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CHAPTER 7
PERFORMANCE-BASED
TESTS
Traditional standardized
objective test
Alternative assessment mechanism
Multiple choice
tests
PERFORMANCE-BASED
ASSESSMENT
 Best way to gauge a student or pupil
competency in a certain task is
through en situ or on ...
Performance- based
assessment
Observation
En situ on site
•Portfolios of a student’s work overtime
•Student’s demonstration
•hands-on execution of experiments by
students
•Student’...
 Keeping records of all tasks
successfully and skillfully
performed by a student
 Mehrens
Performance testing is
NOT new
ff. PERFORMANCE
TESTING
PROCEDURES
performance-based tests
Performance
Testing
procedures
• performance tasks
• rubrics scoring guides
•Exemplars of
performa...
Performance-based test
 Assess students on what they know
 What they are able to do
 Learning strategies they employ in...
Ex: hands-on execution of
experiments by students
Students’ demonstration
PERFORMANCE TASKS
 Students are required to draw on the
knowledge and skills they possess
 To reflect upon them for use ...
Example: problem solving
skills
 Students or pupils learn optimally by
actually doing (Learning by doing)
-constructivist philosophy
 task need to be co...
Require students to manifest
(a) What they know
(b) Process by which they came to know
it
in addition, performance-based t...
RUBRICS AND
EXEMPLARS
 Rubrics to describe student
performance
 A scoring method that lists the criteria
for a piece of ...
 Perkins et al (1994) provide example
of rubrics scoring for student
 This rubric lists the criteria in the
column on th...
 The report must explain
1) The purposes of the invention
2) The features or parts of the invention
and how they help it ...
 The four columns to the right of the
criteria describe the varying degrees
of quality, from excellent to poor.
Rubrics for an Invention Report
Criteria Quality
(3)
Most acceptable
(2)
Acceptable
(1)
Less acceptable
(0)
Not acceptable...
Creating Rubrics
 1. survey models – show students
examples of good and not-so-good
work. Identify the characteristics th...
 3. agree on the levels of quality –
describe the best and worst levels of
quality, then fill in the middle levels
based ...
 5. use self- and peer-assessment –
give students their task. As they work,
stop them occasionally for self-and-
peer-ass...
 Figure 2 shows a teacher-made rubric
prepared to assess the videotaped:
Reading Rain-bow style” book
talks.(Ann Tanona, ...
Criteria Quality
Did I get my
audience’s
attention?
Creative Boring beginning No beginning
Did I tell what kind
of book?
T...
Tips in Designing Rubrics
Criterion Quality
Gains attention
of audience.
Give details
or an amusing
fact, a series of
ques...
criterion Quality
Gives
enough
details
Yes, I put in
enough
details to
give the
reader a
sense of
time, place,
and events
...
rubrics
 are scales that differentiate levels of
student performance.
 Contain the criteria that must be met
by the stud...
 An exemplar is an example that
delineates the desired characteristics
of quality in ways students can
understand.
Well designed rubrics include:
 Performance dimension that are critical to
successful task completion;
 Criteria that re...
Automating Performance-Based
Tests
 Each performance task/problem that is
used in the test should be clearly
defined in t...
 A user need not always end up
accomplishing the task; hence it is
important milestones that the test
taker reaches while...
 Every aspect of the problem-solving
activity that we wish to test has to lead
to a set of changes in the system, so
that...
THE END.. 
Chapter 7 Performance-based assessment
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Chapter 7 Performance-based assessment

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Chapter 7 Performance-based assessment

  1. 1. CHAPTER 7 PERFORMANCE-BASED TESTS
  2. 2. Traditional standardized objective test Alternative assessment mechanism Multiple choice tests
  3. 3. PERFORMANCE-BASED ASSESSMENT  Best way to gauge a student or pupil competency in a certain task is through en situ or on site.  A performance-based test -assess students on what they know, what they are able to do and the learning strategies they employ in the process of demonstrating it.
  4. 4. Performance- based assessment Observation En situ on site
  5. 5. •Portfolios of a student’s work overtime •Student’s demonstration •hands-on execution of experiments by students •Student’s work in simulated environment (APPROACH) Bryant
  6. 6.  Keeping records of all tasks successfully and skillfully performed by a student
  7. 7.  Mehrens Performance testing is NOT new ff. PERFORMANCE TESTING PROCEDURES
  8. 8. performance-based tests Performance Testing procedures • performance tasks • rubrics scoring guides •Exemplars of performanceRequire students to perform a certain task or activity or perhaps solve complex problems
  9. 9. Performance-based test  Assess students on what they know  What they are able to do  Learning strategies they employ in the process of demonstrating it
  10. 10. Ex: hands-on execution of experiments by students
  11. 11. Students’ demonstration
  12. 12. PERFORMANCE TASKS  Students are required to draw on the knowledge and skills they possess  To reflect upon them for use in the particular task at hand  Task require a combination of the two approaches
  13. 13. Example: problem solving skills
  14. 14.  Students or pupils learn optimally by actually doing (Learning by doing) -constructivist philosophy  task need to be consistent with the intended outcomes of the curriculum and the objectives of instruction
  15. 15. Require students to manifest (a) What they know (b) Process by which they came to know it in addition, performance-based test require that tasks involve examining the processes as well as the products of student learning,
  16. 16. RUBRICS AND EXEMPLARS  Rubrics to describe student performance  A scoring method that lists the criteria for a piece of work, or “ what counts” (for example, purpose, organization, details, voice, and mechanics are often what count in a piece of writing);
  17. 17.  Perkins et al (1994) provide example of rubrics scoring for student  This rubric lists the criteria in the column on the left
  18. 18.  The report must explain 1) The purposes of the invention 2) The features or parts of the invention and how they help it serve its purposes. 3) The pros and cons of the design 4) How the design connects to other things past, present, and future.
  19. 19.  The four columns to the right of the criteria describe the varying degrees of quality, from excellent to poor.
  20. 20. Rubrics for an Invention Report Criteria Quality (3) Most acceptable (2) Acceptable (1) Less acceptable (0) Not acceptable Purposes The report explains the key purposes of the invention and points out less obvious ones as well The report explains all of the key purposes of the invention The report explains some of the purposes of the invention but misses key purposes The report does not refer to the purposes of the invention Features The report details both key and hidden features of the invention and explain how they serve several purposes The report details the key features of the invention and explains the purposes they serve The report neglects some features of the invention or the purposes they serve The report does not detail the features of the invention or the purposes they serve. Critique The report discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the invention, and suggest ways in which it can be improved The report discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the invention the report Discusses either the strengths and weaknesses of the invention but not both. The report does not Mention the strengths or the weaknesses of the invention Connections The report makes appropriate connections between the purposes and features of the invention and many different kinds of phenomena The report makes appropriate connections between purposes and features of the invention and one or two phenomena The report makes unclear or inappropriate connections between the invention and other phenomena. The report makes no connections between the invention and other things SUB-TOTALS Average:__________ Figure 1 – Prototype of Rubric Scoring
  21. 21. Creating Rubrics  1. survey models – show students examples of good and not-so-good work. Identify the characteristics that make the good ones good and the bad ones bad.  2. define criteria- from the discussions on the models, identify the qualities that define good work.
  22. 22.  3. agree on the levels of quality – describe the best and worst levels of quality, then fill in the middle levels based on your knowledge of common problems and the discussion of not- so-good work.  4. practice on models- using the agreed criteria and levels of quality, evaluate the models presented in step 1 together with the students.
  23. 23.  5. use self- and peer-assessment – give students their task. As they work, stop them occasionally for self-and- peer-assessment.  6. revise- always give students time to revise their work based on the feedback they get in step 5.  7. use teacher assessment- use the same rubric students used to assess their work yourself.
  24. 24.  Figure 2 shows a teacher-made rubric prepared to assess the videotaped: Reading Rain-bow style” book talks.(Ann Tanona, a second grade teacher, as lifted from heide Andrade, 2007. http:www.yahoo.com).
  25. 25. Criteria Quality Did I get my audience’s attention? Creative Boring beginning No beginning Did I tell what kind of book? Tells exactly what type of book it is Not sure, not clear Didn’t mention it Did I tell something about the setting? Tells when and where story takes place Slid over character Did not tell anything about main character Did I mention the setting? Tells when and where story takes place Not sure, not clear Didn’t mention setting Did I tell one interesting part? Made it sound interesting- I want to buy it! Told part and skipped on to something else Forgot to do it Did I tell who might like this book? Did I tell Skipped over it Forgot to tell How did I look? Hair combed, neat, clean clothes, smiled, looked up, happy Lazy look Just-go-out-of-bed look, head down Figure 2 – Book Talk Rubric
  26. 26. Tips in Designing Rubrics Criterion Quality Gains attention of audience. Give details or an amusing fact, a series of questions, a short demonstration, a colorful visual or a personal reason why they picked this topic. Does a two- sentence introduction, then starts speech. Gives a one- sentence introduction, then starts speech Does not attempt to gain attention of audience, just starts speech. Figure 3. -Rubric for an Oral Presentation
  27. 27. criterion Quality Gives enough details Yes, I put in enough details to give the reader a sense of time, place, and events Yes, I put in some details, but some key details are missing No, I didn’t put in enough details, but I did include a few. No, I had almost no details. Figure 4- Rubric for evaluating a Scrapbook (lifted from Andrade, 2007
  28. 28. rubrics  are scales that differentiate levels of student performance.  Contain the criteria that must be met by the student and the judgment process that will be used to rate how well the student has performed.
  29. 29.  An exemplar is an example that delineates the desired characteristics of quality in ways students can understand.
  30. 30. Well designed rubrics include:  Performance dimension that are critical to successful task completion;  Criteria that reflect all the important outcomes of the performance task;  A rating scale that provides a usable, easily- interpreted score;  Criteria that reflect concrete references, in clear language understandable to students, parent, and other teachers;
  31. 31. Automating Performance-Based Tests  Each performance task/problem that is used in the test should be clearly defined in terms of performance standards not only for the end result but also for the strategies used in various stages of process.
  32. 32.  A user need not always end up accomplishing the task; hence it is important milestones that the test taker reaches while solving the problem.  Having defined the possible strategies, the process and milestones, selection of tasks that comprise a test should allow the design of good rubrics for scoring.
  33. 33.  Every aspect of the problem-solving activity that we wish to test has to lead to a set of changes in the system, so that the testing software can collect evidence of the student’s competency.
  34. 34. THE END.. 

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