Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.

Utilizing the open ntf domino api

601 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

OpenNTF Domino API / GraphDB in XPages

Veröffentlicht in: Software
  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

  • Gehören Sie zu den Ersten, denen das gefällt!

Utilizing the open ntf domino api

  1. 1. Boost your JAVA Code with the OpenNTF API Oliver Busse We4IT GmbH, Germany March 17, 2016
  2. 2. Oliver Busse • „Bleeding Yellow“ since R4.5 • Software Architect at We4IT • Member of the development team of Aveedo® Application Framework • IBM Champion for ICS in 2015 + 2016 • OpenNTF Member Director • XPages Advocate • IBM Bluemix curious @zeromancer1972 www.oliverbusse.com
  3. 3. Agenda • What is the OpenNTF Domino API? • Setup and Implementation • Other Considerations • Tons of examples
  4. 4. What is the OpenNTF Domino API?
  5. 5. What is the OpenNTF Domino API? • It‘s an open source project on OpenNTF • It‘s was started in April 2013 • It‘s maintained by generous developers you may know • It fills the gaps and gives the power you always wanted in Java for Domino • It‘s often refered to as „ODA“
  6. 6. What is the OpenNTF Domino API? (cont‘d) • The ODA consists of several packages • core • formula • rest • xsp • … • It‘s an OSGi plugin • It‘s designed for running on the Domino server (9.0.x+) • It‘s designed for XPages (Java, SSJS) and Plugins • It can‘t be used in Java Agents 
  7. 7. Key developers of the ODA • Nathan T. Freeman • Paul S. Withers • Jesse Gallagher • Roland Praml • Martin Jinoch • René Winkelmeyer • Tim Tripcony (never forgotten)
  8. 8. Setup and Implementation
  9. 9. Resources • Grab it from OpenNTF (recommended) • http://www.openntf.org/main.nsf/project.xsp?r=project/OpenNTF%20Domino%20 API • Grab it from the Git-Repo • https://github.com/OpenNTF/org.openntf.domino • Grab it from the OpenNTF Stash • https://stash.openntf.org/projects/ODA
  10. 10. System Logging • Since the ODA is an OSGi plugin you can install it via the update site mechanism • It runs as an extension to the XSP runtime on the HTTP server JVM • It comes with it‘s own logger
  11. 11. Setup: prepare the server • Set the signer of the NSF as „Sign or run…“ in server document‘s security section
  12. 12. Setup: prepare the updatesite • Create an updatesite NSF • Name it whatever you want • Make sure you set ACL to let the server READ documents
  13. 13. Setup: import ODA into update site • Find the site.xml file to import it as a local update site into your NSF • After import goto „Actions, Sign all Content“
  14. 14. Setup: add the ODA to server startup • Add a new line to your server‘s notes.ini file • edit file manually or • use a configuration setting (prefered) • OSGI_HTTP_DYNAMIC_BUNDLES=updatesite.nsf
  15. 15. Setup: add the ODA to server startup • This is what you should see when the server starts: HTTP JVM: CLFAD0330I: NSF Based plugins are being installed in the OSGi runtime. For more information please consult the log • Check the plugins with – tell http osgi ss openntf
  16. 16. Setup: prepare Domino Designer • Open DDE‘s preferences • Goto „Domino Designer“ section • Activate „Enable Eclipse plug-in install“ • Open the update site NSF you just created • Goto „Actions, Show URLs“ • Copy one of the two URLs to clipboard • Goto „File, Application, Install“ • Choose „Search for new features to install“ • On the next screen „Add (a) Remote Location“ • Enter a name for it and paste the URL in the clipboard • On the next screen check the ODA entry and click next/yes if you are asked to
  17. 17. Other Considerations
  18. 18. Other Considerations • ODA utilizes the OpenLog project • XspOpenLogUtil.logEvent(…) • XspOpenLogUtil.logError(…) • Get familiar with the OpenLog project from OpenNTF • Create a new OpenLog.nsf file in your server‘s root (if you haven‘t already)
  19. 19. Examples
  20. 20. Examples • Session handling • View handling (loops) • Document & Field handling • DateTime enhancements • Transactions • Xots • Graphs
  21. 21. Session handling
  22. 22. Session handling: different approaches • Extension Library • ExtlibUtil.getCurrentSession(); • ExtlibUtil.getCurrentSessionAsSigner(); • ExtlibUtil.getCurrentSessionAsSignerWithFullAccess(); • needs exception handling • XSPUtil • like ExtlibUtil • needs exception handling • Factory • Factory.getSession(); • uses enums for different session types • no exception handling needed!
  23. 23. View handling
  24. 24. View handling: what you are used to (1)
  25. 25. View handling: what you are used to (2)
  26. 26. What you now are able to do
  27. 27. Document handling
  28. 28. Safe lines of code by using new methods • New creation methods • Database.createDocument(String, Object, …) • Database.createDocument(HashMap fields) • Alternatives to replaceItemValue • Document.put(String field, Object o) • Document.putAll(HashMap fields) • Alternatives to getItemValueXXX • Document.get(Object o) // document acts like a Map<?> • Document.getItemValue(String field, Class type)
  29. 29. getItemValue: what you are used to • getItemValue returns a Vector • Vectors are not type save • editor / compiler complains non-type-safety • they can contain „anything“ • you have to check what is inside • if the item does not exist you are running into trouble…
  30. 30. getItemValue: what you can do now • cast to a type of your choice • ArrayList<?> values = doc.getItemValue(„foo", ArrayList.class); • forget type safety • define your own! • a non existing item is returned as null, not as empty Vector • can be handled
  31. 31. DateTime enhancements
  32. 32. DateTime enhancements • Session.createDateTime(y,m,d,hh,mm,ss) • uses int values • conversion toJavaDate() not necessary • DateTime.isBefore(); • DateTime.isAfter(); • useful comparisons • DateTime.equalsIgnoreDate(); • DateTime.equalsIgnoreTime();
  33. 33. Transactions
  34. 34. Transactions • ODA adds transactional capabilities to your Notes data • You can modify documents without saving them individually (e.g. in a loop) • You can also rollback every modification if you need to (e.g. when you run into an error)
  35. 35. Transactions (cont‘d) • Create a new DatabaseTransaction object from the database • DatabaseTransaction txn = db.startTransaction(); • Perform your modifications • Decide whether to commit or rollback • txn.commit(); • txn.rollback();
  36. 36. Xots
  37. 37. Xots • Xots = XPages OSGi Tasklet Service • It‘s the extended version of DOTS (Domino Tasklet Service) • Use cases • Can be coded inside the NSF, no plugin project needed • Multi-threaded tasks like Runnable, but you can return values • Bulk execution of time consuming code • very new feature (alpha)
  38. 38. Xots (cont‘d) • Advantages • More granular time and event triggering than in Agents • Can run with server-side permissions • Runs in a shared container (JVM) unlikely of an Agent which runs in a dedicated JVM • you can exchange data between tasklets • It‘s coded in a plain Java class and not in an Agent design element • You can use SCM systems
  39. 39. Xots (cont‘d) • Core elements of tasklet • Interface Callable<?> • Interface Future<?> • get() method to get the return value(s) • only if you are interested in a return value • Class Xots from the ODA • submit() method to create a tasklet • schedule() methods to create a periodic tasklet • use the PeriodicScheduler!
  40. 40. „Graphs“ http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/graph-database
  41. 41. Graph DB A graph database, also called a graph-oriented database, is a type of NoSQL database that uses graph theory to store, map and query relationships. A graph database is essentially a collection of nodes and edges. Each node represents an entity (such as a person or business) and each edge represents a connection or relationship between two nodes. http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/graph-database
  42. 42. Graphs – terminology • Vertices (Nodes) • Properties (Key-Value pairs) • Edges • Connections, Relations between Vertices • ElementStores • for us: NSF databases • MetaverseIDs • Replica + UNID (hashed) • internal use only (don‘t care about them)
  43. 43. Graph DB – in Domino? • Vertices and Edges are stored as Documents • The data container is a NSF • The ElementStore defines the filepath to the NSF • An ElementStore can hold different types of Vertices • Usually you create one ElementStore for each Vertice type
  44. 44. Let‘s see the demo & some code
  45. 45. Resources • The XPages demo application • https://bitbucket.org/zeromancer1972/sutol-2015-oda-graph-demo • A nice glossary • http://www.intec.co.uk/from-xpages-to-web-app-glossary/ • OpenNTF Domino API • http://www.openntf.org/main.nsf/project.xsp?r=project/OpenNTF%20Domino%20API • http://www.openntf.org/main.nsf/project.xsp?r=project/OpenNTF%20Domino%20API%20Demo%20Database • Xots • http://www.intec.co.uk/xots-background-and-multithreaded-tasks-the-openntf-domino-api-way-part-one/ • http://www.intec.co.uk/xots-background-and-multithreaded-tasks-the-openntf-domino-api-way-part-two/ • http://www.intec.co.uk/xots-background-and-multithreaded-tasks-the-openntf-domino-api-way-part-three/ • Graphs • http://de.slideshare.net/ktree19/the-graph-revolution
  46. 46. Q & A
  47. 47. Thank you!
  48. 48. www.we4it.com

×