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Knowledge Management in Enterprise 2.0 - Part 4

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Knowledge Management in Enterprise 2.0 - Part 4

  1. 1. Knowledge Management in Enterprise 2.0 Part 4 The Enterprise 2.0 Error
  2. 2. This was 5 years ago. 2009
  3. 3. How far have we come in company-internal use? 2014
  4. 4. half full
  5. 5. McKinsey 2012: The social economy: Unlocking value and productivity through social technologies 70% of companies use social software. see benefit in its use. 90%
  6. 6. Social business projects are often strategically planned and enjoy significant management attention.
  7. 7. http://www.realstorygroup.com/vendormap/ Technologies are becoming more mature and more specialised.
  8. 8. half empty
  9. 9. http://www.zdnet.com/salesforce-ceo-admits-social-enterprise-pitch-didnt-work-7000023336/ Hollow phrases like social enterprise or cultural change continue to confuse users and decision-makers.
  10. 10. Many projects in pilot phases fail to meet expectations due to limited participation.
  11. 11. Experton Group: The market for "Social Business for Collaboration & Communication" (SB4CC) in Germany Middle managers and managers of SMEs are frequently unconvinced.
  12. 12. What's the problem?
  13. 13. Use Cases
  14. 14. A use case is the answer to the question:
  15. 15. In the beginning, use cases were barely of interest. “…the technologists of Enterprise 2.0 are trying hard not to impose on users any preconceived notions about how work should proceed or how output should be categorized or structured.” Andrew McAfee: “Enterprise 2.0: The Dawn of Emergent Collaboration” 2006
  16. 16. Originally, the idea was that applications would arise spontaneously during use. Emergence (from the Latin emergere for "to surface", "to emerge" or "to arise") is the spontaneous formation of new properties or structures in a system resulting from the interaction of its elements. www.wikipedia.de
  17. 17. But what do you tell your users? We're using Enterprise 2.0 Social media Facebook Social networking in the company now
  18. 18. What good is that to me?
  19. 19. A good use case gives answers.
  20. 20. What are the major internal use cases? ?
  21. 21. The 4 main higher-level use cases, to be precise. ? ? ??
  22. 22. Information & Official Communication or the use case Modern Intranet 1 Information & Official Communication
  23. 23. What is it used for? − Publishing official, but also localised information for large target groups − Enabling feedback (e.g. comments) − Supporting local editors: relevance and topicality are more important than a perfect layout Information & Official Communication
  24. 24. What's the benefit? Examples − More up-to-date and more authentic information − Accelerates onboarding of new staff − Ability to address individual target groups (e.g. managers) more precisely − Find official information more quickly across the company Information & Official Communication
  25. 25. Combination of information and interaction on a modern intranet Information & Official Communication
  26. 26. Particular strength: High potential benefit and the benefit is very well plannable Information & Official Communication Plannability How well can the benefit of this use case be planned? Benefit How great is the potential benefit contribution to the company?
  27. 27. Projects & Processes or the use case Collaboration Projects & Processes 2 Information & Official Communication
  28. 28. What is it used for? − Collaborating efficiently on projects − Jointly creating and discussing content − Handling unstructured processes in a lean and flexible way Projects & Processes
  29. 29. What's the benefit? Examples − Find relevant content more quickly − Versioning: easier to find current documents − Ability to comment and work on documents simultaneously − Accelerates project onboarding Projects & Processes
  30. 30. Wide range of required complexity of contents and structures. Projects & Processes
  31. 31. Particular strength: Well plannable and a major lever for day-to-day efficiency of all knowledge workers Projects & Processes Plannability How well can the benefit of this use case be planned? Benefit How great is the potential benefit contribution to the company?
  32. 32. Use case Personal Information Management Personal Information Management Projects & Processes 3 Information & Official Communication
  33. 33. What is it used for? Personal Information Management Many things that were already possible: − Work organisation: tasks, appointments, "My Documents" − Finding contacts and experts via contact data or organisational units − Interacting with individuals or in small groups across various channels (e-mail, IM, telephone, ...) New: − Finding contacts and experts outside one's own network via skills and interesting content − Easy mobile access
  34. 34. What's the benefit? Examples − Efficient organisation of own work − Expands site- and organisation-centric employee networks − Reduces search times and helps solve problems more quickly − Allows employees to work at full capacity even when travelling Personal Information Management
  35. 35. Finding contacts: from profiles to content- based expert searches Personal Information Management 1 2 3
  36. 36. Good and bad: Profiles are often badly maintained – making links to content all the more important Personal Information Management Plannability How well can the benefit of this use case be planned? Benefit How great is the potential benefit contribution to the company?
  37. 37. Use case Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & Processes 4 Information & Official Communication Internal Communities
  38. 38. What are they used for? − Exchange groups – independent of organisational structures − Many possible uses such as ideas management, "ask the organisation" or expert communities − Participation is based mainly on intrinsic motivation − Engagement in communities is rarely included in job descriptions or target agreements Internal Communities
  39. 39. What's the benefit? Examples − Find and foster good ideas more quickly − Involve and motivate staff − Make knowledge visible and share it outside structures Internal Communities
  40. 40. Example Ask the organisation Internal Communities
  41. 41. Excessive expectations: Informality causes problems for communities, especially in the long term Internal Communities Plannability How well can the benefit of this use case be planned? Benefit How great is the potential benefit contribution to the company?
  42. 42. Internal Communities Personal Information Management Benefit Plannability Projects & Processes Benefit Plannability Information & Official Communication Benefit Plannability Plannability: How well can the benefit of this use case be planned? Benefit: How great is the potential benefit contribution to the company? Benefit Plannability
  43. 43. So what exactly is the problem?
  44. 44. Not one, but 3 problems.
  45. 45. Excessive expectations regarding the benefit of informal community activities 1
  46. 46. Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication Formal: part of organisation and target management Informal: "emergent" structures
  47. 47. Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication Staff turn the majority of their attention to formal structures. The lever for noticeable benefit is therefore much bigger there!
  48. 48. What about business-critical communities?
  49. 49. Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication There should be no such thing as a business-critical community because ... ... in that case it's not a community any more; it should be part of the structured area, e.g. as a project team.
  50. 50. Non-technical barriers to collaboration 2
  51. 51. Four barriers to collaboration “Willingness” Search barrier − Company size − Physical distance − Information overload − Closed networks Transfer barrier − Implicit knowledge − Shared understanding and language − Weak ties “Ability” Not-invented-here barriere − Insular culture − Status-oriented thinking − Tunnel vision − Fear Hoarding barrier − Competition − Strong individual incentives − Too busy − Fear of losing power
  52. 52. Social business platforms can help overcome the search and the transfer barrier! Search barrier − Company size − Physical distance − Information overload − Closed networks Transfer barrier − Implicit knowledge − Shared understanding and language − Weak ties Ability
  53. 53. But technology isn't much help when it comes to the motivation-related aspects of collaboration.
  54. 54. Status-oriented thinking and bunker mentality can't be resolved with virtual communities. Not-invented-here barriere − Insular culture − Status-oriented thinking − Tunnel vision − Fear Hoarding barrier − Competition − Strong individual incentives − Too busy − Fear of losing power Willingness
  55. 55. The informal use cases are barely viable on their own. 3
  56. 56. Users need good reasons to check in regularly.
  57. 57. The informal use cases can't provide those.
  58. 58. So what is the Enterprise 2.0 error?
  59. 59. With its tools and ideas, the Internet has given us a gift that… Comments Multi- media Profiles Tasks Wikis Activity streams Forums Surveys Ratings Mobile apps Blogs Micro- blogs Team documents Search and filters DashboardsVirtual areas Videos Virtual meetings Networks
  60. 60. …opens up new possibilities for sharing information, knowledge and opinions…
  61. 61. …be it with 5…
  62. 62. …or with 50,000 colleagues.
  63. 63. The Enterprise 2.0 error is to channel the potential of this gift…
  64. 64. …mainly into the informal use cases. Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication
  65. 65. "SOCIAL" may have practically created one new use case… Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication
  66. 66. …but what's much more important is that it has significantly enhanced these three use cases! Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication
  67. 67. The strong use cases draw users to a platform… Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication A
  68. 68. … if this platform then cleverly integrates informal use cases… Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication B
  69. 69. …communities also have a better chance of attracting participation in the long term. Internal Communities Personal Information Management Projects & ProcessesInformation & Official Communication C
  70. 70. The informal use cases for social software are highly overrated and are not sustainable on their own. Use cases with far greater potential, such as communication and collaboration, are still being neglected or taken out of scope. Together they are stronger: Only in combination can informal use cases work in the long term. 1 2 3
  71. 71. T-Systems Multimedia Solutions http://www.t-systems-mms.com Frank Wolf f.wolf@t-systems.com www.besser20.de www.xing.com/profile/Frank_Wolf3
  72. 72. Achim Brück, Ulrich Deiters, Claudia Eichler-Liebenow, Erik Frömder, Simone Happ, Ulf-Jost Kossol, Sven Lindenhahn, Kay-Uwe Michel, Ute Schäfer, Katharina Simon, Katrin Vagt, Denis Wagner Design: Jana Frommhold

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