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Big Data.compressed

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Big Data.compressed

  1. 1. DECEMBER 2015 AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT DISTRIBUTED IN THE GUARDIAN ON BEHALF OF MEDIAPLANET WHO TAKE SOLE RESPONSIBILITY FOR ITS CONTENTS BigDataFUTUREOFTECH.CO.UK PHOTO: TECHUK ONLINE AT FUTUREOFTECH.CO.UK MarkRoyonhowBig Datahelpsbrandsfocus onbettertargeting techUKCEO JulianDavid OnhowtheUKcan fulfilitsBigData potential
  2. 2. 2 FUTUREOFTECH.CO.UK MEDIAPLANETAN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET Looking into Big Data? Now it’s time to engage with rapid insight Wrangle, Analyse, Predict, Anticipate ...Iterate, Experiment, Study & Learn Hadoop can be tamed, timescales met, business users excited, executives educated Are you looking to get more value from your data? See kognitio.com for an informed future C M Y CM MY CY CMY K Kognitio_Guardian_BigData_201x90.pdf 1 27/11/2015 18:11:59 READ MORE ON FUTUREOFTECH.CO.UK Cloud industry Alex Hilton on the transformative properties of hybrid cloud solutions P4 Saul Judah Three expert recommendations for eliminating unnecessary business processes P6 Business Intelligence A piece from Innovation Enterprise on the need to harness the potential of Business Intelligence IN THIS ISSUE Security safeguards key to big data growth There is significant economic potential in big data, but changes are needed to unlock it Please recycleFollow us facebook.com/MediaplanetUK @MediaplanetUK Managing Director: Carl Soderblom Content and Production Manager: Henrietta Hunter Designer: Danielle Stagg Business Developer: Dominic McWilliam Project Manager: Octavian Donnelly E-mail: octavian.donnelly@mediaplanet.com Mediaplanet contact info: Phone: +44 (0) 203 642 0737 E-mail: info.uk@mediaplanet.com T he impor- tance of Big Data to the UK was con- firmed in 2012 when it was recog- nised by the Government as one of the 8 Great Tech- nologies vital to the eco- nomic and social future of the UK. Big Data is a cata- lyst for economic growth, a key tool in achieving long term productivity, essential for job creation and vital to maintaining the UK’s global position as a digital society. The UK has a fantastic op- portunity to be a world- leader in Big Data, and is making steady progress. However, we must do more to highlight the so- cial and economic oppor- tunities and mitigate risks facing the development of Big Data technologies in the UK. To successfully unlock the value of big data, we must improve public trust in Julian David CEO, techUK “We must improve public trust in how their personal data is collected” how their personal data is collected, stored and used, particularly given the grow- ing cyber threat. Having in place a legal framework that allows for business innovation while also protecting per- sonal information is cru- cial. The new General Da- ta Protection Regulation (GDPR) in development in the European Commis- sion has the potential to underpin consumer trust and confidence. However, if European policy-makers do not properly consider certain aspects, this could have a chilling effect on the growth of Big Data industries in Europe. The potential for Big Data is huge. The Centre for Economics & Business Research estimated that by 2017 Big Data could contrib- ute £216 billion and gener- ate 58,000 new jobs in the UKandIreland.Wemustget it right. @MediaplanetUK
  3. 3. FUTUREOFTECH.CO.UK 3MEDIAPLANET AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET I nformation. Intel- ligence. Data. Call it what you want, but every savvy com- pany needs it, be- cause — used properly — it can provide valuable in- sight that increases business productivity, profitability andsecurity. Machine-generated data is one of the fastest-grow- ing and most complex areas of Big Data. “Mobile phones, application logs, network infrastructure, cloud ser- vices, sensors in cars and planes — all of these things and more generate ma- chine data,” says Matthew Davies, Head of Marketing at operational intelligence plat- form,Splunk. “This is important infor- mation that can help a company deliver superi- or IT operational analytics and enhance its real time se- curity intelligence; plus it can pinpoint what a busi- ness’ customers are doing and how its products are per- forming. Once our custom- ers see what is possible with machine data, they immedi- atelyseethebenefitofit.” Solutions The problem is, machine- generated data is not easily accessible.Splunk saw an op- portunity as well as a need to make machine data accessi- ble, usable and valuable, and develop solutions that allow machine-generated data to be easily collected, indexed, searched and visualised. An expertinitsfield,Splunknow has more than 10,000 cus- tomersacrosstheworld,from flying doctors in the Aus- tralian outback - who use its solutions to monitor the temperatures of medicines and locations of planes - to blue chip companies such as UniCredit, John Lewis,Voda- foneandTesco. UniCredit, for instance, uses Splunk Enterprise for real-time insights into operational data and key business metrics. The bank has improved the experi- ence it offers customers by reducing services down- time and provides vis- ibility into key business metrics such as served cli- ents by bank branches, in- ternet banking and mo- bile banking channels, and number of new opened bank accounts. Versatile John Lewis also uses Splunk, in order to monitor its web- site and customer journey to ensure an excellent customer Machine-generateddataisoneofthemostcomplexandfastestgrowingareasofbigdata–anditcangive businessesacompetitiveedge Bringingbigvaluetomachinedata COMMERCIAL FEATURE experience; and Domino’s pizza uses Splunk to support its e-commerce environ- ment, by studying e-com- merce logs, troubleshooting issues, assisting with moni- toring, providing feedback to developers and deliv- ering real-time insights tomarketing. “Increasingly, companies are experiencing big ‘busi- ness moments’,” says Matthew Davies. “For in- stance, a company might be about to have a major outage because a data base has run out of memory.Machine data provides insight in real time so that problems like these can be fixed faster, customer experiences can be improved protection can be provided against a security attack, and money can be saved. That’s why it’s so vital in a competitiveworld.” “Machine- generated data is one of the fastest growing and most complex areas of Big Data” Matthew Davies Head of marketing, Splunk
  4. 4. INSPIRATION EXPERT TIPS Sue Daley Head of Programme for Big Data, Cloud & Mobile, techUK Read more at futureoftech.co.uk A ccording to our latest re- search on the state of UK Cloud market, 84 per cent of organisations currently use at least one Cloud service, up from 48 per cent in 2010. Moreover, 78 per cent of those organisations use two or more services, a significant increase on the same figure recorded in 2014, highlight- ing how the delivery model is making its presence felt in businesses today. This growth story owes much to the fact that Cloud services are having a profound impact on the design and delivery of organ- isations’ IT capabilities and, as a result, on the performance and flexibility of their busi- nesses thereafter.At its heart,the concept of Cloudisallaboutorganisationaltransforma- tion though the
agile on-demand delivery of ITsolutions;itisnotsomuchaboutthetech- nologyitself.Cloudistransformingtheways thatbusinessescommunicateinternallyand with their customers, providing more flex- ible and faster access to technology, reduc- ing capital expenditure and shaving healthy amountsoffofoverallITspends. ButwhatisclearisthatCloudisbutonepart of an increasingly complex and diverse pic- ture. Although penetration has increased year-on-year,and indeed,faster thanwe had anticipated, Cloud-based solutions still con- stitute a relatively small part of the wider IT estate and half of organisations expect to keep specific applications and services on- premise indefinitely. This, by no means, is to suggest that appetite for Cloud is on the wane; more a reflection of the fact that not everything can or should be migrated.With this being the case,the majority of organisa- tionswill be maintaining Hybrid ITenviron- mentsfortheforeseeablefuture. Cloud computing is playing an increasingly important role in businesses across the country, regardless of their organisational size or the sector they operate in, as business leaders turn to Cloud services to transform their IT estates HowHybrid Cloudsitsatthe heartofbusiness transformation 4 FUTUREOFTECH.CO.UK AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET Theroleof analytics Big Data analytics provide UK businesses with the opportunity to combine, consolidate and then analyse large datasets to find previously hidden insights and knowledge. For example, by identifying patterns in customer behaviour, common customer likes and dislikes and previ- ously unknown customer requirements busi- nesses can develop personalised goods and ser- vices based on consumers’ needs andwants. OveralltheadoptionofBigDatabyUKbusiness- es, of all size and sector, is being driven not only by the ability to be more responsive to custom- ers but also as a driver of operational efficiencies, cost reductions, increased agility and as a tool for gaining a single view of the lifecycle of data across an organisation and its supply chain.
  5. 5. HybridITis hardly anew phenomenonas it relates to the co-existence of multiple IT deployment models –which has been true for most businesses since the move away from mainframes in the 1980s. But most causes of a hybrid environment have his- torically been the product of a transition processratherthananexplicitordeliberate strategy.Arguablythisisnolongerthecase andweareseeingHybridITestatesemerge bydesign. Fromabusinesspointofview,suchanap- proach to IT is a useful one. Rather than charging full-throttle towards one type of infrastructure, businesses are now able to pick and choose the types of IT that they feel most comfortable with, and that are most appropriate for their individual ap- plications. Embracing a hybrid approach givesbusinessestheflexibilitytoconstruct an IT estate that will feed into the needs of the organisation, evolving as-and- when required.This bottom-up evolu- tionaryapproachremovesmanyofthe risksofgrandall-encompassingITpro- jects,which tend to be expensive, dif- ficulttocoordinateandslowtoreactto changingbusinessrequirements. CloudisaprovenITdeploymentmod- el, but for most organisations it is one ofmanythat
willbeused.Thebenefits of adopting Cloud alongside on-prem- ise are proven and Hybrid ITis a natu- ral and unstoppable evolution in the IT landscape, which will serve to en- hance business outcomes with the continued investment of time andinnovation. “Cloud is transforming the ways that businesses communicate internally and with their customers” Read the full story futureoftech. co.uk MEDIAPLANET 5AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET Alex Hilton CEO, Cloud Industry Forum COLUMN Dr Tony Venus Head of Standards and Qualifications, Tech Partnership Tomorrow’s dataanalysts N early 90 per cent of em- ployers identify data analysis as a core skills gap, according to Tech Partnership research. And with big data often cited as ‘the new oil’ – the fuel for the economy over future decades–thisshortagematters. Filling those gaps needs a multifaceted approach, but apprenticeships are an in- creasingly popular way to attract and train talented people. Tech Partner- ship employers have recently developed data analyst apprenticeship standards which, if approved, will be available from 2016. And the new Degree Apprenticeshipscanincludeadataanaly- sis specialism, giving participants an academic training while immersing theminabusinessenvironment. PHOTO: ISHBONES
  6. 6. 6 FUTUREOFTECH.CO.UK MEDIAPLANETAN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET COLUMN George Hill Managing editor and online director, Innovation Enterprise Utilisethepotentialof BusinessIntelligence tocreate competitive advantage The Ancient Greeks would use early examples of coins to buy and sell, then keep ledgers to keep a record of every- thing they had traded that day. Early homosapiens would paint pictures in caves to show how many animals had been hunted that day. Even Herodotus, arguably the first histori- an, claims that there were tablets on the Pyra- mids at Giza describing how many radishes, on- ions and garlic had been consumed. All of these are forms of business intelligence, but not in the way we know it today. In 2015 we have hundreds of Terabytes of data to investigate how our businesses are performing and what we can do to improve performance. It may be several million times more complex than in ancient times, but the truth is that the businesses who utilise it, do so for the same reasons: business success. From the ways that data can help retailers stock, sell and profit, through to how Google and Facebook can make billions through user data, it dictates every business decision today. We learn about the inner workings of how companies use their data due to our exten- sive network of industry summits that we hold across the world.We have one in London on 10th May, Big Data Innovation London. If you were interested in finding out more about how the world’s most successful companies utilise their data, why not have a look? the right data is provided to the right person (or thing) in the right time or place does it become valuable. It’s not how bigyour data is,it’swhat you do with it. The continued rise of digital and information-based busi- ness models will cause cas- ualties in traditional indus- tries, particularly among the incumbents that are not pre- pared for the digital world. Gartner offers three key recommendations for busi- ness executives and infor- mation leaders: start identi- fying potential data-fuelled disruptions, create an infor- mation management strat- egy and lastly, embed your information strategy in the heart of your business strat- egy and governance process- es. Only once you determine what information can im- pact your business strategy and how you plan to collect and organise it, are you in a position to harness it effec- tively. This could take the form of self-service ana- lytics, where employees in different business units can perform queries and gener- ate analytical insights on the company data most relevant to their areas of expertise, without necessarily need- ing IT support or a degree in data science. An organisation with em- ployees who are empowered to experiment with and learn from information and analytics is one positioned to innovate and capture rev- enue from new trends and markets. A coherent infor- mation framework and strategy is the means by which companies can turn data’s potential into com- petitive advantage and prof- it — the means to take con- trol of and harness innova- tion rather than be swept away by it. Threerecommendations for the information age NEWS The adage “knowledge is power” is not new, yet is increasingly valid in a world where businesses ponder how to harness the unprecedented volume and velocity of data around us. Gartner predicts that by 2020, informationwill be used to re- invent, digitalise or eliminate 80 per cent of all business processes and products from a decade earlier. The likes of Uber and Airbnb demonstrate how companies that simply broker information can revo- lutionise an industry without owning any physical assets. The huge success of such companies is not just luck or good timing. Underneath outwardly simple business models lies serious expertise in managing data and har- nessing its power. Data on its own has potential, but is inherently dumb. Only when By Saul Judah, research director, Gartner
  7. 7. MEDIAPLANET 7AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MEDIAPLANET COMMERCIAL FEATURE O ne of the big- gest issues facing finance houses today centres on running credit checks on the client without causing unnecessary complica- tions for said client and one increasingly successful way to do this is to work with smart data as opposed to big data. One company that is doing this is Creamfinance, an online consumer finance company that caters to near prime consumers and that was founded in 2012 in Lat- via. It has subsequently expe- rienced exponential growth, expanding into Poland, where its headquarters now are, the Czech Republic, Slo- vakia, Georgia and Austria, where its IT system is based. Unique Offering “Creamfinance doesn’t compete with banks: we are providing smaller and more convenient loans for the consumer,” says Matiss Ansviesulis, co-founder and CEO of the company. “Our business has expanded very fast across different geo- graphies because it is based on technology that is about managing the process of approval for loans scoring for clients and this can be rolled out across borders to different countries.” He points out that while five of the countries Creamfinance operates in are members of the EU, Georgia is not, a clear indication that the business model has the potential to expand the company much further still. Understanding the options Creamfinance provides three types of loans: instalment loans allowing customers to borrow, say, €2,000 over 24 months and pay back the capital and interest in mon- thly instalments over two years; lines of credit, which are similar to a bank over- draft and allow customers to draw the credit they need on a revolving basis and also have a time limit; and small loans. These will typically be for a few hundred euros and will be repayable within the month, but although they sound similar to the widely criticised payday loans in the UK, they are in fact quite different. In much of Europe, interest and regulation on this type of loan is much more tightly regulated than has been the case in the UK. Credit Risk What these three types of loan and indeed any type of loan have in common, of course, is that it is vital to assess the credit risk of the would-be lendee. Tradi- tionally this has been done through concentrating on a process known as big data: “This focuses on volume and velocity, the size of the data and how fast it can be pro- cessed,” says Ansviesulis. However, not only can this be time consuming and labo- rious: it can also frustrating for the client who might have to fill out pages of informa- tion and then have to wait for an answer. One of the rea- sons behind Creamfinance’s success is that it utilises a different and considerably more streamlined process known as smart data. Ensuring Accuracy “We are much more concerned with the value and the accuracy of the data we’re getting,” says Ansvie- sulis. “We’re focused not on getting as much data as pos- sible but looking for data that is valuable while ensuring it is still accurate. For exa- mple, we check with credit rating bureaus to see if there are unpaid loans or, say, utility bills, but we also have to check to make sure the data is not obsolete.” That not only speeds up the process for Creamfinance, but it makes life considerably easier for the clients as well. “The overriding feature of what we provide is conve- nience,” says Ansviesulis. “We’re stripping away the nonsense so many customers have to go through and we want to make it as simple as possible, so clients can get their loans with just one click. Even now, it is still difficult to get a loan and the consumers don’t care if they’re using a bank or not: they care about the price and convenience.” Delivering on Promises The success of Creamfi- nance’s approach speaks for itself. “For companies that use big data as their driving strategy, the client needs to give a lot of information, fill out a lot of forms and there’s a big gap between what big data promises and what it delivers,” he says. “But we are in the process of delive- ring a prototype that sticks to what we know and delivers one click convenience. Smart data is still not so mains- tream but the value of what it delivers is much higher than big data. It actually really works.” Matiss Ansviesulis Co-founder and CEO, Creamfinance PHOTO:CREAMFINANCE By Virginia Blackburn Companies using a smarter way to gather their data

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