Class 12th Solids and semiconductor devices part 1

SOLIDS AND SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES - I
1. Energy Bands in Solids
2. Energy Band Diagram
3. Metals, Semiconductors and Insulators
4. Intrinsic Semiconductor
5. Electrons and Holes
6. Doping of a Semiconductor
7. Extrinsic Semiconductor
8. N-type and P-type Semiconductor
9. Carrier Concentration in Semiconductors
10.Distinction between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Semiconductors
11.Distinction between Semiconductor and Metal
12.Conductivity of a Semiconductor
Energy Bands in Solids:
 According to Quantum Mechanical Laws, the energies of electrons in a
free atom can not have arbitrary values but only some definite
(quantized) values.
 However, if an atom belongs to a crystal, then the energy levels are
modified.
 This modification is not appreciable in the case of energy levels of
electrons in the inner shells (completely filled).
 But in the outermost shells, modification is appreciable because the
electrons are shared by many neighbouring atoms.
 Due to influence of high electric field between the core of the atoms and
the shared electrons, energy levels are split-up or spread out forming
energy bands.
Consider a single crystal of silicon having N atoms. Each atom can be
associated with a lattice site.
Electronic configuration of Si is 1s2, 2s2, 2p6,3s2, 3p2. (Atomic No. is 14)
O
• •
• •
• •• •• •
• •
• •
1s2
2s2
2p6
3p2
3s2
Inter atomic spacing (r)
Energy
a b c d
Conduction Band
Valence Band
Forbidden Energy Gap
Ion
core
state
Formation of Energy Bands in Solids:
Each of N atoms has its own energy levels. The energy levels are identical,
sharp, discrete and distinct.
The outer two sub-shells (3s and 3p of M shell or n = 3 shell) of silicon atom
contain two s electrons and two p electrons. So, there are 2N electrons
completely filling 2N possible s levels, all of which are at the same energy.
Of the 6N possible p levels, only 2N are filled and all the filled p levels have
the same energy.
(ii) Oc < r < Od:
There is no visible splitting of energy levels but there develops a tendency
for the splitting of energy levels.
(iii) r = Oc:
The interaction between the outermost shell electrons of neighbouring
silicon atoms becomes appreciable and the splitting of the energy levels
commences.
(i) r = Od (>> Oa):
(iv) Ob < r < Oc:
The energy corresponding to the s and p levels of each atom gets slightly
changed. Corresponding to a single s level of an isolated atom, we get 2N
levels. Similarly, there are 6N levels for a single p level of an isolated atom.
Since N is a very large number (≈ 1029 atoms / m3) and the energy of each level
is of a few eV, therefore, the levels due to the spreading are very closely
spaced. The spacing is ≈ 10-23 eV for a 1 cm3 crystal.
The collection of very closely spaced energy levels is called an energy band.
(v) r = Ob:
The energy gap disappears completely. 8N levels are distributed
continuously. We can only say that 4N levels are filled and 4N levels are
empty.
(v) r = Oa:
The band of 4N filled energy levels is separated from the band of 4N unfilled
energy levels by an energy gap called forbidden gap or energy gap or
band gap.
The lower completely filled band (with valence electrons) is called the
valence band and the upper unfilled band is called the conduction band.
Note:
1. The exact energy band picture depends on the relative orientation of
atoms in a crystal.
2. If the bands in a solid are completely filled, the electrons are not permitted
to move about, because there are no vacant energy levels available.
Metals:
Conduction Band
• •• •• •
Valence Band
Partially filled
Conduction Band
• •• •• •
The first possible energy band diagram
shows that the conduction band is only
partially filled with electrons.
With a little extra energy the electrons
can easily reach the empty energy
levels above the filled ones and the
conduction is possible.
The second possible energy band
diagram shows that the conduction
band is overlapping with the valence
band.
This is because the lowest levels in the
conduction band needs less energy
than the highest levels in the valence
band.
The electrons in valence band overflow
into conduction band and are free to
move about in the crystal for
conduction.
The highest energy level in the
conduction band occupied by
electrons in a crystal, at absolute 0
temperature, is called Fermi Level.
The energy corresponding to this
energy level is called Fermi energy.
If the electrons get enough energy
to go beyond this level, then
conduction takes place.
Conduction Band
Valence Band
Forbidden Energy Gap
• •••
≈1 eV
Semiconductors:
Eg-Si = 1.1 eV EgGe= 0.74 eV
At absolute zero temperature, no
electron has energy to jump from
valence band to conduction band
and hence the crystal is an insulator.
At room temperature, some valence
electrons gain energy more than the
energy gap and move to conduction
band to conduct even under the
influence of a weak electric field.
The fraction is p α e
-
Eg
kB T
Since Eg is small, therefore, the fraction
is sizeable for semiconductors.
As an electron leaves the valence band, it leaves some energy level in band
as unfilled.
Such unfilled regions are termed as ‘holes’ in the valence band. They are
mathematically taken as positive charge carriers.
Any movement of this region is referred to a positive hole moving from one
position to another.
•• ••
Conduction Band
Forbidden Energy Gap
Valence Band
• •• •• •
≈6 eV
Insulators:
Eg-Diamond = 7 eV
Electrons, however heated, can not
practically jump to conduction band
from valence band due to a large
energy gap. Therefore, conduction is
not possible in insulators.
Electrons and Holes:
On receiving an additional energy, one of the electrons from a covalent band
breaks and is free to move in the crystal lattice.
While coming out of the covalent bond, it leaves behind a vacancy named
‘hole’.
An electron from the neighbouring atom can break away and can come to the
place of the missing electron (or hole) completing the covalent bond and
creating a hole at another place.
The holes move randomly in a crystal lattice.
The completion of a bond may not be necessarily due to an electron from a
bond of a neighbouring atom. The bond may be completed by a conduction
band electron. i.e., free electron and this is referred to as ‘electron – hole
recombination’.
Intrinsic or Pure Semiconductor:
C.B
V.B
Eg 0.74 eV
Heat Energy
+
+
+
Ge Ge
Ge Ge
Ge Ge
Ge Ge
Ge Ge
Ge Ge
Ge Ge
Ge Ge
Broken Covalent Bond
Free electron ( - )
Valence electrons
Covalent Bond
Hole ( + )
Intrinsic Semiconductor is a pure semiconductor.
The energy gap in Si is 1.1 eV and in Ge is 0.74 eV.
Ge: 1s2, 2s2, 2p6,3s2, 3p6, 3d10, 4s2, 4p2. (Atomic No. is 32)
Si: 1s2, 2s2, 2p6,3s2, 3p2. (Atomic No. is 14)
In intrinsic semiconductor, the number of thermally generated electrons
always equals the number of holes.
So, if ni and pi are the concentration of electrons and holes respectively, then
ni = pi.
The quantity ni or pi is referred to as the ‘intrinsic carrier concentration’.
Doping a Semiconductor:
Doping is the process of deliberate addition of a very small amount of
impurity into an intrinsic semiconductor.
The impurity atoms are called ‘dopants’.
The semiconductor containing impurity is known as ‘impure or extrinsic
semiconductor’.
Methods of doping:
i) Heating the crystal in the presence of dopant atoms.
ii) Adding impurity atoms in the molten state of semiconductor.
iii) Bombarding semiconductor by ions of impurity atoms.
Extrinsic or Impure Semiconductor:
N - Type Semiconductors:
Ge Ge Ge
Ge
Ge
Ge
Ge Ge
+
+
As
0.045 eV
Eg = 0.74 eV
C.B
V.B
Donor level
-
When a semiconductor of Group IV (tetra valent) such as Si or Ge is doped
with a penta valent impurity (Group V elements such as P, As or Sb), N –
type semiconductor is formed.
When germanium (Ge) is doped with arsenic (As), the four valence
electrons of As form covalent bonds with four Ge atoms and the fifth
electron of As atom is loosely bound.
The energy required to detach the fifth loosely bound electron is only of
the order of 0.045 eV for germanium.
A small amount of energy provided due to thermal agitation is sufficient to
detach this electron and it is ready to conduct current.
The force of attraction between this mobile electron and the positively
charged (+ 5) impurity ion is weakened by the dielectric constant of the
medium.
So, such electrons from impurity atoms will have energies slightly less
than the energies of the electrons in the conduction band.
Therefore, the energy state corresponding to the fifth electron is in the
forbidden gap and slightly below the lower level of the conduction band.
This energy level is called ‘donor level’.
The impurity atom is called ‘donor’.
N – type semiconductor is called ‘donor – type semiconductor’.
When intrinsic semiconductor is doped with donor impurities, not only does
the number of electrons increase, but also the number of holes decreases
below that which would be available in the intrinsic semiconductor.
The number of holes decreases because the larger number of electrons
present causes the rate of recombination of electrons with holes to increase.
Consequently, in an N-type semiconductor, free electrons are the majority
charge carriers and holes are the minority charge carriers.
Carrier Concentration in N - Type Semiconductors:
If n and p represent the electron and hole concentrations respectively in
N-type semiconductor, then
n p = ni pi = ni
2
where ni and pi are the intrinsic carrier concentrations.
The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is proportional to n and p.
Or, the rate of recombination is proportional to the product np. Since the
rate of recombination is fixed at a given temperature, therefore, the product
np must be a constant.
When the concentration of electrons is increased above the intrinsic value
by the addition of donor impurities, the concentration of holes falls below
its intrinsic value, making the product np a constant, equal to ni
2.
P - Type Semiconductors:
When a semiconductor of Group IV (tetra valent) such as Si or Ge is doped
with a tri valent impurity (Group III elements such as In, B or Ga), P – type
semiconductor is formed.
When germanium (Ge) is doped with indium (In), the three valence
electrons of In form three covalent bonds with three Ge atoms. The
vacancy that exists with the fourth covalent bond with fourth Ge atom
constitutes a hole.
Ge Ge Ge
Ge
Ge
Ge
Ge Ge
+
+
In 0.05 eV
Eg = 0.74 eV
C.B
V.B
Acceptor level
The hole which is deliberately created may be filled with an electron from
neighbouring atom, creating a hole in that position from where the electron
jumped.
Therefore, the tri valent impurity atom is called ‘acceptor’.
Since the hole is associated with a positive charge moving from one position
to another, therefore, this type of semiconductor is called
P – type semiconductor.
The acceptor impurity produces an energy level just above the valence band.
This energy level is called ‘acceptor level’.
The energy difference between the acceptor energy level and the top of the
valence band is much smaller than the band gap.
Electrons from the valence band can, therefore, easily move into the acceptor
level by being thermally agitated.
P – type semiconductor is called ‘acceptor – type semiconductor’.
In a P – type semiconductor, holes are the majority charge carriers and the
electrons are the minority charge carriers.
It can be shown that, n p = ni pi = ni
2
Distinction between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Semiconductor:
S. No. Intrinsic SC Extrinsic SC
1 Pure Group IV elements. Group III or Group V elements
are introduced in Group IV
elements.
2 Conductivity is only slight. Conductivity is greatly
increased.
3 Conductivity increases with rise
in temperature.
Conductivity depends on the
amount of impurity added.
4 The number of holes is always
equal to the number of free
electrons.
In N-type, the no. of electrons is
greater than that of the holes
and in P-type, the no. holes is
greater than that of the
electrons.
Distinction between Semiconductor and Metal:
S. No. Semiconductor Metal
1 Semiconductor behaves like an
insulator at 0 K. Its conductivity
increases with rise in
temperature.
Conductivity decreases with
rise in temperature.
2 Conductivity increases with rise
in potential difference applied.
Conductivity is an intrinsic
property of a metal and is
independent of applied potential
difference.
3 Does not obey Ohm’s law or
only partially obeys.
Obeys Ohm’s law.
4 Doping the semiconductors with
impurities vastly increases the
conductivity.
Making alloy with another metal
decreases the conductivity.
σ = e (neμe + nhμh)Or
Electrical Conductivity of Semiconductors:
E
IeIhI = Ie + Ih
Ie = neeAve Ih = nheAvh
So, I = neeAve + nheAvh
If the applied electric field is small,
then semiconductor obeys Ohm’s law.
V
R
= neeAve + nheAvh
= eA (neve + nhvh)
Or
V A
ρl
= eA (neve + nhvh)
since
A
ρl
R =
E
ρ
= e (neve + nhvh) since E =
l
V
Mobility (μ) is defined as the drift
velocity per unit electric field.
1
ρ
= e (neμe + nhμh)
Note:
1. The electron mobility is higher than the hole mobility.
2. The resistivity / conductivity depends not only on the
electron and hole densities but also on their mobilities.
3. The mobility depends relatively weakly on temperature. End of S & SC - I
I
1 von 18

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Class 12th Solids and semiconductor devices part 1

  • 1. SOLIDS AND SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES - I 1. Energy Bands in Solids 2. Energy Band Diagram 3. Metals, Semiconductors and Insulators 4. Intrinsic Semiconductor 5. Electrons and Holes 6. Doping of a Semiconductor 7. Extrinsic Semiconductor 8. N-type and P-type Semiconductor 9. Carrier Concentration in Semiconductors 10.Distinction between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Semiconductors 11.Distinction between Semiconductor and Metal 12.Conductivity of a Semiconductor
  • 2. Energy Bands in Solids:  According to Quantum Mechanical Laws, the energies of electrons in a free atom can not have arbitrary values but only some definite (quantized) values.  However, if an atom belongs to a crystal, then the energy levels are modified.  This modification is not appreciable in the case of energy levels of electrons in the inner shells (completely filled).  But in the outermost shells, modification is appreciable because the electrons are shared by many neighbouring atoms.  Due to influence of high electric field between the core of the atoms and the shared electrons, energy levels are split-up or spread out forming energy bands. Consider a single crystal of silicon having N atoms. Each atom can be associated with a lattice site. Electronic configuration of Si is 1s2, 2s2, 2p6,3s2, 3p2. (Atomic No. is 14)
  • 3. O • • • • • •• •• • • • • • 1s2 2s2 2p6 3p2 3s2 Inter atomic spacing (r) Energy a b c d Conduction Band Valence Band Forbidden Energy Gap Ion core state Formation of Energy Bands in Solids:
  • 4. Each of N atoms has its own energy levels. The energy levels are identical, sharp, discrete and distinct. The outer two sub-shells (3s and 3p of M shell or n = 3 shell) of silicon atom contain two s electrons and two p electrons. So, there are 2N electrons completely filling 2N possible s levels, all of which are at the same energy. Of the 6N possible p levels, only 2N are filled and all the filled p levels have the same energy. (ii) Oc < r < Od: There is no visible splitting of energy levels but there develops a tendency for the splitting of energy levels. (iii) r = Oc: The interaction between the outermost shell electrons of neighbouring silicon atoms becomes appreciable and the splitting of the energy levels commences. (i) r = Od (>> Oa): (iv) Ob < r < Oc: The energy corresponding to the s and p levels of each atom gets slightly changed. Corresponding to a single s level of an isolated atom, we get 2N levels. Similarly, there are 6N levels for a single p level of an isolated atom.
  • 5. Since N is a very large number (≈ 1029 atoms / m3) and the energy of each level is of a few eV, therefore, the levels due to the spreading are very closely spaced. The spacing is ≈ 10-23 eV for a 1 cm3 crystal. The collection of very closely spaced energy levels is called an energy band. (v) r = Ob: The energy gap disappears completely. 8N levels are distributed continuously. We can only say that 4N levels are filled and 4N levels are empty. (v) r = Oa: The band of 4N filled energy levels is separated from the band of 4N unfilled energy levels by an energy gap called forbidden gap or energy gap or band gap. The lower completely filled band (with valence electrons) is called the valence band and the upper unfilled band is called the conduction band. Note: 1. The exact energy band picture depends on the relative orientation of atoms in a crystal. 2. If the bands in a solid are completely filled, the electrons are not permitted to move about, because there are no vacant energy levels available.
  • 6. Metals: Conduction Band • •• •• • Valence Band Partially filled Conduction Band • •• •• • The first possible energy band diagram shows that the conduction band is only partially filled with electrons. With a little extra energy the electrons can easily reach the empty energy levels above the filled ones and the conduction is possible. The second possible energy band diagram shows that the conduction band is overlapping with the valence band. This is because the lowest levels in the conduction band needs less energy than the highest levels in the valence band. The electrons in valence band overflow into conduction band and are free to move about in the crystal for conduction. The highest energy level in the conduction band occupied by electrons in a crystal, at absolute 0 temperature, is called Fermi Level. The energy corresponding to this energy level is called Fermi energy. If the electrons get enough energy to go beyond this level, then conduction takes place.
  • 7. Conduction Band Valence Band Forbidden Energy Gap • ••• ≈1 eV Semiconductors: Eg-Si = 1.1 eV EgGe= 0.74 eV At absolute zero temperature, no electron has energy to jump from valence band to conduction band and hence the crystal is an insulator. At room temperature, some valence electrons gain energy more than the energy gap and move to conduction band to conduct even under the influence of a weak electric field. The fraction is p α e - Eg kB T Since Eg is small, therefore, the fraction is sizeable for semiconductors. As an electron leaves the valence band, it leaves some energy level in band as unfilled. Such unfilled regions are termed as ‘holes’ in the valence band. They are mathematically taken as positive charge carriers. Any movement of this region is referred to a positive hole moving from one position to another. •• ••
  • 8. Conduction Band Forbidden Energy Gap Valence Band • •• •• • ≈6 eV Insulators: Eg-Diamond = 7 eV Electrons, however heated, can not practically jump to conduction band from valence band due to a large energy gap. Therefore, conduction is not possible in insulators. Electrons and Holes: On receiving an additional energy, one of the electrons from a covalent band breaks and is free to move in the crystal lattice. While coming out of the covalent bond, it leaves behind a vacancy named ‘hole’. An electron from the neighbouring atom can break away and can come to the place of the missing electron (or hole) completing the covalent bond and creating a hole at another place. The holes move randomly in a crystal lattice. The completion of a bond may not be necessarily due to an electron from a bond of a neighbouring atom. The bond may be completed by a conduction band electron. i.e., free electron and this is referred to as ‘electron – hole recombination’.
  • 9. Intrinsic or Pure Semiconductor: C.B V.B Eg 0.74 eV Heat Energy + + + Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Broken Covalent Bond Free electron ( - ) Valence electrons Covalent Bond Hole ( + )
  • 10. Intrinsic Semiconductor is a pure semiconductor. The energy gap in Si is 1.1 eV and in Ge is 0.74 eV. Ge: 1s2, 2s2, 2p6,3s2, 3p6, 3d10, 4s2, 4p2. (Atomic No. is 32) Si: 1s2, 2s2, 2p6,3s2, 3p2. (Atomic No. is 14) In intrinsic semiconductor, the number of thermally generated electrons always equals the number of holes. So, if ni and pi are the concentration of electrons and holes respectively, then ni = pi. The quantity ni or pi is referred to as the ‘intrinsic carrier concentration’. Doping a Semiconductor: Doping is the process of deliberate addition of a very small amount of impurity into an intrinsic semiconductor. The impurity atoms are called ‘dopants’. The semiconductor containing impurity is known as ‘impure or extrinsic semiconductor’. Methods of doping: i) Heating the crystal in the presence of dopant atoms. ii) Adding impurity atoms in the molten state of semiconductor. iii) Bombarding semiconductor by ions of impurity atoms.
  • 11. Extrinsic or Impure Semiconductor: N - Type Semiconductors: Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge + + As 0.045 eV Eg = 0.74 eV C.B V.B Donor level - When a semiconductor of Group IV (tetra valent) such as Si or Ge is doped with a penta valent impurity (Group V elements such as P, As or Sb), N – type semiconductor is formed. When germanium (Ge) is doped with arsenic (As), the four valence electrons of As form covalent bonds with four Ge atoms and the fifth electron of As atom is loosely bound.
  • 12. The energy required to detach the fifth loosely bound electron is only of the order of 0.045 eV for germanium. A small amount of energy provided due to thermal agitation is sufficient to detach this electron and it is ready to conduct current. The force of attraction between this mobile electron and the positively charged (+ 5) impurity ion is weakened by the dielectric constant of the medium. So, such electrons from impurity atoms will have energies slightly less than the energies of the electrons in the conduction band. Therefore, the energy state corresponding to the fifth electron is in the forbidden gap and slightly below the lower level of the conduction band. This energy level is called ‘donor level’. The impurity atom is called ‘donor’. N – type semiconductor is called ‘donor – type semiconductor’.
  • 13. When intrinsic semiconductor is doped with donor impurities, not only does the number of electrons increase, but also the number of holes decreases below that which would be available in the intrinsic semiconductor. The number of holes decreases because the larger number of electrons present causes the rate of recombination of electrons with holes to increase. Consequently, in an N-type semiconductor, free electrons are the majority charge carriers and holes are the minority charge carriers. Carrier Concentration in N - Type Semiconductors: If n and p represent the electron and hole concentrations respectively in N-type semiconductor, then n p = ni pi = ni 2 where ni and pi are the intrinsic carrier concentrations. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is proportional to n and p. Or, the rate of recombination is proportional to the product np. Since the rate of recombination is fixed at a given temperature, therefore, the product np must be a constant. When the concentration of electrons is increased above the intrinsic value by the addition of donor impurities, the concentration of holes falls below its intrinsic value, making the product np a constant, equal to ni 2.
  • 14. P - Type Semiconductors: When a semiconductor of Group IV (tetra valent) such as Si or Ge is doped with a tri valent impurity (Group III elements such as In, B or Ga), P – type semiconductor is formed. When germanium (Ge) is doped with indium (In), the three valence electrons of In form three covalent bonds with three Ge atoms. The vacancy that exists with the fourth covalent bond with fourth Ge atom constitutes a hole. Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge Ge + + In 0.05 eV Eg = 0.74 eV C.B V.B Acceptor level
  • 15. The hole which is deliberately created may be filled with an electron from neighbouring atom, creating a hole in that position from where the electron jumped. Therefore, the tri valent impurity atom is called ‘acceptor’. Since the hole is associated with a positive charge moving from one position to another, therefore, this type of semiconductor is called P – type semiconductor. The acceptor impurity produces an energy level just above the valence band. This energy level is called ‘acceptor level’. The energy difference between the acceptor energy level and the top of the valence band is much smaller than the band gap. Electrons from the valence band can, therefore, easily move into the acceptor level by being thermally agitated. P – type semiconductor is called ‘acceptor – type semiconductor’. In a P – type semiconductor, holes are the majority charge carriers and the electrons are the minority charge carriers. It can be shown that, n p = ni pi = ni 2
  • 16. Distinction between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Semiconductor: S. No. Intrinsic SC Extrinsic SC 1 Pure Group IV elements. Group III or Group V elements are introduced in Group IV elements. 2 Conductivity is only slight. Conductivity is greatly increased. 3 Conductivity increases with rise in temperature. Conductivity depends on the amount of impurity added. 4 The number of holes is always equal to the number of free electrons. In N-type, the no. of electrons is greater than that of the holes and in P-type, the no. holes is greater than that of the electrons.
  • 17. Distinction between Semiconductor and Metal: S. No. Semiconductor Metal 1 Semiconductor behaves like an insulator at 0 K. Its conductivity increases with rise in temperature. Conductivity decreases with rise in temperature. 2 Conductivity increases with rise in potential difference applied. Conductivity is an intrinsic property of a metal and is independent of applied potential difference. 3 Does not obey Ohm’s law or only partially obeys. Obeys Ohm’s law. 4 Doping the semiconductors with impurities vastly increases the conductivity. Making alloy with another metal decreases the conductivity.
  • 18. σ = e (neμe + nhμh)Or Electrical Conductivity of Semiconductors: E IeIhI = Ie + Ih Ie = neeAve Ih = nheAvh So, I = neeAve + nheAvh If the applied electric field is small, then semiconductor obeys Ohm’s law. V R = neeAve + nheAvh = eA (neve + nhvh) Or V A ρl = eA (neve + nhvh) since A ρl R = E ρ = e (neve + nhvh) since E = l V Mobility (μ) is defined as the drift velocity per unit electric field. 1 ρ = e (neμe + nhμh) Note: 1. The electron mobility is higher than the hole mobility. 2. The resistivity / conductivity depends not only on the electron and hole densities but also on their mobilities. 3. The mobility depends relatively weakly on temperature. End of S & SC - I I