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Association of Colleges SEND Conference December 2017

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Nigel Evans HMI, National lead for learners with high needs, gave this presentation in London, 7 December 2017.

Its topics are: education and training provision and SEND; young people poorly served by education; how effective is current provision?

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Association of Colleges SEND Conference December 2017

  1. 1. AoC SEND Conference Nigel Evans HMI National lead for learners with high needs 07 December 2017 AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 1
  2. 2. What will this presentation cover?  How well education and training provision meet the needs of young people with special educational needs, disabilities or have significant barriers to achieving their potential  Who are the young people currently poorly served by education?  How effective is current provision in helping young people achieve their potential and improve social mobility? AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 2
  3. 3. Who are we talking about? Learners:  with learning difficulties and disabilities, but not benefiting from a EHC plan (SEND support)  on the autistic spectrum  previously excluded from school  who were elective home educated  with emotional, social and behavioural difficulties  attending non-registered schools  who have experienced abuse  with poor mental health  with unstructured or unstable lifestyles  known to the youth offending services AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 3
  4. 4. Children and young people with SEND – what do LA SEND inspections say  Children and young people identified as needing SEND support had a much poorer experience of the education system than their peers.  Too often, local area leaders were not clear how their actions were improving outcomes for those children and young people identified as needing SEND support.  Children and young people who have SEND were found to be excluded, absent or missing from school much more frequently than other pupils nationally. AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 4
  5. 5. Children and young people with SEND – what do LA SEND inspections say  Fragmented approach to identifying support and developing an appropriate education and support package  Lack of an authority-wide overview means that local area officers rarely have the ‘big picture’ that would enable them to provide the necessary early help, coordinate professional education and develop a long-term, strategic approach to meeting the needs of these marginalised and often ignored young people  School leaders use unofficial exclusions too readily to cope with children and young people who have SEND.  An alarming number of parents said that some school leaders asked them to take their children home. This was in addition, or as an alternative, to fixed-term exclusions. It is illegal. AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 5
  6. 6. Children and young people with SEND – what do LA SEND inspections say  Lack of coordination of services means that key information is not shared  Poor responses to specific indicators such as poor progress of pupils receiving SEN support, absence, fixed-term exclusions  Ineffective procedures to give children and young people and their families early access to the services they need to prevent failure  Poor diagnostic support, over emphasis on identification and not on providing appropriate support AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 6
  7. 7. Children and young people with SEND – what do LA SEND inspections say  Lack of clarity and joint working where the individual’s needs are health, education or care related or both.  Joint commissioning underdeveloped  Health services not commissioned beyond 16 or 19  Poor co-production or involvement with parents or young people in the planning, monitoring and evaluation of services AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 7
  8. 8. What happens to excluded young people  Almost all young people excluded from school leave without qualifications needed to access the workplace  Four out of every five young people excluded from school become NEET  Excluded young people and children who have been looked after in their lifetime make up the majority of the prison population  Excluded young people are nine times more likely to have poor mental health or other SEND  Source IPPR report Making The Difference: Breaking the link between school exclusion and social exclusion AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 8
  9. 9. Traineeships AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 9
  10. 10. When do traineeships work for young people from disadvantaged groups?  Detailed and well-structured initial assessment  Structure and routine driving home the importance of attendance, punctuality and good behaviour  Relevance of English and mathematics in the workplace  Progression from work experience  Opportunities of wider experience  Personalised support programmes helping build trust and self- confidence AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 10
  11. 11. Traineeships  Are they distinctive enough?  Success measures  Funding AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 11
  12. 12. Traineeships  Positives  Traineeships are carefully planned and managed.  Teachers match the skills and knowledge of trainees to the requirements of the job roles.  Managers and staff have developed effective links with employers to provide valuable work experience for trainees.  Trainees benefit from good information, advice, guidance and preparation for the workplace.  Negatives  Poor planning of activities and skills development  Insufficient opportunities to develop the skills necessary for progression to the next stage  Poor use of information about trainees to plan learning and provide the necessary support  Too few trainees progress to employment, apprenticeships or further education AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 12
  13. 13. What are apprenticeships for? Apprenticeships offer a ladder of opportunity for people of all ages, they boost business and make a profound difference to the economic stability and productivity of this country. IfA June 2017 AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 13
  14. 14. The Ofsted Strategy 2017 - 2022  Just as important is Ofsted’s role in system-wide improvement, both through helping to create the conditions that enable social mobility and allow young people to reach their potential and also in reducing regulatory burdens across the system. − Does the system enable people who have not reached level 2 by the end of schooling to enter the labour market? − Do young people benefit from apprenticeships? AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 14
  15. 15. How do apprenticeships fit in then? 2016/17  259,430 people started a level 2 apprenticeship  195,770 people started a level 3 apprenticeship  11,610 people started a level 4 apprenticeship  Level 2 DOWN by 11%  Level 3 UP by 3%  Level 4 UP by 22%  Under 19s DOWN by 8%  19 – 24 DOWN by 8% (source DFE Apps Data Oct 17) AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 15
  16. 16. Changes since the 2012 ‘Creating an inclusive apprenticeship offer’ report AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 16 2010/11 2015/16 Total apprentices LDD Total apprentices LDD 442,700 35,600 (8%) 405,170 35,100 (9%) Success rates Success rates 74% 70% 67% 64%
  17. 17. Careers education, information advice and guidance (CEIAG)  Very little detail on the effectiveness of CEIAG  Very little reference to the specific needs of disadvantaged groups  No judgements on the impact of the work of careers guidance staff in improving outcomes for these groups. AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 17
  18. 18. The future? The ‘transition year’  students who are not ready for post-16 education have an opportunity to develop the skills they need to progress either to the technical option (a T level or an apprenticeship), the academic option, a traineeship or other post-16 education.  the transition year must help them to make choices not just about technical or academic education and training, but also about other programmes such as traineeships, so that their programme can be tailored to best prepare them for their choice Source: DfE Post-16 technical education reforms October 2017 AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 18
  19. 19. The future?  Good partnership working that encourages relevant agencies to work together  Flexible and personalised study programmes for all  Strong pastoral support  A transition year that genuinely gives young people the support and experiences they need to make progress  Effective traineeships that lead to apprenticeships  Apprenticeships that are positive about disability, make reasonable adjustments, use Access to Work support effectively and ensure that those with hidden impairments are not disadvantaged AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 19
  20. 20. Ofsted on the web and on social media www.gov.uk/ofsted http://reports.ofsted.gov.uk www.linkedin.com/company/ofsted www.youtube.com/ofstednews www.slideshare.net/ofstednews www.twitter.com/ofstednews AoC SEND conference December 2017 Slide 20

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