. _u . .~ 4 . . . - / . . 2 . . , _ < . . . . X. _. . _ — . _ cl / ’ . r . . . _ . _. , . . . 9” pl. , . f s . u k . l . . u in p y , I . . . rp[. I.I . .l. l . -o v I _/ r, . .1 , . 5 . . _ I l , r . _. P 2 . fl . /L . . k. ... .:. M .2.. . : ., . III. .. Al. J : . .1 r . _. . (I ». ll , . . . . /4. v
  4. 4. POPULATIO. Nv-ANDTTHHEWAYIOF’LIFE? !3. E The NativeAmer'icans. Tcomplrisedlsoirriabo. ut‘~ ii2}to_’a2:O is million people, ‘and since there‘ afrevno pr_e’+Colurnbianw 1! texts available, th"eLnumbe'r will forever rernainv‘ uncertain. The Indigenous, however, were undoubtedly vast in number and spread across the whole of America, more so in the southern parts. The terrain and lay of the land would dictate how tfheyiliived, theirculture and ways of y yprocurisng’ foodies well as. ;the"ir industry. Native A, Americans living byithe’; isea“fish'ed, ..tthose’who lived in . the %pra'isries. :hulI‘l”[ted . buffalo; 'and almost-all Native Americansltivatecl; :Tlfieyf, we‘re, s in fact, ‘quite a vcdmplexagiidaiverse: Pas-mire! community. u
  5. 5. , i 1; ' _ '4 " . . L ‘_ . J . , ' ' _r} -19;, ‘ ' 4 A ' (5 ‘ . . _ '
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  7. 7. RELIGION : ’ I A The Native Americanswerefduite’ ildVance’d trade that existed between the diftere, nt. t_ribes. HovveveTr, '=’~ithe_ir . ' I7 society was one of true _socialism . .:-they recogni'ze’cl no true ‘ ownership of land. ‘ The land was the_property of THE GREAT SPIRIT, the supreme being who provided you with life with the condition that you respect this gift and also the life granted to others, .'The religion was based purely on spirituality and oneness. with the "natural world, but often , cjoisncided with th¢'; '§'I_mp| e. oflife : harvesting and hunting. Bitualistic: dances aroundithe_; fi_re; ’and ssimuplistic pictographs with Traditional pract_i'c"e’s__yof jsome‘trib; es _include the use of sacred herbs ' such, a, s__tosba. ~c'co, sweetgrassfior sage. :Eas'ting, ’singing and prayer in , thefancientlanguages of tl1eir"peQP|1e, ,‘ and sometimes drumming are 1a| so‘comm9h; ‘-
  8. 8. . —wv————_—'y—v-—- your veins returns to the sea, and the earth in your bones returns to the ground, perhaps then you will remember that this land does not belong to you, it is you Who belon to this Ian . When the blood in D 9 —. 1. i ‘V. i i
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  11. 11. A ARTAND cuLTl; J.Rl5:l»'t The Art of the Native Americans is‘vibrant'and‘nature- T’ centric, celebrating earth and her bounties. All forms of Native American art are | oad, energetic and unafraid to be colorful. Paintings depiicting scfe'nesof‘ hunting, farming and A A f. ida’ncing, j gaily‘colored; cll_ay. potsu_and vases, hemp . knitted, ve_sts? ~and feavthier/ bead made adornments fused ’with. hidésl_a. nd”furs a're. _a! |;thiat'Native American A; -:. :s~a. b:: w_. y : ~
  12. 12. Freedom and Strength Adaptability Energy Emancipation tr supremacy Harmony Intelligence Power of Love of God away Peace Transformation Unity in Diversity Universe
  13. 13. Each tribe, had it's owfnx. sfpe_cialtyfwheriiit cairnletdsi ~ A A r the arts. TheIroquois; ¥Iivingarofund}the'G'réa’(: ~3; T Lakes and extending eastrand‘no: rth, ~usedlstrings or. “ if belts called wampum that se‘r"ved a‘dualfunction’: the knots and beaded designs mnemonically chronicled tribal stories and legends. Pueblo peoples craftedimpressive items associated with their religiousfcerernohies. l('achin'a dancers wore telabsoratelyl p'ai: nted; 'anduclecoiratedmasks as they r A j. ritual| y_ irjn_pe'rso’nate“di vafriousaanscestral spirits. 7 Navajospirituality; fo_cusedon; the maintenance of a harmonio_us iarelationship with the spiritworldg, Oftenachieved by cererfinnial zacts, usually vi. hc°. rp9ra. tihg: iiand. "paihti. hg. e., , T. i
  14. 14. THE TR. |BE5;. ‘§QClETYfAiuD': P’QL| TlC5€: iIh¢L! shthecbncént: . of ownership, did'not'eXis; t iln? iP. re‘—COl, iL. 'lhbi‘aln. l?5Natjve; ; r American Society, it was not class f| e'. ss‘. Th: e‘l. |e’ad7ership” of the tribe wouldbe handed~ridowi1¥the. maIe. i|ine; offa, A certain family and while spiritual leaders could be both male and female, there tooexisted the preference of family history. Thepchief of someaimalgamated tribes came closest; to our definition. ofV'King’, ‘and as all societies, the family. would enjoy privileges. is 'Warssfre'q§, ue'nt| y broke §U'i;5étNeen the vast number of tribes. ..Welli', knowni. aifI9flé these tribes are the Apache, - the Cherokee, the . Shawnee, .'lth, e_ Cheyenne, the Chockiéwfthé, ;S‘iox, ,». thefCrow anasgont.
  15. 15. — — —'— » Tara “"““ lHH»iwii j; §§T’l0»M __ Knolulag ‘fin. ' '_ mm x - 3;‘ or A r‘: -I~a1.lr-J7 ‘ - mum . /Olnlllll [H 3/>4-lane / loam‘ u : "B, UCkfiOf M 0-I'M" M Dunn Hagan 5,“ - T_'‘‘ ’ ‘- Mm , ' Manda» P ’ ‘““"""'. ‘I I g, .-‘, ,,, Suntan U °"" Ilbdfaol f 1,}, -,{, ,,, ,, I flnflusad _ V 1.. ... . '*’/ P Crom la-. ._, ,, _ paw ‘warns , , W, rm-. ... / "“ -. ”""‘P"I-0 Xrnhrvuiu‘ ‘I, -‘HP’ "W W i lilomlkiw fin I V "3 Xalj ' _ I .9’ 4.». .. mfalure I 8/: one C56 enne . . arm. (do: -.! u‘n (i4u'l'ufa Om Fnmn ‘ slam“ . _ Arm “"“" onee ionlannon “fly” 8; M 0 6 fltupoha ‘ 1 ‘~—. _ » _- m, ' Xnaralm u ~ I”M8¢: rrann if X“’~¥m'. Ml am” I'ual)In A 3'”, _ H p, » ~ . , . . nfa_ Klnua udr o‘f"P"’” _ ‘SM’ . : «mm NM/ lpalzhe W" I s£“""' l ' M 5., ""“"'“'9 Ilompa [_1_, ,,, ,,g, , / l ' - Um "‘<-'sr-= }, =.z-nu. ‘:. :» . "’fi? £.. ..2 4/-cdvefln-ml» M” M. .. '4"'‘'**fj /7 mum : N ‘*‘'''° W, , . "#1 xx‘. . _ Blnliama ‘ Xxqul Opara v, fiqm Llano c, .,, ,A, m, I ‘<7 Hpac/ we ’°""'""‘ WW . limit. A‘ _ nab. ” ““ “MA” rm. ;.. ... .. LAWN. " ii. 8 , ,fl-? r_‘)"cmu: }K§ m Mnllru. _ 5 LM M . >:xiPUf1‘llhbfl gi 3!-rwoc f 4’ ' R = I/ I
  16. 16. Cut an enemy". Hiuiev Weuu throat and counted coup counted coup tool: hr. scalp four time: five tum‘.
  17. 17. .. .. i. 5;‘. 0. ~‘ 6.. .. l. -,a. ‘.'. ..
  18. 18. ARRIVAL OF! T.H. /E COLONIALISTS N.
  19. 19. I Europeans’ had sta. rtedi: to1»’arlflVeiiin Amefrieaiieseejrlye*s. the early 16th century: The firstiié, arrivefwere:59é’rlla'rds. ,lNol doubt the term "lndian". originated. with *Christopher‘7 Columbus. He thought thathe hadireached the East Indies when he landed in America and therefore named the inhabitants Indians. European settllersitoi-America also brought with them i 7 rdiseasesttoi which. the Native_Americans had no resistance. A ‘These diseaiseskilledfmilvlions‘ofzlyndians and resulted in a. I A huge populatibngdecline. Thisalsol weakened the Natives’ ' A capab_i_| ity: tol. defen_d lthemserlvjessfrom the onslaught of the EUrOb, éan$. =i= .r 3 . ‘ r I A E‘
  20. 20. ilflv. /. a. . Nlvlii,
  21. 21. The Eur°Pea. "$«‘l"? ialIv search ofgold: and other valuables; .:They.7stayed‘and_n. formed m‘i| itary_’forts in thesoutskirtsofwhati$; .now, : C. Mexico, inorder to protectitheiriclailmsifrom‘ pirates. Gradually, they started settling in the land of plenty for it's obvious benefits. What startedsout aslarpbuspiness venture for the _ Europeans became ‘outright oppression of the ‘rindigenouss'ofthisNleyy; LWo. r|d. _.Ta king advantage of ithelwealkenedi state of the ilati’v§es the-‘Spaniards szldst‘noftime71in, ‘subjuigatilngzthemassesto slavery. All A ntlie name? of Christia n’ity. ,of course. ..
  22. 22. _ . ex _ . A _ - : rrr» '. ',__r_, , . r.. qr-- ’ ~ _ l. J J. 4 _ V ' .1’. _, ‘__. v_. _. foo-4“‘. '1s; :I, "‘_‘: f." '. ‘_'_‘. ’_y. 1 ». '$7¢-5'. ,.g- 1 y : _ . ' I . . g . _; ‘ i. x. .—. r,, , , L . .,. e ‘ ‘. - . ‘ ' ‘ I V .
  23. 23. ‘. Tl-iE iNATlvEs; vs‘; . TH Emits _R. l:f" Thenfcame. -they Brititsh ea rou n‘d A e is j 16505. Guisingunder: th'e, nameof v " oppressive Puritanical beliefs, the British colonials strivedto rid the land of the Spaniards and lay. claim to the land. '. l,‘ hfs; e}’»l3'ri‘_tish 7 policy; however, of civilizinrgjth’efii-_Natives-Wasno less painful. . Th§'e, :Brit_i, shieijnyissionary policy was to try ' dyad n'dfconvince. th; ep -Natives to jointhem.
  24. 24. Happy Thanksgiving. .. or as the Pilgrims called it happy"ocCupy somebody else's country. " your"CatidS% H < 1 .1
  25. 25. ONLY % mo A DEAD % % -Gén, ¢ PhiIIVip %“ %%shefidan; Wj4{
  26. 26. American Indians and ‘European settlers{‘. befo’re‘A. ,tIjer { American dRevoIutionary. war‘, ¥1and arterathe _ I I Revolution betwe’en. the: Native Americans and the U. S. government. These conflicts have been named the American Indian Wars. rlnL1890the1|astmajo_r battlenbietween Native I , American . |n_diians_~. a§ndfdiU. S.g soldiers occurred. It was ’ I ‘called «thefsattle ojf Wounded-; Knee and occurred near the. Wounded. Knee. Creek‘ in South Dakota. ~Apiprox‘irnat‘ely three hundredsioux Indians were . .s| aL§i3hie. rediv
  27. 27. r_, _. «. ~ _ . ‘. . _‘A_. _ ‘ _ r ~ ¢ _‘ . , ' '. . ‘ , ., W '1, ‘ , . , ._ _ d » . . . I . a . 7 , —v I’ I . .1 I . A r ' 4. W I c- . ‘J I
  28. 28. THE TRAILOF‘l*I'EAR; s;. :a. ,d? In 1838 oneof, theirnosthorrilolier I Americanhistory occuirredf I As part of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, the Cherokee nationwas forced to give up its lands east of the Mississippi River/ and to migrate to an areavin pre‘sent_-”d; afy. .Oklahoma. This march, named the" "Trail of Tears’; ‘5re'suIl_ted1 inthe death of "rdthousands o= ffflN'ati‘v°e Americans from numerous tribes inclulditng the; Che_rokee, %ASeminole, Choctaw, , and'Chicl<asaw; Mostiofdlthe, deaths were the result. ’ Soft dis_e'ase_, land. ‘exposure-; to theextrerwnely cold
  29. 29. Some of the Iands’: these”tribe‘siwere_giyen; ;tofinhabiri following the arernovals IeveintiuaI_ly! beea_rne; }|_ndian* A Reservationsai I r V A I I 8 In 1851, the United States Congr. e‘ss. passedT, the. Indian, Appropriations Act which authorized the creation of Indian reservations in modern-dayoklahoma. Relationsibetween settlers and natives had grown increasingly worse as thedsettleirs ‘encroached on territory. iand, i:na; tur, al, resourcesiin the West. In 1868, A. President UlyfssesiGraht, ,p, ursued a "Peace Policy" as P I I an atternptito avoidyvigolenceg; The policy included a_ g reorganilzetion of5tihe. Indian Service, ,with the goal of I 're. io¢atingiva rioujs tribes lfrojmitheir aricestral homes to v ipaggrgelszof: |andsgestab_lishedlspecifically for their A piinihjabitagtiolnj
  30. 30. ,4-4' . _ . .‘. _'r .4. v'» FORCED AssIMiLAfioNr d'll In the following years, the " f . ~ ; ' ‘education’ of the defeated i Native Amerins was in fact synonymous with the total eradicationnof their former. selves, their dcuIture, their a hflitaesand evénfheir . L; _ktie| Isi°"- 1his. waéinerhaBs¢v. en. worse than as the Pr°u<iNa’tives , d find forced to-be poor A A of their white
  31. 31. The piolicvficalled afétjthe7replacem‘eht; ‘5fA. 'éo¥¢rfifi1ent officialsfbylreligious men, fno‘n1in; at‘ed "by, .cnur¢h¢s, ,.; toi oversee the Indian agencies. on’ reservaftionsiniiorderite teach Christianity to the native tribes. Thelquakers were especially active inithis policy on reservations. [ The policy was controversial from the start. Reservations. were genera| ly_esta, b|ished by executive order. In n1any’? 'cases, lwhitesetjtlers objected to the size of land -par”cP_el's, whichiwere subsequentlyreduced. A rjep‘ort, .submitted"to Congress in 1868 found A 4 vvide‘sprea‘d. corruptionarnong thefederal Native. 'ifArneri¢'3i3Il1i yagencies; a.nicl_‘ generally ‘poor conditions A A 8 I i , a; m‘ong_t'he‘i relocated
  32. 32. American Indian Reservations ». Federal American 1 Indian Reservations , State American Indian Reservations
  33. 33. RECONNECTINGITQiTlijl'E? PASTf: : The mistreatment and‘, degra, dationivof T Americans wenton for alojng tirne. It was not until, I. the 19505 and then on did the generalliconditiontof their people improve . They began to take more pride in their roots and denyiall the marks left by a white-dominated society. This is what is termed among thenfifasi-a_Great Awakening. I a peoplfefthey are ins'ip_ir_i'ng, ;.and their resilience is plegendary. 'iH; opeful| y‘riewergenerations will ’c'ontinue_“‘ reaching‘ ojtitritoithieyilr» heritage and Ireconnect; ,wit'hIIIthe, ifr pastcmoimpletely. T.
  34. 34. I“ in J- / tn. tun. i. I.t. I . II I . A N in iixn. i~. [mi . ..l II. /urflv v. « ate ,3.. .»

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