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Iowa #SBG conference 2015

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Iowa #SBG conference 2015

  1. 1. Standards-based Grading Conference 2015 The World Language Classroom Kimberly Huegerich South Hamilton CSD
  2. 2. Why SBG? Throw out the text Illogical sequencing Elementary skills list Performance-based What does this mean?
  3. 3. Homework: Don’t grade practice! “Mastery requires focused practice over days or weeks. After only four practice sessions students reach a halfway point to mastery. It takes more than 24 more practice sessions before students reach 80 percent mastery. And this practice must occur over a span of days or weeks, and cannot be rushed.” (Anderson, 1995; Newell & Rosenbloom, 1981)
  4. 4. “Homework assignments provide the time and experience students need to develop study habits that support learning. They experience the results of their effort as well as the ability to cope with mistakes and difficulty (Bempechat, 2004).”
  5. 5. Feedback – essential to proficiency “Provide timely feedback. Student learning improves with timely feedback. It's best to provide constructive feedback within hours or a day after students complete an assignment.” Marzano, 2014
  6. 6. Oral Assessments - immediate 1:1 Conferencing Oral assessments – immediate feedback aligned to standards – Sentence structure – Pronunciation – Vocabulary – Retell of a story
  7. 7. Written assessments – within 24 hrs Slight delay – specific written and/or verbal feedback aligned to standards –Sentence structure –Pronunciation –Vocabulary –Retell or new creation of a story
  8. 8. Type of feedback  Successes  Improvements
  9. 9. Standards • CULTURE: Everyday life • FLUENCY: Vocabulary • INPUT: Reading Listening • OUTPUT: Writing Speaking 
  10. 10. WRITING Sentence structure Vocabulary usage Consistent conjugation Express ideas & concepts on variety of topics Retell a story in own words Present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience Effectively and properly use a dictionary SPEAKING Pronunciation Sentence structure – logical sequential Vocab usage – negotiate meaning Consistent conjugation Use circumlocution while speaking to tell about an event Retell a story in own words Present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience
  11. 11. 4-pt grading scale – less is more 4+ = 100% A 4 = 95% A exceeds target 3 = 90 % A- meets target 2 = 75% C approaches target 1 = 50% F below target 0 = 0% F far below target or no adequate data
  12. 12. I can do it on my own. I’m ready for the next level! Stay close by just in case. I’m getting close to being independent Accommodations please… I need more help! 0 1 3 4 2 Grading Scale
  13. 13. Contact information kimhuegerich@gmail.com @donakimberly senora625 http://theactivelearner.blogspot.com Kimberly Huegerich

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Hi I’m Kim Huegerich and I teach MS/HS Spanish and have been using standards-based grading for over the past 15 years. This video will introduce how standards-based grading works in my world language classroom.
  • My journey into standards-based grading began when I was frustrated with the textbook as it wasn’t a logical sequence. I wanted to throw out the textbook and create a performance-based report similar to what our elementary school was doing. I wanted the gradebook to document what the student can do with the language not create a repository of points that didn’t convey any meaning of skill proficiency.
  • Homework:
    Research by Anderson, and Newell & Rosenbloom found that
    “Mastery requires focused practice over days or weeks. After only four practice sessions students reach a halfway point to mastery. It takes more than 24 more practice sessions before students reach 80 percent mastery. And this practice must occur over a span of days or weeks, and cannot be rushed.”
  • Homework is practice. It takes hours of practice to move along the proficiency spectrum called interlanguage. The more graded practice, the less likely students will take risks in the classroom and with their language learning.
  • Bempechat found that
    “Homework assignments provide the time and experience students need to develop study habits that support learning. They experience the results of their effort as well as the ability to cope with mistakes and difficulty (Bempechat, 2004).”
    If we want them to practice, we have to provide the opportunities for them to practice, including modeling the language. ACTFL suggests 90% or more in the target language
    It is not logical to grade practice attempts if we are looking for what they can do in the end. This will take away any risk-taking in the language. They need the freedom to try something new without the grade attached to each attempt. Assess only when they are ready.
     
  • Feedback is essential to working toward proficiency in any standard
    In a recent blog post, Marzano suggested, “Provide timely feedback. Student learning improves with timely feedback. It's best to provide constructive feedback within hours or a day after students complete an assignment.”
    The more immediate the feedback, the more effective it is to pushing students to proficiency. I like to sandwich the criticism between positive things they are doing.
     
  • Oral assessments provide immediate feedback aligned to standards
    Sentence structure
    Pronunciation
    Vocabulary
    Retell of a story
    Students in my classroom do one-on-one testing to show or demonstrate what they know and can do. I provide them specific, immediate feedback based on the standards they are working towards.
     
  • Written assessments usually take a little longer to provide and receive feedback, but usually within 24 hours students have the feedback they need.
     
  • The feedback provided should not be generic, such as good job or well done or even A, but specific to types of errors – don’t forget yo verbs end in –o. This will tell the student specifically what they can do to improve or focus their attention to a specific skill or standard.
  • Standards
    My standards are based on the skill sets necessary to become proficient in a language: culture, fluency, input and output. Everything we do in class is based on progressing the student deeper into these proficiencies.
  • Culture as you know, is what happens all around us. This standard is based on the practices, procedures, and products of the target culture.
  • Fluency is where we build vocabulary via comprehensible input and output. The vocabulary chosen is not based on a textbook, but rather frequency lists – what words are most frequently used in the language.
  • Input is centered around what the student is able to understand through reading and listening, usually via comprehension checks. As with all skill-building, this is done first very structurally with familiar texts, and then later as more impromptu conversation and quick reads.
  • Output is how well the student is able to produce the language through speaking and writing. This begins at the lower levels first with how well they can communicate their message – how much language they can produce – and later it is centered around mechanics of the language.
  • Grading scale It is said, “less is more”. In a recent blog post, a teacher took a group of language arts, gave them essays to grade based on a 100-point scale (percentages), a 10-point scale, and a 4-point scale. The most consistent grading happened in a 4-point scale. The most variance happened in a 100-point scale.
    After playing with this a couple of years ago, I compared grades students were earning on a 100-point A-F system to those of the A/C/F system shown here. There was no significant difference.
  • Stop light
    The 0-4 scale has prompted lots of discussion with students and now they are accustomed to the process. This traffic light sums up how students see the 4-point system. Ideally all students are at the 3-4 level, ready to go to the next challenge. Students at a level 2 are succeeding, but only at a basic level of understanding. Students at a 0-1 either have made no attempt or need significant intervention to help them succeed.
  • For more information or to further this discussion, please contact me using one of these methods.

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