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Concept of community "What is community" Concept about it

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Concept of community
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Concept of community "What is community" Concept about it

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The word "community" is derived from Latin and has been used in the English language since the 14th century. The word community is derived from the Latin communitas (meaning the same), which is in turn derived from communis, which means "common, public, shared by all or many" (encyclopedia).
A community is a small or large social unit (a group of living things) who have something in common, such as norms, religion, values, or identity. Communities often share a sense of place that is situated in a given geographical area (e.g. a country, village, town, or neighborhood) or in virtual space through communication platforms.It is a social group sharing an environment, normally with shared interests. In human communities, intent, belief, resources, preferences, needs, risks and a number of other conditions may be present and common, affecting the identity of the participants and their degree of cohesiveness. Human beings, like many other species, are essentially social beings, and naturally form communities which often develop into more structured societies.

The word "community" is derived from Latin and has been used in the English language since the 14th century. The word community is derived from the Latin communitas (meaning the same), which is in turn derived from communis, which means "common, public, shared by all or many" (encyclopedia).
A community is a small or large social unit (a group of living things) who have something in common, such as norms, religion, values, or identity. Communities often share a sense of place that is situated in a given geographical area (e.g. a country, village, town, or neighborhood) or in virtual space through communication platforms.It is a social group sharing an environment, normally with shared interests. In human communities, intent, belief, resources, preferences, needs, risks and a number of other conditions may be present and common, affecting the identity of the participants and their degree of cohesiveness. Human beings, like many other species, are essentially social beings, and naturally form communities which often develop into more structured societies.

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Concept of community "What is community" Concept about it

  1. 1. Conceptof community 1. Introduction The word "community" is derived from Latin and has been used in the English language since the 14th century. The word community is derived from the Latin communitas (meaning the same), which is in turn derived from communis, which means "common, public, shared by all or many" (encyclopedia). A community is a small or large social unit (a group of living things) who have something in common, such as norms, religion, values, or identity. Communities often share a sense of place that is situated in a given geographical area (e.g. a country, village, town, or neighborhood) or in virtual space through communication platforms.It is a social group sharing an environment, normally with shared interests. In human communities, intent, belief, resources, preferences, needs, risks and a number of other conditions may be present and common, affecting the identity of the participants and their degree of cohesiveness. Human beings, like many other species, are essentially social beings, and naturally form communities which often develop into more structured societies.
  2. 2. It can be defined by a group of people living in the same place or having a particular characteristic in common. It is a group of people who share the same things, such as: where they live, work and play. It is also a place where people solve problems together. A community could be characterized by age group, ethnicity, gender, religion, location or profession 2. Objectives The aims of the project are perused in this paper are listed below:  To know the concept of community, ethnic community, occupational community and higher and lower community.  To know the role of community in Disaster Management.  To gather knowledge about The significance of ethnic community in Disaster Management 3. Materials and Methodology Methodology is one of the most important parts of any investigation. It means the way or manner by which the study is accomplished, which refers to the full outcome of the process at a glance. A proper methodology is always necessary for any paper, which helps to organize experiences, observations, examinations, analysis of data and information and their logical expression in a systematic process to achieve the ultimate goals and objectives of the paper. This paper is made up by collecting secondary data. Data has been collected from various journal, scientific magazines, books and websites. The whole process is shown below in a flow chart. Secondary Data Collection From Different Sources Secondary Data Input
  3. 3. Secondary Data Processing and Analysis Final Output Fig-1: Methodology Chart. 4. Types of community A number of ways to categorize types of community have been proposed. One such breakdown is as follows: 1. Location-based Communities: range from the local neighborhood, suburb, village, town or city, region, nation or even the planet as a whole. These are also called communities of place. 2. Identity-based Communities: range from the local clique, sub-culture, ethnic group, religious, multicultural or pluralistic civilization, or the global community cultures of today. They may be included as communities of need or identity, such as disabled persons or elderly people. 3. Organizationally based Communities: range from communities organized informally around family or network-based guilds and associations to more formal incorporated associations, political decision making structures, economic enterprises, or professional associations at a small, national or international scale. Communities are nested; one community can contain another—for example a geographic community may contain a number of ethnic communities. 5. Why we need community in disastermanagement Role of community in disaster management is very important. They are given below:
  4. 4.  As it is the community which is going to face the disaster, it is very important that community should be part of the complete disaster management process in all three phases- pre, during, post.  Community knows itself, its environment better. Many times, senior citizens are aware of incidences that have happened in the past, which others may not be aware of. One just needs to make community aware, and provide necessary inputs to identify hazards and risks.  When community is involved in DM planning process, it does not become responsibility of only govt, or any external agency. Community accepts it as their own responsibility and this feeling in community makes the process, response easier.  Also in case of any disaster, community itself acts as a first responder before the external help reaches to victims. So if the capacity building of community is done, community will be ready to face disaster and it will reduce the work load on external agencies coming to help.  Community’s role can be in all three phases- training, plan, early warning, communication, shelter, search and rescue, food arrangements etc. can be planned better with help of youths, women etc from the community. 6. Ethnic Community The term ethnic is derived from the Greek word “ethnos” (more precisely, from the adjective “ethnikos”). An ethnic group is a distinct category of the population in a larger society whose culture is usually different from its own. The members of such a group are, or feel themselves, or are thought to be, bound together by common ties of race or nationality or culture. An ethnic community, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as
  5. 5. common ancestry, language, society, Culture or nation. Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic community tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art, and physical appearance. Some common bonds that unify ethnic community include: Language, religion, folkways and mores, styles of dress, foods, occupational specialization, social values, and aesthetic standards. 6.1 The significance of ethnic community in DisasterManagement Ethnic community can give us some opportunity in Disaster Management. Ethnic community can consider the behaviors of communities and individuals when subjecting to disastrous situations along with the underline cultural aspects of them. The significance of ethnic community in Disaster Management are given below: With the help of ethnic community we can know their language, culture and other activities which helps in Disaster Management.  Language: language helps to express ideas and enables communication with others which is effective in Disaster Management.  Values: Values help us to evaluate people, objects and event in Disaster Management.
  6. 6. Their adaptation power in the phase of disaster is different from other community. By knowing their adaption measure we can improve our survival power in disastrous event. By the generation to generation, they follow their indigenous knowledge for disaster management. They can guess the impact of disaster by their indigenous knowledge and take the measure for reducing the damage of property and life. For example, the Moken community in Thailand identified the signs such as unusual behavior of animals, birds and low tide as indications for a Tsunami from their traditional stories. Thus this community moved away from the sea towards protective areas (Arunotai, 2008). Due to the generational transformation of cultural components such as knowledge, beliefs, values and norms, society’s values are preserved for the future that provide guidance to survive in Disaster Management 7. OccupationalCommunity Occupational communities represent bounded work cultures populated by people who share similar identities and values that transcendent specific organizational settings. An occupational community as a group of people who consider themselves to be engaged in the same sort of work, whose identity is drawn from their work; who share with one another a set of values, norms, and perspectives that apply but extend beyond work related matters, and whose social relationships meld work and leisure. Occupational communities create and sustain relatively unique work cultures consisting of, among other things, task rituals, standards for proper and improper behavior, work codes surrounding relatively routine practices, and compelling accounts attesting to the logic and value of these rituals, standards, and codes. They suggest that the quest for occupational self-control provides the special motive for the development of occupational communities.
  7. 7. 8. Higher and lower community The higher class community is often made up of highly educated business and professional people with high incomes, such as doctors, lawyers, stockbrokers, and CEOs. They live in exclusive neighborhoods, gather at expensive social clubs, and send their children to the finest schools. As might be expected, they also exercise a great deal of influence and power both nationally and globally. The lower class community is typified by poverty, homelessness, and unemployment. People of this class, few of whom have finished high school, suffer from lack of medical care, adequate housing and food, decent clothing, safety, and vocational training. The media often stigmatize the lower class as “the underclass,” inaccurately characterizing poor people as welfare mothers who abuse the system by having more and more babies, welfare fathers who are able to work but do not, drug abusers, criminals, and societal “trash.” 9. Conclusion Community members play a vital role in reducing the impact of a disaster. People at this level are often the most vulnerable to disaster and experience the greatest impacts for various reasons. Yet they are not passive victims. With knowledge of the local geology, the hazard context, and the livelihoods options available, local communities must be involved in disaster management programmes from the start, and supported by projects to develop the capacities and linkages that help overcome.
  8. 8. References Arunotai, N., 2008, ‘Saved by an old legend and a keen observation: The case of Moken sea nomads in Thailand’, in R. Shaw, N. Uy, & J. Baumwoll (eds.), Indigenous knowledge for disaster risk reduction: Good practices and lessons learnt from the Asia-Pacific region, pp. 73-78, UNISDR Asia and Pacific, Bangkok.

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