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Content strategy and content marketing

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Content strategy and content marketing

  1. 1. Content Strategy and Content Marketing Some high level thoughts and best practices
  2. 2. BRAND DIGITAL CONTENT
  3. 3. CONTENT
  4. 4. What is content strategy?
  5. 5. What is content marketing strategy?
  6. 6. What is content?
  7. 7. How do you do it?
  8. 8. Planning for the creation, delivery, and governance of useful, usable content CONTENT STRATEGY A process for distributing content to attract, acquire, and engage a clearly defined audience – with the objective of driving profitable action CONTENT MARKETING THE NEW MARKETING CURRENCY
  9. 9. It’s about the farmer. Not the tractor.
  10. 10. NOISE!
  11. 11. Consumer Emotional Needs Rational Needs Products/Services Your Brand
  12. 12. What are their questions, problems, frustrations, goals, beliefs and interests? How can we help them? Two questions:
  13. 13. Those that do are 60% more effective. Only 39% of companies have done this. Source: Content Marketing Institute Do you have a documented content strategy?
  14. 14. A STRATEGY FRAMEWORK
  15. 15. Know your AUDIENCE
  16. 16. AUDIENCE An inconvenient truth: They don’t care about you. They care about themselves. Their questions, problems, frustrations, goals, beliefs and interests
  17. 17. “Business buyers don’t ‘buy’ your product. They ‘buy into’ your approach to solving their problem. - Jeff Ernst, Forrester
  18. 18. “Ninety percent of all corporate websites talk about how great the company or product is and forget about the customer.” - Joe Pulizzi
  19. 19. AUDIENCE
  20. 20. AUDIENCE
  21. 21. Who is your most important audience?
  22. 22. A U T O M A T E D L I C E N S E P L A T E R E A D E R U S E R GOALS VALUES AND BELIEFS FRUSTRATIONS STATS EDUCATION: Criminal justice, law enforcement, four-year degrees becoming increasingly common JOB TITLES: Police officer, patrol officer, deputy, highway patrolman, traffic enforcement task force MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES: Patrolling, responding to calls, writing tickets, making arrests, paperwork, “catching the bad guys” EXPERIENCE: 3-10 years DIMENSIONS EASE-OF-USE COST / BENEFIT CONTACT SUPERVISING W/CRIMINALS PROGRAM STREET SMART POLITICALLY AWARE OFFICER MARK O’BRIEN “ALPR is a great tool that helps me do my job better — keeping guns, narcotics and fugitives off the street.” Mark O’Brien always wanted to be a police officer, to keep his friends and neighbors safe and get criminals off the street. He spends the majority of his 12-hour shifts in the car patrolling and responding to calls, which is physically and mentally demanding. Not every day is bad, but seeing the worst of people is draining. Today he stopped a number of vehicles for traffic violations, secured the scene at a fire, and at the end of his shift, arrested a drunk driver, which required an extra three hours of processing and paperwork at the jail. Officer O’Brien learned about ALPR from Sergeant Rodriguez, who saw its effectiveness at a vendor demo at the IACP conference. Rodriguez applied for and received a grant for the department’s first ALPR system, but has since moved on to manage another agency’s ALPR program. Officer O’Brien has been piloting the system, working with the vendor rep to learn the software and optimize the camera for accuracy. He’s used the system to recover stolen vehicles, serve warrants and tie a specific vehicle to a series of armed robberies over a three-month period — a connection that wouldn’t have been possible without ALPR. Officer O’Brien advocates for ALPR to his fellow officers — he reads exponentially more plates per shift and makes more arrests as a result — but hasn’t made any headway in securing additional systems. He’s researched the technology online and believes new products are faster and more accurate, but hasn’t seen them in action. Leadership acknowledges ALPR successes, but is concerned with negative sentiment around data privacy, and of course, the purchase price is hard to prioritize when there are budget cuts every year. Officer O’Brien has thought about applying for another grant, but it’s a time consuming process and he doesn’t know where to start. • Catch bad guys • Protect myself, my partners and the community • Be as efficient as possible — do more with less • Rise through the ranks and avoid making a mistake by following protocol at all times • Demonstrate the effectiveness and value of ALPR to my superiors and the public • I want to do the right thing, even in complicated, stressful and dangerous situations • Law enforcement is a respectable career path that allows me to have a positive impact on the community — I take the responsibility very seriously • I appreciate straight, honest communication and practical solutions, not marketing or technical jargon • ALPR is a great technology that helps me be more efficient and effective on the street — it’s like an extra set of eyes • My life is in danger every day — I need to be focused, follow protocol and trust my fellow officers • I have a lot of equipment systems to learn and use, and I’m not terribly tech savvy — everything needs to be reliable and simple • Public and political scrutiny about everything we do, including ALPR — it helps us protect people, not spy on them! • If decision makers understood ALPR and the help it provides in solving all kinds of cases, they’d be more supportive • No budget for ALPR, lack of influence, long purchase process I D E N T I T Y M A N A G E M E N T U S E R GOALS VALUES AND BELIEFS FRUSTRATIONS STATS EDUCATION: Criminal justice, law enforcement, criminology, forensic science, chemistry, biology JOB TITLES: Crime scene investigator, detective, forensic examiner, forensic investigator MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES: Processing crime scenes, collecting fingerprints, DNA and other evidence EXPERIENCE: 2-8 years DIMENSIONS EASE-OF-USE COST / BENEFIT CONTACT TECH W/CRIMINALS SAVVY STREET SMART POLITICALLY AWARE CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATOR JACOBS “Nothing beats a fingerprint for identifying a suspect. Who do these belong to?” As a crime scene investigator, Jacobs does not spend his days interviewing witnesses or chasing suspects down dark alleys. He views himself as more of a scientist than superhero. The bulk of his 12-hour shifts are spent processing crime scenes, often in the middle of the night, back at the lab or writing reports at his desk. Jacobs is called on to collect and catalog evidence as efficiently as possible — but he must also be thorough (peoples lives depend on it). He collaborates with detectives and other officers to identify potential suspects. He also coordinates with various specialists at the lab, analyzing evidence and preparing reports for use in trial. The concept isn’t new, but fingerprint technology has come a long way in terms of speed, accuracy and integration with national databases. When you need to identify a suspect, there’s nothing as absolute as a fingerprint. Jacobs and his teammates are energized by finding clues in partial prints that then lead to identifying suspects. Today’s equipment needs to be accurate and fast (proven by independent test results), scalable, automated and flexible — able to integrate seamlessly with current and future databases. Jacobs is not a decision maker, but he certainly has influence with his superiors, is not afraid to advocate for what he believes will help, and is likely to be promoted to a role with more authority soon. He’s passionate about his craft and the technology that helps him be more effective. Whenever possible, he collaborates with coworkers and counterparts across the country, both online and at conventions, discussing new technology and how it can be used to solve more crimes, faster, and with fewer errors. Jailers, Corrections Officers: Value usability and effectiveness above all. In direct physical contact with violent criminals — no time for issues with equipment, procedures or politics. IM products empower them to verify identity and process inmates as quickly and safely as possible. Not tech savvy. Patrol Officers: See the ALPR User profile for more info. Value usability and effectiveness above all. IM products empower them to identify suspects quickly and accurately, keeping officers safe and putting the right criminals in jail. Not tech savvy. • Identify the correct suspect, ensuring accuracy, eliminating errors and solving crimes • Gather the evidence and documentation needed for effective trial • Speed up the process, reduce wait time, solve crimes faster • Increase professional knowledge and skill, building a strong reputation • I enjoy collaborating with teammates to solve the puzzle — the thrill of the hunt • I take pride in ensuring the right suspects are convicted, keeping community safe • Equipment and database must be accurate, fast and easy to use, even with partial prints or imperfect images • Naturally curious and potentially engaged with tech — much improved over messy ink and mailing it in • Stressful, increasing on-call and overtime demands, which can contribute to errors • Software or equipment usability issues that reduce productivity — often exacerbated by inconsistent training and user inputs • Hardware and software dictated by the state (approved vendor lists, database compatibility) • The “CSI Effect” — everyone expects complex crimes to be solved in an hour A G E N C Y L E A D E R GOALS VALUES AND BELIEFS FRUSTRATIONS STATS JOB TITLES: Chief of police, sheriff, director, administrator, commissioner MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES: Leading a team; managing the budget; making decisions around policy, personnel and equipment; addressing the concerns of relevant elected officials EXPERIENCE: 20+ years DIMENSIONS EASE-OF-USE COST / BENEFIT CONTACT SUPERVISING W/CRIMINALS PROGRAM STREET SMART POLITICALLY AWARE CHIEF JOHNSON “I’m an advocate for the department, the community and the city council, depending on the conversation.” After 26 years on the force, Greg Johnson was appointed the next chief of police. The path here has been tough, but no previous role compares to the immense responsibility of being “chief.” It’s been awhile since he’s made an arrest. As chief, he may spend the entire day in meetings with elected officials, community groups, members of the media and fellow law enforcement leaders. Of course he also spends time out in the community, participating in associations like IACP, sharing advice with other chiefs and providing active leadership on high-profile cases. Being chief is a juggling act — making hard calls to balance the budget, keeping elected officials happy and giving his people the tools they need to be safe and successful. Sometimes he feels as much a politician as a policeman. To be an effective leader, he uses his past experience, recalling his days out on the streets, though he doesn’t spend as much time there as he used to. Today he needs trusted lieutenants, captains and program managers to help keep him up to speed on challenges and opportunities regarding personnel, policy and equipment. He leans heavily on these trusted teammates when it comes to making big decisions and investments. They often do the research to help him to understand the options, make the best decision and justify or seek approval from the city council. He trusts those recommendations and champions them through all of the budgetary gatekeepers in order to provide the tools his agency needs to do its job well. Sheriff: The Sheriff is an elected official and therefore very politically motivated, but still likely a long-term law enforcement veteran, sharing many concerns and motivations with the Chief. His jurisdiction is county based-rather than city; what this means in practice varies wildly based on county (urban vs. rural, etc.). Jail Administrator: The Jail Administrator has been promoted up through the corrections system. He is very busy with the everyday workings of the jail, including managing dangerous situations. He’s tough and doesn’t tolerate any BS. He feels under-appreciated and as an afterthought when it comes to technology and tools intended for use in jails. He answers to the parole board. Forensics Director: The Forensic Director is well educated in criminology and is tech savvy, always wishing for better tools for his team. He manages investigators, but still likes to help on cases. His deep knowledge base and use of facts and data helps convince elected officials about the importance of technology. • Empower officers to be effective and safe • Lower crime rates in the community • Do the most good with the available budget • Keep everyone happy to protect my career — department, public and elected officials • It’s my responsibility to advocate for my people and promote department wins, but also discipline when needed — I set the tone • I want to stay true to my “boots-on-the-ground” roots — nostalgia for my street cop days • I’m an experiential learner, most comfortable with traditional police work but open to technology that helps meet our objectives • Above all, I’m a public servant and believe that quality police work makes the community a better place • Juggling the concerns the department, public and elected officials — compromise • Making hard decisions about what gets cut from the budget • Bureaucracy, politics and slow processes in the way of doing what I believe is right • Staying on top of trends in policy, processes and technology necessary for true leadership • The anxiety and risk of any potential scandal or bad PR P R O G R A M M A N A G E R GOALS VALUES AND BELIEFS FRUSTRATIONS STATS JOB TITLES: Program manager, sergeant, lieutenant MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES: Managing team and budget, managing up to leadership, researching equipment and vendors, troubleshooting issues EXPERIENCE: 6-20 years DIMENSIONS EASE-OF-USE COST / BENEFIT CONTACT SUPERVISING W/CRIMINALS PROGRAM STREET SMART POLITICALLY AWARE MATT JONES, PROGRAM MANAGER “If my people have everything they need to do their jobs, I’ve done mine.” Matt made program manager because he’s driven, capable and efficient. He has field experience with technology and is knowledgeable about the benefits. He still feels most comfortable working alongside his teammates, but now they look to him for leadership when it comes to troubleshooting issues with equipment, processes and agency policy. He’s becoming more comfortable meeting with leadership to discuss project progress, successes and ongoing needs. Soon the confidence he feels in the field will extend into those conversations. He’s learning to choose his battles. Matt is under constant pressure to get more out of the team. In the field, they need several new technology tools to work reliably, efficiently and effectively. Any downtime slows the team to a screeching halt. When there are issues, Matt has the trusted account manager and customer service rep on speed-dial. He leverages online troubleshooting info, as well as advice he receives from other program managers around the country. He knows better technology and service are expensive, but prioritizes effectiveness and ease-of-use to make his life, and the lives of his teammates, easier. As part of his role, Matt is responsible for improving program effectiveness and efficiency. He makes changes where he can, makes proactive suggestions to leadership when appropriate, and at times is tasked by leadership to research and recommend new technology and policies. He does most of his research by contacting his counterparts in other agencies, searching online, talking to vendors and attending conferences. He wishes he made the decisions, but he’s excited to see his recommendations followed, when he can prove the ROI. • Make sure the people on my team have what they need to be safe and effective • Increase overall program performance and efficiency in the field • Promote program achievements so my team and I look good to our superiors • Keep the program budget balanced • I’m passionate about my program — it’s a tremendous asset to the agency and the community • Hard work got me here, but it’ll take more than hard work to make it to the next level • I will always advocate for my team and do whatever I can to make sure they have the best equipment and training available • I’m also learning to focus on the larger picture — new equipment and personnel are expensive, so I have to be sure the ROI is solid before I sell it up to leadership • I see my team’s frustrations first hand, but have limited power to fix issues on my own • We could be more effective with better technology tools, but getting it approved takes too much time and energy • I need leadership to advocate more for me and my team — I wish I had more face time with them and public officials to make our case • Lack of time and conference-travel budget to learn about new practices and technologies E L E C T R O N I C M O N I T O R I N G U S E R GOALS VALUES AND BELIEFS FRUSTRATIONS STATS EDUCATION: Sociology, psychology, social work, criminal justice JOB TITLES: Parole officer, probation officer MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES: Setting up equipment, monitoring offenders, interacting with offenders, reporting violations EXPERIENCE: 1-10 years DIMENSIONS EASE-OF-USE COST / BENEFIT CONTACT MANAGING W/CRIMINALS PROGRAM STREET SMART POLITICALLY AWARE KAREN THOMPSON, PAROLE OFFICER “People deserve a second chance — but not at the expense of safety.” Karen has a unique balance of toughness and compassion. Every day she works directly with people who’ve been convicted of crimes or are awaiting trial. She feels the weight of responsibility for the safety of victims and the community, and also for the offenders she works to rehabilitate. Her days are busy and her phone rings day and night, particularly when offenders aren’t where they’re supposed to be. She works hard under the belief that electronic monitoring is better for the community because, unlike incarceration, it saves money, It is also better for the offender because it enables them to reintegrate into a productive life. But ultimately, offenders are responsible for their own actions. Karen is responsible for 50-120 cases, leaving no time for equipment issues — it’s there to help her do her job. She’s not particularly tech savvy or mechanically inclined, so she needs the software to be easy to use and the bracelets easy to put on. If she has an issue, she needs 24/7 support. False alarms in the middle of the night due to satellite changes, bad cell signals and dead batteries are infuriating because it’s her phone that rings. Knowing she’s responsible for so many offenders in the community causes anxiety, but her strong belief in the value of reintegration keeps her going. Karen was not involved with the purchase of the current EM products, but she shares her thoughts, positive and especially negative, with her colleagues and superiors. She’d like to have more influence but doesn’t know how. When Karen has time to research EM equipment, which isn’t often, she asks colleagues, searches online or attends vendor presentations. She’d like to go to industry events, but the budget just isn’t there. She knows having the right equipment, policies and people in place are the only way to be successful. • Keep victims and the community safe • Make sure dozens of offenders are where they’re supposed to be • Avoid any crime perpetrated by offenders in her program • Help reform low-risk and juvenile offenders who want to help themselves • Cope with stress and anxiety – this job is 24/7/365 and feels thankless at times • An effective EM program is a tremendous asset to the community — it saves money and helps rehabilitate offenders • Rehabilitation is a worthwhile endeavor — juveniles and low-risk offenders benefit from being home/in community vs. being in prison • No amount of monitoring will help offenders who don’t want to change • EM technology is a powerful tool that helps me do my job • Overwhelming caseload — often 100 cases or more • Calls in the middle of the night and signal issues due to equip- ment limitations and imperfections • Bad publicity, misconceptions and a lack of communication/ influence, especially with judges and city council, about how EM can/should work, how it can help • Lack of budget for education and conferences • Current EM products aren’t perfect — lost signals, GPS satellite changes, dated software, short battery life, little communication with wearer, difficult installation
  23. 23. Know your AUDIENCE Develop a KILLER POV
  24. 24. AUDIENCE POV Brand Strategy: Define your purpose, and discover your story Once this is done it becomes pretty clear what you need to do.
  25. 25. “People don’t buy what you do. They buy why you do it.” - Simon Sinek
  26. 26. Chipotle ‘Cultivating Thought’ video: https://youtu.be/QVcoo6rxAXA
  27. 27. AUDIENCE POV
  28. 28. Know your AUDIENCE Develop a KILLER POV The convergence of your audience needs, and your killer POV, is fertile ground for great content that will motivate your audience into valuable action.
  29. 29. Know your AUDIENCE Develop a KILLER POV The right CONTENT MIX
  30. 30. AUDIENCE POV CONTENT MIX The purpose of content: Move them through their journey by being helpful No one wants to read your brochure
  31. 31. “It’s no longer about brand first. It’s about giving consumers content that adds value to their lives.” - David Beebe, Marriott
  32. 32. Content Personas PROMOTER Advertises and explains your products and services. Answers specific questions about features and benefits. Persuades customers to make purchase decisions. ADVOCATE Enhances discovery and awareness. Champions a larger idea in a way that inspires people to engage. Elevates a category by attracting followers. TEACHER Positions the brand as a thought leader. Builds trust that our expertise is valuable. Educates an audience in a way that is truly useful and not focused on selling. STORYTELLER Connects with an audience in an emotional way. Illuminates shared feelings and beliefs. Focuses on changing a belief about a particular thing. RATIONALEMOTIVE PURCHASEAWARENESS
  33. 33. TEACHER PROMOTER STORYTELLER ADVOCATE PURPOSE TOPICS FORMATS/PRODUCTION DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL INFORMATION SOURCES WORKFLOW/BUDGET Customer Support User guides, FAQs, Tips/Tricks, troubleshooting, product bulletins, Ask An Expert Best Practices Advice on best practices from 3M SMEs for leveraging technology to prevent and solve crimes Grant Writing Support Forms and instructions for seeking and securing financial assistance from government bodies Marketing Materials Product brochures, demos, presentations, etc. that promotes products and is used to directly sell Promotions Announcements on new and upgraded products, advertising, launch campaigns, etc. ROI Calculators Tools to enable customers and prospects to build a business case for investing in our technology Quick Wins Emotionally fueled stories showcasing a specific crime that was prevented/solved using our products Success Stories Stories of LE&C agencies who have transformed their organizations using our technology Case Studies In depth stories on LE&C agencies who have transformed their organizations using our technology 3M LE&C eNewsletter Email newsletter that packages our content and distributes to subscribers — includes all content types Category News Curation Sharing relevant industry news, preferably including a 3M POV - need not include any 3M product mention Written Articles - Electronic/Print Written Articles - Electronic/Print Written Instructions - Electronic Forms/Templates - Electronic Infographics - Electronic, Video Sales Collateral - Electronic/Print Various Interactive tools - Electronic Interactive Demos - Electronic Articles with Photos - Electronic Video Written Articles - Electronic/Print HTML Email Written (republished) Articles - Electronic 3M Reps, Website, eNewsletter, Events 3M Reps, Website, eNewsletter, Social Media, Events, PR Pitches Website, 3M Reps, Events 3M Reps, Website, Sales App, Social Media, Events Various 3M Reps, Sales App, Website, Events Website, Social Media, eNewsletter 3M Reps, Website, Social Media, eNewsletter, Events, PR Pitches Website, Social Media, eNewsletter, Sales Reps, PR Pitches Email Website, Social Media Key Opinion Leader Articles Outside perspectives on policy and best practices for leveraging technology to prevent and solve crimes Written Articles - Electronic/Print 3M Reps, Website, eNewsletter, Events First Responder Grants First Responder Grants, 3M Mkt Coordinates User Group Online and/or real-life forum for users and potential users to share their experiences 3M Science. Applied to life. Content sharing how 3M science contributes to the effectiveness of our products, from 101 to advanced 3M Reps, Website, eNewsletter, Events 3M Reps, Website, eNewsletter, Social Media, Events, PR Pitches Online Forum, Events Video, Articles with Photos 3M Engineers, Account Reps 3M Engineers, Account Reps, SMEs Customers, SMEs 3M Engineers, SMEs 3M Marketers, SMEs 3M Marketers, SMEs 3M Marketers, SMEs 3M Marketers, Reps, Customers, Local News Outlets 3M Marketers, Reps, Customers 3M Marketers, Reps, Customers Key Opinion Leaders Local and Industry News Outlets Any/All Content Created Above 3M Mkt to Vet Topics, MK to Support 3M Mkt Coordinate, MK to Support 3M SMEs to Lead, 3M Mkt to Support 3M Mkt/MK to Vet Topics, Develop 3M Mkt to Gather Stories, Share 3M Mkt to Gather Stories, Share 3M Mkt to Gather Stories, MK to Develop MK to Develop Based on Success Story Videos 3M Mkt/MK to Curate Content, MK to Develop 3M Mkt/SMEs to Coordinate, MK to Support 3M Mkt/MK to Develop 3M Mkt to Develop, MK to Support 3M Mkt to Develop, MK to Support
  34. 34. LAW ENFORCEMENT & CORRECTIONS CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MAP CUSTOMEREXPERIENCE OPPORTUNITIESQUESTIONS/NEEDSMINDSETS CUSTOMERPERSPECTIVES CONFIDENT PURCHASE DECISIONSEMPOWERING INFLUENCESATISFACTION / PREFERENCE / LOYALTYESTABLISHING TRUST / PARTNERSHIPPRIMARY 3M GOAL Worst Case: “I’m overwhelmed. There’s a lot of information to absorb. I’m expected to use a lot of equipment to do my job everyday, but I’m not very tech savvy.” Best Case: “It’s exciting to get a new piece of technology because it’ll help us be more effective, more efficient and make our jobs easier. The trainers from 3M were great. I look forward to working with them.” Worst Case: “This product works okay, but I wish there were fewer issues. It’s also lacking in a few important areas. I guess this is what we have so I’ll keep using it until someone tells me otherwise.” Best Case: “Our 3M rep really helped us get up to speed on the technology and optimize our setup. If I have another issue, I know where to find a solution. I’d definitely recommend 3M.” Worst Case: “I’m looking for equipment and policy upgrades that help my team, but I also need to sell these recommendations upstream to my superiors. I’m ambitious about my advancing career, and I need to stay on top of new technology and best practices.” Best Case: “The Chief asked me for a recommendation — and I feel great about recommending 3M. They had all the information I could want right on the website: case studies, an ROI calculator, even best practices. They understand the challenges we face.” Worst Case: “I need to make the best decisions for my agency and the community. I’m in a high-profile position now, and my decisions are important. I need to have a lot of confidence that the tools we use are working and that we’re managing our budget responsibly.” Best Case: “My program manager recommended we upgrade to a new 3M system. He had great examples of agencies like ours improving their results and ROI. I feel confident in requesting the needed budget from the council.” • How does all this equipment work? Just give me the basics. • How does it help me do my job? Keep me safe? Make me more efficient? Effective? • Do you have real stories of how it’s worked in a department like mine? • Where do I turn when I have a question? An issue? • I’m the resident expert on this technology, and I need to teach other people how to use it and answer their questions. What training tools do you have? Who can I call when I need help? • Are we getting as much as we can out of these tools? • Is anyone else doing it better, and can we learn from them? • How can I solve this issue? • Who do I turn to for help? • What type of support is included with our system? • Am I getting all the performance out of this technology? Is it set up correctly? Integrated correctly with our systems? • Are our internal processes aligned with best practices? • Are there updates or upgrades available? • Is our policy the best it could be for this system? • What can I learn from my program manager, teammates, peers? • Are there other 3M products and tech we should consider? • I have feedback and ideas... where do I submit them? • How do I pay for this? Are there grants available? • How much would a system for my agency cost? • What should I recommend to my boss? • What info would be more persuasive for him/her? • Can I prove the ROI? • Would anyone come give us a demo? • What vendors should I consider? Who has the best system? • How can this technology be used most effectively? What should our policy be? • Have other agencies like mine implemented this technology? How did it go? • Where do I find this information? Is it readily available? • Is there a technology to help my agency respond to this community-safety need? • How can I determine the right technology for my situation? • Is this a good investment? Does it fit into my budget? • Will it help my agency and the community? • Which vendors should I trust? Are they in it for the long haul? • How should we choose a technology/system? • Have other leaders in other cities made this decision? • Do I have information I need to defend it to other leaders? • Are there political implications to consider? • What policy works for my agency and community? • Is the info I need to make a decision readily available? Where can I find it? • Focus on how it works and how it helps them, in addition to the “features & technology” during training • Site visits and training sessions to demonstrate how the products work and be sure they’re set up correctly • Leave behind training material: quick reference guide, FAQs, troubleshooting guide • Provide tech/customer support contact information • Train-the-trainer session(s) and dedicated support contact(s) for the program manager • Invite the program manager to join a select group of 3M ambassadors • Take the opportunity to introduce the team (at a high level) to 3M LE&C portfolio and activities within LE&C • Set a schedule for follow-up visits to fix any issues, answer questions, train new hires, introduce product updates, etc. • Customer/technical support protocols and contacts • Troubleshooting guide, FAQ • Ask an expert and user forums on the LE&C website — build up knowledge base (helpful answers) to cut down on calls, questions • Product user and setup guide — printed, video and/or app • Best practices and policy guides (individual and agency levels) • User groups at events and online • Constantly gather feedback to improve products, service and marketing • Some of the opportunities in the research and training columns will reinforce partnership for users, too • ROI calculators • Grant education, writing support • Success stories (technology and/or policy highlights, not sales) • Case studies (3M LE&C focused) and Testimonials for 3M • Recommended best practices (created by 3M or trusted partner organization) • 3rd-party testing data • Product literature and data sheets, demonstrations, trial periods, demo videos • 3M LE&C landing page • SEM and SEO • Event sponsorship and SME presentations • Content sharing with priority organizations and media outlets • Strong presence at relevant leadership events • Clear POV on policy recommendations and political issues, aligning with partner organizations • Media relations and content sharing with partner organizations and media outlets • New product, technology and service offerings to help demonstrate continued investment in LE&C • RFP responses • Finalist product demos • Sales presentations • Sales app (tablet/mobile) • Most of the opportunities in the research column are relevant in the buying phase, too CONSTANT OPTIMIZATION: • Seek more efficient procedures • Data/system integration EQUIPMENT ISSUES: • Known/unknown problems surface • Troubleshooting PRODUCT UPDATES: • Software enhancements • Product changes • Product upgrades and expansions SHARING EXPERIENCES: • Conversations with peers, supervisors • Social media connections • Network at conferences RESEARCHING PRODUCTS: • Explore new technologies and best practices • Establish and review technology guidelines • Prepare recommendations for leadership PROGRAM OPTIMIZATION: • Look for technology and process improvements • Search for case studies, best practices • Report ongoing metrics ATTENDING CONFERENCES: • Stay up to speed • Connect with the LE&C community PROGRAM BUDGET PLANNING: • Balance priorities • Verify and demonstrate ROI RFP PROCESS: • Determine which vendors to invite • Write/send RFP to select vendors • Review proposals • Meet with finalist vendors, demo products JUSTIFYING BUDGET: • Receive requests and recommendations • Determine ROI and priorities • Present budget request/rationale as needed UNDERSTANDING TECHNOLOGY: • Request recommendations from program managers • Map technology to agency goals • Discuss political implications DETERMINING NEEDS/PRIORITIES: • Assess current situation vs. goals • Collaborate with colleagues NEW SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION: • 3M agency visit • Group training and demonstration • Ongoing support protocol established NEW USER HIRED: • Trained by program manager • Training materials shared • Ongoing support protocol established TRAIN THE TRAINER: • 3M site visit and deep dive • Partnership with 3M established • Training support and tools delivered • Recruit as influencers TRAINING USING RESEARCHING BUYING USERS LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MANAGERS
  35. 35. LAW ENFORCEMENT & CORRECTIONS CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MAP STIONS/NEEDSMINDSETS CONFIDENT PURCHASE DECISIONSEMPOWERING INFLUENCESATISFACTION / PREFERENCE / LOYALTYESTABLISHING TRUST / PARTNERSHIPY L Worst Case: “I’m overwhelmed. There’s a lot of information to absorb. I’m expected to use a lot of equipment to do my job everyday, but I’m not very tech savvy.” Best Case: “It’s exciting to get a new piece of technology because it’ll help us be more effective, more efficient and make our jobs easier. The trainers from 3M were great. I look forward to working with them.” Worst Case: “This product works okay, but I wish there were fewer issues. It’s also lacking in a few important areas. I guess this is what we have so I’ll keep using it until someone tells me otherwise.” Best Case: “Our 3M rep really helped us get up to speed on the technology and optimize our setup. If I have another issue, I know where to find a solution. I’d definitely recommend 3M.” Worst Case: “I’m looking for equipment and policy upgrades that help my team, but I also need to sell these recommendations upstream to my superiors. I’m ambitious about my advancing career, and I need to stay on top of new technology and best practices.” Best Case: “The Chief asked me for a recommendation — and I feel great about recommending 3M. They had all the information I could want right on the website: case studies, an ROI calculator, even best practices. They understand the challenges we face.” Worst Case: “I need to make the best decisions for my agency and the community. I’m in a high-profile position now, and my decisions are important. I need to have a lot of confidence that the tools we use are working and that we’re managing our budget responsibly.” Best Case: “My program manager recommended we upgrade to a new 3M system. He had great examples of agencies like ours improving their results and ROI. I feel confident in requesting the needed budget from the council.” • How does all this equipment work? Just give me the basics. • How does it help me do my job? Keep me safe? Make me more efficient? Effective? • Do you have real stories of how it’s worked in a department like mine? • Where do I turn when I have a question? An issue? • I’m the resident expert on this technology, and I need to teach other people how to use it and answer their questions. What training tools do you have? Who can I call when I need help? • How can I solve this issue? • Who do I turn to for help? • What type of support is included with our system? • Am I getting all the performance out of this technology? Is it set up correctly? Integrated correctly with our systems? • Are our internal processes aligned with best practices? • Are there updates or upgrades available? • How do I pay for this? Are there grants available? • How much would a system for my agency cost? • What should I recommend to my boss? • What info would be more persuasive for him/her? • Can I prove the ROI? • Would anyone come give us a demo? • What vendors should I consider? Who has the best system? • Is there a technology to help my agency respond to this community-safety need? • How can I determine the right technology for my situation? • Is this a good investment? Does it fit into my budget? • Will it help my agency and the community? • Which vendors should I trust? Are they in it for the long haul? • How should we choose a technology/system? • Have other leaders in other cities made this decision? CONSTANT OPTIMIZATION: • Seek more efficient procedures • Data/system integration EQUIPMENT ISSUES: • Known/unknown problems surface • Troubleshooting PRODUCT UPDATES: • Software enhancements • Product changes • Product upgrades and expansions SHARING EXPERIENCES: • Conversations with peers, supervisors • Social media connections • Network at conferences RESEARCHING PRODUCTS: • Explore new technologies and best practices • Establish and review technology guidelines • Prepare recommendations for leadership PROGRAM OPTIMIZATION: • Look for technology and process improvements • Search for case studies, best practices • Report ongoing metrics ATTENDING CONFERENCES: • Stay up to speed • Connect with the LE&C community PROGRAM BUDGET PLANNING: • Balance priorities • Verify and demonstrate ROI RFP PROCESS: • Determine which vendors to invite • Write/send RFP to select vendors • Review proposals • Meet with finalist vendors, demo products JUSTIFYING BUDGET: • Receive requests and recommendations • Determine ROI and priorities • Present budget request/rationale as needed UNDERSTANDING TECHNOLOGY: • Request recommendations from program managers • Map technology to agency goals • Discuss political implications DETERMINING NEEDS/PRIORITIES: • Assess current situation vs. goals • Collaborate with colleagues NEW SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION: • 3M agency visit • Group training and demonstration • Ongoing support protocol established NEW USER HIRED: • Trained by program manager • Training materials shared • Ongoing support protocol established TRAIN THE TRAINER: • 3M site visit and deep dive • Partnership with 3M established • Training support and tools delivered • Recruit as influencers TRAINING USING RESEARCHING BUYING USERS LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MANAGERS
  36. 36. Know your AUDIENCE Develop a KILLER POV Drive toward CONVERSION The right CONTENT MIX
  37. 37. “Content marketing is all the marketing that’s left.” - Seth Godin
  38. 38. 42 Critical Pivot A collection of valuable content for a broad, undefined audience to browse and consume. Content Repository Content Marketing A process for creating and distributing relevant and valuable content to attract, acquire, and engage a clearly defined and understood target audience – with the objective of driving profitable action.
  39. 39. Know what matters: Reach is good. Engagement is better. Conversions matter. VALUE POV METRICS AUDIENCE CONTENT MIX
  40. 40. Mapping Content to the Journey AWARE CONSIDER BUY REPEAT ADVOCATE BUYER NEEDS/GOALS CONTENT CONVERSION OPPORTUNITY CONVERSION OPPORTUNITY CONVERSION OPPORTUNITY CONVERSION OPPORTUNITY
  41. 41. POVAUDIENCE CONTENT MIX METRICS
  42. 42. Was it successful?
  43. 43. Fuel investment in content by showing that it delivers business value.

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