Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

Funk - Research Pipeline

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Nächste SlideShare
Rindova - Research Pipeline
Rindova - Research Pipeline
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 18 Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Anzeige

Ähnlich wie Funk - Research Pipeline (20)

Weitere von OMT Division (17)

Anzeige

Aktuellste (20)

Funk - Research Pipeline

  1. 1. Practical Challenges of Managing a Research Pipeline Russell J. Funk Assistant Professor Carlson School of Management University of Minnesota rfunk@umn.edu August 7, 2015
  2. 2. Roadmap I My background I Dilemmas of time I Specific challenges
  3. 3. A little bit about me. . . I PhD from Michigan Sociology, 2014 I Assistant Professor, Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship, Minnesota I interests in communication and information networks in organizations I focus on health care and R&D settings I use di↵erent methodological approaches, mostly quantitative or archival
  4. 4. Time is a central challenge in managing a pipeline Time is a factor in a few ways. . . I On the one hand, we need to contend with classic issues of time management—The amount of time we have to devote to research at any given moment is small. I On the one hand, we also need need to contend with issues around managing projects over long periods of time—The amount of time needed to get a paper through the pipeline is big.
  5. 5. A personal illustration. . . April 26, 2010 First preliminary draft completed July 1, 2011 Sent to the American Journal of Sociology September 26, 2011 Got an R&R January 29, 2012 Submitted a revision June 1, 2012 Rejected from the American Journal of Sociology June 16, 2012 Sent to Administrative Science Quarterly October 19, 2012 Got an R&R January 3, 2014 Submitted a revision April 2, 2014 Got a conditional acceptance May 1, 2014 Submitted a revision June 2, 2014 Got an acceptance September 18, 2014 Submitted final corrections October 6, 2014 Paper posted online in advance November 3, 2014 Paper published May 25, 2013 Sent to Academy of Management Review July 20, 2013 Got an R&R March 31, 2014 Submitted a revision June 10, 2014 Got another R&R February 12, 2015 Submitted a revision April 28, 2015 Got a conditional acceptance June 25, 2015 Submitted a revision Split into two papers I The first draft of this paper (with Dan Hirschman) was completed in April, 2010 I During the review process, on the advice of reviewers, we split the paper into two I The first paper appeared in late 2014, the second is just finishing up now in 2015 I From start to finish, the process took 5 years, and that excludes early drafting
  6. 6. Challenges
  7. 7. Challenge 1—Remembering what you’ve done I When you’re deep into a project like your dissertation, it’s easy to feel like you’ll never forget important details I You just spent 6 weeks cleaning a control variable, how could you ever not recall your process? I But it happens! I You want to guarantee you’ll be able to use your data long into the future Don’t be this guy when a reviewer asks you to rerun an analysis 3 years later!
  8. 8. Develop a habit of building good documentation I The best system is whatever one you’ll use regularly I Want to include all details necessary to replicate your process years later—file names, locations, versions, urls, contact information I Things that seem obvious now are easy to forget as time passes and you start new projects I Some possible tools: Excel, Word, any text editor, Google Docs, Evernote, automatic generators for code (e.g., pydoc, roxygen2)
  9. 9. Here’s a more extended example: https://github.com/russellfunk/icos/tree/master/matching
  10. 10. Challenge 2—Staying e cient I As you become involved in more projects (and other things) your time starts to disappear I Invest in learning software (e.g., qualitative data analysis, reference managers, spreadsheets), programming, and/or other tools that can extend your capabilities and make your workflow significantly more e cient I Finding the time can be hard, but it pays to go slow now so you can go fast later!
  11. 11. My favorite tool. . . Python I a general purpose programming language; huge community of users I great for web scraping and pulling data from online sources I also excellent for automating things like online data collection I resources for data analysis, visualization (geographic, network, textual)
  12. 12. Challenge 3—Staying at the frontier I It’s useful to think about yourself as an entrepreneur and your research as your “products” I You want spend some time thinking not only about your current pipeline, but also devoting time to considering what’s next I Similarly, what kinds of things can you do to best prepare for changing environments and to take advantage of future opportunities? I It’s easy to let demands of the present take precedent over preparing for the future
  13. 13. My approach to staying at the frontier I Attend lots of professional development workshops and similar conference events I Take advantage of great online courses and resources (e.g., Coursera, Codecademy) I Make it a rule to learn one new thing (however small) whenever you work on a project (e.g., a new literature, method, software tool) I Adjust the scope of what you want to learn to the scale of the project . . . for example. . .
  14. 14. A concrete example I As a goal for preparing my AoM presentations this year, I wanted to learn how to make a few plots in a new visualization package I It took a little longer to make some slides and I could have made the plots using tools I already know I But now I have an option in the future when I need to do something that couldn’t be done with other tools
  15. 15. Challenge 4—Clogged pipelines I Part of what makes research fun is that the more you do the more you see opportunities to do more I Given pressures to publish, it’s also very tempting to fill your pipeline with many projects I Make sure your pipeline doesn’t get clogged!
  16. 16. My suggestions for keeping the pipeline flowing I Adhere to the “No Paper Left Behind” policy I Focus on projects that are complementary I Minimize switching costs I Collaboration is great, but be mindful of the time and energy investments necessary for successful collaborations I Be careful not to spread yourself too thin . . . and finally. . .
  17. 17. “People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the things we haven’t done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying no to 1,000 things.”
  18. 18. Thank you!

×