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Why can't we B.E. friends? by Patrick Bach and Ada Le

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Presented at Impact: 2018 Canadian Service Design Conference, November 29 & 30, 2018 (Montreal, Quebec)

What people say, what people do and what people say they do are three different things. Behavioural Economics (or B.E.) is the scientific study of psychological, emotional and cognitive factors on economic decisions, the belief that human beings are not entirely rational in their decision making. B.E. provides service designers with a new way of measuring the impact of our designs, prototypes and ideas by expanding our understanding of the problem through a deep exploration of behavioural barriers, as well as providing us with new ways of measuring the impact of our prototypes through a rigorous testing methodology.

Veröffentlicht in: Design
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Why can't we B.E. friends? by Patrick Bach and Ada Le

  1. 1. Why Can’t We B.E Friends?
  2. 2. Why Can’t We BEEE Friends?
  3. 3. A little about us ADA LE, PhD Senior Associate Behaviour Economics BEworks @adale PATRICK BACH Director, Service Design CIBC @bachpat Trust
  4. 4. We’ve Dabbled…
  5. 5. “No one wants Service Design. They want their problem solved” – Jakob Schneider, SDGC18 // Author ‘This is Service Design Doing’
  6. 6. All services are fundamentally about placing bets on Human Behaviour. Not as easy as Carrot + Stick = Change
  7. 7. What People Say What People Do What People Say They Do
  8. 8. What is Behavioural Economics?
  9. 9. Behavioral Economics is the scientific study of human behaviour and offers powerful new ways to create and measure change Bounded Rationality: Our decisions are constrained by time, mental energy, and limited willpower Heuristics and Biases: We make shortcuts in our decision-making process. Use mental rules of thumb called heuristics, but we are vulnerable to biases
  10. 10. Behavioural Economics – Nudging Behaviour
  11. 11. Why do some countries have higher organ donation rates?
  12. 12. FACT: Human beings are inherently biased and don’t always make logical decisions.
  13. 13. FACT: (Most) Designers are ill-equipped to navigate the complexities of human psychology and behaviour.
  14. 14. How might we… deepen our understanding of human psychology to enable us to design better services? more clearly identify bias and cognitive barriers to yield better outcomes in our service experiences? collaborate with a different discipline to become better Service Designers?
  15. 15. Service Design (in a nutshell)
  16. 16. Research What Designers Look Like What Behavioural Scientists Look Like
  17. 17. Our interviews found that customers did not feel confident making a decision & their mental models of the product match. Case Study: Value Prop Research Scientific literature review suggested several root causes such as Divided Attention and Fragmented Memory.
  18. 18. Research – B.E In Action • No competing attention • Better encoding into memory • Better comprehension & recall • Items competing for attention • Scattered focus • Poorer comprehension & recall V.S
  19. 19. Research – B.E In Action + • Deeper psychological understanding of the research findings • Codify human behaviour • Informs how to create better service design prototypes
  20. 20. Prototyping What Designers Look Like What Behavioural Scientists Look Like
  21. 21. We co-created a new call flow with customers to provide better advice and ensure customers understood the product. Case Study: Call Center Flow Behavioural Scientists completed a diagnostics of our prototype and identified over a dozen biases and cognitive barriers.
  22. 22. Prototyping – B.E In Action Identify ways to optimize the prototype based on behavioral economics Salience & Urgency Color is used sparingly to draw attention to the message that the deadline has passed and to convey increasing urgency Consistency Customer’s history of timely payments is highlighted to trigger the desire for consistency Chunking Information is chunked so customers only read messages that are personally relevant to them Salience & Urgency Use color sparingly to draw attention to the deadline and create a sense of urgency. Chunking Information is chunked so customers only read messages that are relevant. Consistency Customer’s history of timely payments is highlighted to trigger the desire for consistency.
  23. 23. Testing What Designers Look Like What Behavioural Scientists Look Like
  24. 24. We tested a new brochure to support customers in their decision making and make the product more tangible. Case Study: New Sales Document We tested over 12 different conditions with surgical focus to maximize product comprehension and trust.
  25. 25. Testing – B.E In Action Ability to measure key metrics (comprehension, trust, intention to purchase etc…) Laser focused testing on key behavioural outcomes with multiple conditions
  26. 26. CHALLENGE ASSUMPTIONS PROBLEM ORIENTED BehaviouralEconomics&ServiceDesignshare several similarprinciples&mindsets. HUMAN - CENTRED RIGOROUS TESTING
  27. 27. Key Takeaways Ada says: Patrick says: “Be open to leveraging new methodologies and perspectives! What Makes Service Design so powerful is its multi-disciplinary approach to problem solving” “Human behaviour isn’t something you can necessarily intuit, by employing Behavioural Economics you can leverage bias to help people make better decisions”
  28. 28. THANK YOU!

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