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Pharma in Switzerland

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Pharma in Switzerland

  1. 1. Sources: Interpharma, 2013/2014 and BFS, 2012 Source: interpharma, 2014 Merck Serono UCB Amgen Biogen Idec Pfizer Novartis Roche Janssen-Cilag Vifor Pharma Actelion Top ten companies according to the number of employees in Switzerland in 2013 70.8 CHF billion in pharmaeceutical industry exports 23.7CHF billion in gross added value 247Companies 39,500Employees SWITZERLAND AS A PHARMA HUB AT A GLANCE A third of Swiss exports come from the pharmaceutical industry, making this industry a large contributor to the Swiss national economy. Both multinational corporations, such as Roche and Novartis, and small and medium-sized pharmaceutical companies have excel- lent infrastructure and skilled employees at their disposal in Switzerland. The cooperation between large and small companies and the proximity to research institutions offer an ideal environment for research and innovation and form the basis for a highly-specialized production location. Switzerland's sophisticated healthcare system also offers the best possible conditions as a test and sales market into which products can be introduced. 6.2CHF billion in R&D investments Swiss pharmaceutical industry exports Share of overall exports (in %) Source: Swiss Federal Customs Adminis- tration, 2015 Pharmaceutical exports All other exports 18% 82% 34% 66% 2000 2014 KEY FIGURES OFFICIAL PROGRAM
  2. 2. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (R&D) • There are a great number of highly qualified scientists at the country's disposal due to Switzerland being home to the world's leading universities and research-based pharmaceuti- cal companies, all of which boast solid capital bases. Novartis employs around 2,700 geneticists, pharmacologists, biologists and other specialists and, in 2012 alone, registered a total of 660 patent applications. Roche employs around 3,000 researchers and submitted 460 patents. • Roche and Novartis invested a total of CHF 17.8 billion, or around 18% of its turnover, in research and development global- ly in 2013. When put together, the R&D departments of all Swiss pharamceutical companies invested over CHF 6 billion. Global Innovation Index 2014 The ten most innovative countries in the world Country Ranking Switzerland 1 United Kingdom 2 Sweden 3 Finland 4 Netherlands 5 USA 6 Singapore 7 Luxembourg 8 Hong Kong 9 Ireland 10 Source: INSEAD, Cornell University und WIPO, 2014 • The ETH's Department for System Biology, which comprises 15 professors and 300 employees, will be moved to a new building by 2020 and is expected to grow to 500 employees. 956 people studied Life Sciences as part of a Bachelor, Master's or Doctorate degree at the EPFL in 2013, while 1,326 people attended Life Science courses at technical colleges that same year. • The Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel devotes itself to fun- damental biomedical research and employs 300 international members of staff. • An extremely large number of pharmaceutical specialists work in industries such as ICT, electronics and medical technology. Source: BAK Basel Economics; OECD REGPAT database, 2012 Pharmaceutical patent applications submitted to the European Patent Office Applications per Mio inhabitants; Average 2000-2010 100 80 60 40 20 0 CHDK SE US DE NL UK FR IT • Efficient and straightforward application procedures are in place to protect intellectual property. Switzerland is one of the countries with the highest number of pharmaceutical compa- nies per capita when compared with other countries. It also has an extensive range of speclalists offering the best possible IP marketing (licencing, patent transactions or strategic partner- ships). • It takes around eleven months to obtain a license for a new pharmaceutical product from the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products Swissmedic (excluding time required by the company internally), making the Swiss registration procedure one of the fastest application procedures worldwide. A normal evaluation of a license application for human medicine with a new active substance costs CHF 70,000 (CHF 105,000 to expedite the proce- dure). • The laboratory technicians in Switzerland tend to show long- term loyalty to their employers, meaning there is a low staff turnover rate – this is in contrast to the situation in the USA where the majority of researchers are not employed permanently and third-party funding is spent on projects. Frequent change in staff can lead to a loss of know-how. COSTS AND FINANCING • Switzerland is by far the most significant stock exchange for Life Science companies in Europe. Around a third of market capital- ization on the SIX Swiss Exchange is attributable to Life Science companies. 42% of the capitalization of European Life Science companies can be found on the SIX. • The Swiss Federal Commission for Technology and Innovation (KTI) promotes the transfer of technology by funding up to 50% of expenses for R&D projects involving collaborative efforts be- tween the industry and universities. Approximately 1,000 research positions are funded in this way each year. The companies are granted the IP rights. • National education institutions and universities provide pre- seed and seedfunding amounting to CHF 30,000-150,000. 16.7 33.333.937.0 43.2 52.052.0 85.5 94.5
  3. 3. • In recent years, the added-value within the Swiss pharma- ceutical industry has continued to increase more signficantly than in other country. • The top-class infrastructure of technology and innovation parks and research institutions such as Campus Biotech in Gene- va, Bio-Technopark in Zurich and EPFL Innovation Park and Biopole in Lausanne promotes startups and spin-offs. Further- more, additional innovation parks are being planned through- out the country (please refer to current developments). • Startups or newly established foreign companies are completely or partially exempt from paying corporate and capital taxes at cantonal level for up to 10 years. • The Canton of Nidwalden grants tax incentives for income from intellectual property through license box. These incentives are taxed at a lower tax rate of 8.8% (instead of 12.7%). • A reduced value added tax rate of 2.5% applies to chemical and pharmaceutical products. FRAMEWORK CONDITIONS AND MARKET ENTRY • Free trade agreements with the EU and 38 other countries, in- cluding China, guarantee access to the most important export markets. EUR 192.5 million are saved yearly through pharma- ceutical and chemical exports to Germany, France, Austria and the United Kingdom alone. Furthermore, Switzerland has the most concentrated network of bilateral investment protection agreements after Germany and China • Mutual recognition of conformity and quality control leads to significant cost savings when trading with the EU, the EEA, the EFTA States and Canada. The savings in the pharmaceutical industry alone amount to CHF 150-300 million each year. • Due to the international recognition of its high quality standards, Switzerland is well-suited to being a strategic test market ("early adopter market") for introducing new medical products. • In contrast to other countries, a single authority governs the li- cense applications in the biotechnology and genetic engineering sector (Federal Coordination Center for Biotechnology), ensur- ing less bureaucracy and straightfoward procedures. • The Swiss Export Risk Insurance SERV, an independent insti- tution governed by public law, guarantees protection for high-risk export transactions. Insurance policies and insurance commit- ments amounting to CHF 1.7 billion in principe were issued for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry in 2013 (www.serv-ch. com). • The interim financial statement for the EU's seventh research framework program (2007 – 2013) exemplifies how competetive Swiss researchers are on an international level. Switzerland re- ceived around CHF 1,560 million in funding between 2007 and mid-2012. Switzerland also had the fourth highest success rate with submitted projects over this period. • SMEs, which invest more than 10% of their turnover in research and development, are eligible to receive financial support as part of the Eurostar's support program. The budget allocated until 2020 amounts to EUR 1.14 billion. Switzerland is funding projects with up to a maximum amount of EUR 500,000. • The Swiss life science industry has the highest level of produc- tivity compared to other top international locations. 100 80 60 40 20 0 Source: BAKBASEL, 2014 (international data according to the BAKBASEL database 2013, Swiss data in accordance with ESA 2010.) Added value in the pharmaceutical industry Growth rate per year in ‰; average 2002-2012 NLCH DE DK SE UK US FR IT Source: BAKBASEL, 2014 (international data according to the BAKBASEL database 2013, Swiss data in accordance with ESA 2010.) Productivity of the Life Sciences industry in an international comparison per employee (in K USD, adjusted for purchasing power), 2012 250 200 150 100 50 0 Switzerland 300 Boston Öresund SF Bay Area New York Paris Life sciences Overall economy 91 6061 43 41 36 32 18 14 286 79 277 121 268 73 244 226 180 135 132 105
  4. 4. Publications Importance of the pharmaceutical industry in Switzerland www.interpharma.ch > Fakten & Statistiken > Pharma-Markt Schweiz (in German) European Life Science Cluster Report 2013 www.kpmg.com > Switzerland > Research > Articles & Publications Legal basis for health www.bag.admin.ch > Documentation > Legislation S-GE Resources Handbook for Investors s-ge.com/handbookforinvestors This factsheet was produced wth the kind support of interpharma and BAK Basel. Authorities and Regulators State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation SBFI www.sbfi.admin.ch Federal Office for Health www.bag.admin.ch Swiss Federal Approval and Regula- tory Authority for Medicines www.swissmedic.ch Swiss National Funds www.snf.ch Swiss Federal Commission for Technology and Innovation KTI www.kti.admin.ch Institute of Intellectual Property IGE www.ige.ch Associations and Networks www.interpharma.ch www.scienceindustries.ch www.vips.ch www.gensuisse.ch www.switt.ch Innovation and Startup Support www.agire.ch www.bioalps.org www.biobank-suisse.ch www.biopole.ch www.biovalley.ch www.bio-technopark.ch www.campusbiotech.ch www.lifescience-zurich.ch www.lsnb.ch www.swissparks.ch www.swissinnovationpark.ch Financing www.cti-invest.ch www.ctistartup.ch www.six-swiss-exchange.ch www.seca.ch www.venturefund.novartis.com www.newventuretec.com www.devigier.ch www.hbmhealthcare.com TESTIMONIAL "Helsinn follows an integrated licensing strategy that enables us to benefit from the network of international pharmaceutical companies located in Switzerland, as well as specialist local companies. Helsinn licenses new materials from these companies at an early stage and enhances them before marketing them. Switzerland is an ideal location for us with it being close to other pharmaceutical companies and top researchers with spin-off ideas, as well as leading research institutions and hospitals." RICCARDO BRAGLIA CEO of Helsinn Holding SA www.helsinn.com CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS • The state government is planning to establish a National Inno- vation Park (www.swissinnovationpark.ch), which will enhance Switzerland's strength as a leading innovation and research cen- ter with a variety of hubs and network locations. The first centers are due to open at the start of 2016. • The Federal Council adopted a master plan for promoting bio- medical research and technology in December 2013. This plan will help to maintain Switzerland's long-term appeal as a research location in the pharmaceutical sector. • The Swiss parliament has requested that the state gov- ernment develop proposals for setting up a Future Fund (www.zukunftsfondsschweiz.ch). These proposals will involve pension funds investing venture capital in promising economic sectors, including the biotechnology sector. • Bilateral agreements ensure privileged access to the EU domestic and employment market as well as programs for research promotion in the EU. Negotiations are currently being held between Switzerland and the EU with the aim of maintaining the framework conditions relating to market entry, the recruiting of skilled workers and a research cooperation. • The state government has initiated a reform process to adapt company taxation to the new international standards, which are currently being developed by the OECD. An important element of the reform is the fiscal promotion of R&D via license boxes, a new development from which the pharmaceutical companies are expected to benefit significantly. CONTACTS AND FURTHER INFORMATION Switzerland Global Enterprise T +41 44 365 51 51 | invest@s-ge.com | s-ge.com/invest

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