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Presentation for CAUDIT's 2012 learning spaces tour

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Presentation for CAUDIT's 2012 learning spaces tour

  1. 1. Linking Pedagogy, Technology and Spaces: Changing the way learning happens Professor Shirley Alexander Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Teaching, Learning and Equity) University of Technology, Sydney @SAlexander_UTS
  2. 2. • The need to work on learning spaces • Planning – Involving students • Designing – Model – UTS model, technologies, spaces • Implementing • Evaluating • Issues
  3. 3. CITY CAMPUS MASTERPLAN
  4. 4. DR CHAU CHAK WING BUILDING EAST ELEVATION
  5. 5. DR CHAU CHAK WING BUILDING WEST ELEVATION
  6. 6. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which technologies support aims? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies?
  7. 7. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which technologies support aims? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies?
  8. 8. Hours in paid work 2009 2004 1999 1994 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% JAMES, R. KRAUSE, K. & JENNINGS, C. (2010). The First Year Experience in Australia Universities: Findings from 1994 to 2009.
  9. 9. Attendance at University 50 45 40 35 30 3 days 25 4 days 20 5 days 15 10 5 0 1994 1999 2004 2009 JAMES, R. KRAUSE, K. & JENNINGS, C. (2010). The First Year Experience in Australia Universities: Findings from 1994 to 2009.
  10. 10. Classroom audits Weekly comparison shows that attendance decreases slightly each week over the course of the semester (approx average of 3% per week) Credit: DEGW
  11. 11. Learning spaces: importance to students (2007) 5.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50 0.00 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 85 87
  12. 12. Learning spaces: student perception of performance (2007) 5.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50 0.00 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52 55 58 61 64 67 70 73 76 79 82 85 88
  13. 13. Learning spaces: importance vs. performance 2007 (4.5, 3.4) There are 3.5 (4.65, 3.7) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other adequate spaces on learning areas campus for me to work with other students on group assignments High (4.4, 3.3) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus Importance (3.9, 3.4) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus 3.5 Low Low Performance High
  14. 14. 2008 student photo diaries
  15. 15. Good A really good place, Quiet, Neat, Work in peace & Helpful tutors
  16. 16. Good Library •Quiet •Great place to work •Power points
  17. 17. Bad Building 5B, outside Room 111 • It is beside the lecture hall and there are many students passing by • It is noisy and students cannot concentrate when studying or when having discussion • I would not like to study and have my discussion in that area as it is noisy
  18. 18. Student Feedback: Informal space that does not work well • The area outside the computer labs at building 5. Reasons: - Too noisy (during the day) - Bad lighting.. Really bad lighting - Not suitable for serious study or undisturbed discussions (during peak hours) - However it is a good quite place to study alone for the night.
  19. 19. Bad Building 2 level 4 Atrium • This whole building creates a very dark feel to it, due to the lack of lighting and use of dull colours • Also the space in the middle as shown isn't utilised properly, engineering students don’t have many places to study . Some tables and couches could be placed there to utilise the open space
  20. 20. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which technologies support aims? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies?s paces
  21. 21. 1. An integrated exposure to The UTS professional practice through dynamic and multifaceted model of modes of practice-oriented education learning 2. Professional practice situated in a global workplace, with international mobility and international and cultural engagement as centre piece 3. Learning which is research- inspired and integrated, providing academic rigour with cutting edge technology to equip graduates for life-long learning
  22. 22. 1. An integrated exposure to The UTS professional practice through dynamic and multifaceted model of modes of practice-oriented education learning 2. Professional practice situated in a global workplace, with international mobility and international and cultural engagement as centre piece 3. Learning which is research- inspired and integrated, providing academic rigour with cutting edge technology to equip graduates for life-long learning
  23. 23. • Work-based learning at work Integrated • Work integrated learning site exposure to – Internships professional – Practicum etc • Volunteer activity, Shopfront practice projects etc • Field trips - real and virtual • Simulation and role plays - in class or online • Problem-based or issues- based approaches • Multi-media case studies - including student produced work • Guest lectures or podcasts by professionals at uni
  24. 24. • Course level focus to enable student development eg – embedded academic, information, communication Enabling and technological literacies appropriate to the UTS the discipline/profession – each subject focusing on one or more model aspects of the UTS model – integrative, practice and research- oriented capstone experiences • Authentic learning experiences • Embedded discipline-specific and collaborative technologies • Effective use of formal and informal learning spaces for authentic practice oriented and research integrated learning, collaboration etc
  25. 25. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which technologies support aims? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies?
  26. 26. Student current and preferred involvement in course learning activities that use technologies Develop an e-portfolio Participate in virtual worlds Collaboration using web conferencing Collaboration using Facebook etc Collaboration using wikis Collaboration using documents Share using social AV media (YouTube, Flickr) Share using social bookmarking Use Twitter Preferred Develop and share blogs Current Design and build webpages Create and share AV Use discipline-specific software Use RSS feeds to subscribe to info Listen to student podcasts Join in remote webconference lectures Listen to lecturer podcasts/vodcasts Find info using earch engines Find info using library online resources 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Current or preferred use: a few times a week, daily or more often
  27. 27. Communication with other students and teaching staff Face-to-face Blogs Virtual worlds Social networking eg Facebook, Twitter Mobile phone-voice Students-preferred Students-current Web conferencing eg Skype Teaching staff-preferred Teaching staff-current UTSOnline-discussion boards, mail Email SMS Instant messaging 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70
  28. 28. http://www.review-edu.com/
  29. 29. http://spark.uts.edu.au/
  30. 30. Who are the learners? How to design the curriculum? Which technologies support aims? Which learning spaces support curriculum and technologies?
  31. 31. Creating a Sticky Campus
  32. 32. Example outcomes
  33. 33. 8/18/10
  34. 34. 8/18/10
  35. 35. Credit: DEGW
  36. 36. Credit: DEGW
  37. 37. C
  38. 38. Credit: Anna Zhu
  39. 39. Daily occupancy Credit: learning.space.logic
  40. 40. Student feedback • When asked to rate the space, 92% of students rated it as Good or Very Good • What do you like about the space? – Access to microwaves, free internet, powerpoints (25%) – A good place to study (20%) – Quality of the design – colour and variety of spaces (13%) – Access to computers (11%) – Quiet (10%) Credit: learning.space.logic
  41. 41. Sandpit Credit: learning.space.logic
  42. 42. Study rooms Credit: learning.space.logic
  43. 43. Steps Credit: learning.space.logic
  44. 44. Nooks Credit: learning.space.logic
  45. 45. Learning spaces: importance vs. performance 2007 (4.5, 3.4) There are 3.5 (4.65, 3.7) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other adequate spaces on learning areas 2009 campus for me to work with other students on group assignments High (4.4, 3.3) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus Importance (3.9, 3.4) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus 3.5 Low Low Performance High
  46. 46. Learning spaces: importance vs. performance 2007 (4.5, 3.4) There are 3.5 (4.65, 3.7) My classes are held in sufficient, well equipped lecture theatres, classrooms and other adequate spaces on learning areas 2009 campus for me to work with other students on group assignments 2011 High (4.4, 3.3) There are sufficient quiet places to study on campus Importance (3.9, 3.4) There are sufficient spaces for me to use my laptop on campus 3.5 Low Low Performance High
  47. 47. Some dilemmas #1 the future of f2f lectures
  48. 48. Some dilemmas #3 sustainability
  49. 49. 24 hour spaces need • Regular cleaning • Security • Time to do maintenance • “janitorial” services

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • The question was ‘How often do you, and how often would you like to, engage in the following learning activities that use technologies as part of your course?’The responses represent students who checked ‘a few times a week’ or ‘daily or more often’Current use was lower than preferred use for every item except use of search engines, which is fully within students’ control. (I haven’t put the data through SPSS so am unsure whether all differences are significant.Biggest gaps between current and preferred use related to:listening to/watching podcasts/vodcasts made by lecturers RSS feeds to information relevant to your studiesusing webconferencing etc to join in remotely to lectures or tutorialsuse of discipline-specific softwareOne of the other questions asked ‘Use a tablet computer (egiPad) to access or contribute study-related information on the internet’ Only 5% of students currently do this, but 42% would like to!
  • The responses represent students who checked ‘a few times a week’ or ‘daily or more often’Email, UTSOnline and face-to-face were the most popular current and preferred means of communicating with teaching staff.Methods of communicating with other students are more diverse. Email and F2F are still popular, but SMS comes in third followed by mobile phone calls and social networking sites like Facebook.
  • Sticky campus – new student spaces come online
  • When asked what was missing a significantnumber of students said Nothing (11% ofresponses), however the most commonrequest for additions to this space was thateven more space like this be provided (15%).Students specifically identified that additionalcomputers were required (8%) and that quietspaces for study were needed (7%). Thestudents also suggested that the wirelessprovision the space was too slow for theirneeds (5%).Reflecting the blendednature of studyandrelaxing was alsoreflected in the requestformore Casual Seating (5%). ImportantlystudentsalsowantedBetter Food (8%), Water(5%) and Coffee (5%) suggestingtheyweresettling in thisspacefor significant periods oftime. Thiscorrespondstostudentsreportingtheyspend on average 2 hours in the space.
  • Student Feedback• strong theme of blending study & social: ”Meet with friends to study & socialise” & “study, chill out space”• students wanted more of this kind of space: “this facility should be larger as it is difficult to find a free table/desk”
  • Student Feedback• students liked the privacy that these spaces afforded and requested more of these quiet private spaces
  • Student Feedback• the design, colour and general relaxed feeling of these spaces strongly influenced many of thecomments in the interviews• students want more of these kinds of spaces

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