Successfully reported this slideshow.

TALIS 2013 Results: An International Perspective on Teaching and Learning

102.907 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) aims to provide valid, timely and comparable information to help countries review and define policies for developing a high-quality teaching profession. It is an opportunity for teachers and school leaders to provide input into educational policy analysis and development in key areas. Themes explored include professional development, school leadership, teaching practices, school climate, appraisal and feedback, job satisfaction and teacher profiles.

Veröffentlicht in: Bildung, Karriere

TALIS 2013 Results: An International Perspective on Teaching and Learning

  1. 1. 1 TALIS 2013 Results An international perspective on teaching and learning
  2. 2. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 22 TALIS in Brief …representing more than 4 million teachers in 34 countries… Over 100 thousand randomly selected lower secondary teachers and their school leaders from over 6500 schools …took an internationally-agreed survey about the working conditions and learning environments in their schools… …responding to questions about their background, their teaching practices, support and development, their relationships with colleagues and students and the leadership in their schools
  3. 3. Developing Teaching as a profession Recruit top candidates into the profession Support teachers in continued development of practice Retain and recognise effective teachers – path for growth Improve the societal view of teaching as a profession Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status33 TALIS seeks to help with …
  4. 4. Overview of TALIS The Learning Environment: Characteristics of Teachers and Schools The Importance of School Leadership Developing and Supporting Teachers Improving Teaching Using Appraisal and Feedback Examining Teacher Practices and Classroom Environment Teacher Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction: Why they Matter
  5. 5. School Leadership
  6. 6. 41% 22% 15% 11% 7% 4% 36% 24% 16% 14% 6% 4% Spain Admin/leadership Curriculum/teaching Students Parents/guardians Community Other Average proportion of time lower secondary principals report spending on the following activities throughout the school year Principals’ working time6 Average
  7. 7. Poland Serbia Croatia Spain Portugal SlovakRepublic England(UK) Israel Australia CzechRepublic France Finland Norway Flanders(Belgium) Italy Average Bulgaria Latvia Romania Brazil Denmark Estonia Mexico Sweden Netherlands Chile Singapore Iceland Alberta(Canada) AbuDhabi(UAE) Korea Japan Malaysia UnitedStates 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Instructional leadership training or course School administration or principal training programme or course Teacher training/education programme or course Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 77 Elements not included in principals' formal education Percentage of lower secondary principals whose formal education did not include:
  8. 8. Developing and Supporting Teachers
  9. 9. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 99 Not everywhere where induction programmes are accessible do teachers use them Percentage of lower secondary teachers with less than 3 years experience at their school and as a teacher, who are working in schools with the following reported access to formal induction programmes, and their reported participation in such programmes 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Iceland Finland Serbia Japan SlovakRepublic Netherlands Norway Alberta(Canada) Flanders(Belgium) Australia UnitedStates Croatia Korea Average Chile Israel Malaysia England(UnitedKingdom) Romania CzechRepublic Singapore Access Participation %
  10. 10. Netherlands Romania Slovak Republic Bulgaria Iceland Brazil Czech Republic England (United Kingdom) Australia Alberta (Canada) Latvia Portugal Korea Average Estonia Spain Abu Dhabi (UAE) Croatia Poland Mexico Chile Norway Finland Denmark France Flanders (Belgium) ItalySweden Singapore Malaysia Serbia Israel Japan United States 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Percentageofteachersworkinginschoolswherethe principalreportsthatmentoringprogrammesare availableforallteachersintheschool Percentage of teachers who report presently having an assigned mentor to support them Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1010 Not everywhere where principals say mentoring is available do teachers have mentors
  11. 11. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1111 Teachers' needs for professional development Percentage of lower secondary teachers indicating they have a high level of need for professional development in the following areas 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Knowledge of the curriculum Knowledge of the subject field(s) School management and administration Pedagogical competencies Developing competencies for future work Teaching cross-curricular skills Student evaluation and assessment practice Student career guidance and counselling Approaches to individualised learning Teaching in a multicultural or multilingual setting Student behaviour and classroom management New technologies in the workplace ICT skills for teaching Teaching students with special needs United States Average
  12. 12. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1212 Barriers to professional development participation Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" that the following elements represent barriers to their participation in professional development activities 0 20 40 60 80 100 Do not have the pre-requisites (e.g., qualifications, experience, seniority) There is a lack of employer support Lack of time due to family responsibilities There is no relevant professional development offered Professional development is too expensive/unaffordable There are no incentives for participating in such activities Professional development conflicts with my work schedule United States Average
  13. 13. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1313 Professional development recently undertaken by teachers by type and intensity Percentage of teachers who participated in the following professional development activities in the 12 months prior to the survey Average number of days of participation among those who participated Courses/workshops 8 Education conferences or seminars where teachers and/or researchers present their research results and discuss educational issues 4 Observation visits to other schools 3 In-service training courses in business premises, public organisations or non-governmental organisations 7 Observation visits to business premises, public organisations or non-governmental organisations 3 Participation in a network of teachers formed specifically for the professional development of teachers Individual or collaborative research on a topic of interest to the teacher Mentoring and/or peer observation and coaching, as part of a formal school arrangement Qualification programme (e.g., a degree programme) 71% 44% 19% 14% 13% 37% 31% 29% 18%
  14. 14. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1414 Participation in professional development and level of support received by teachers Australia Brazil Bulgaria Chile Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Latvia Malaysia Mexico Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Serbia Singapore Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) Alberta (Canada) England (United Kingdom) Flanders (Belgium) Average United States 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 Percentageofteacherswhohadtopayfornoneofthe professionaldevelopmentactivitiesundertaken Percentage of teachers who undertook some professional development activities in the 12 months prior to the survey
  15. 15. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1515 Impact of professional development …the professional development in which they have participated has had a positive impact on their teaching. Regardless of the content, over 3/4 of teachers report that…
  16. 16. Improving Teaching Using Appraisal and Feedback
  17. 17. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1717 Teachers and feedback On average across TALIS countries, ...and only one in 5 receive feedback from three sources. Just above half of the teachers report receiving feedback on their teaching from one or two sources
  18. 18. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1818 Emphasis placed on feedback Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report the feedback they received emphasised the following issues with a "moderate" or "high importance" 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Studentperformance Behaviourmanagement Pedagogicalcompetency Subjectknowledge Assessmentpractices Teamwork Studentfeedback Feedbackfromparents Teachingspecialneedsstudents Feedbacktootherteachers Multilingualsettings Average United States
  19. 19. Feedback following classroom observation % Feedback following assessment of teachers' content knowledge % Feedback following analysis of student test scores % External individuals or bodies 16 11 9 School principal 39 20 24 Member(s) of school management team 32 20 27 Assigned mentors 12 9 7 Other teachers (not a part of the management team) 24 15 18 I have never received this feedback in this school. 21 44 35 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1919 Where feedback comes from
  20. 20. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2020 Teachers feedback : direct classroom observations 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Bulgaria Poland UnitedStates Romania Alberta(Canada) Croatia CzechRepublic AbuDhabi(UAE) Flanders(Belgium) Serbia SlovakRepublic Japan Israel Average Singapore Latvia Brazil Mexico Malaysia Sweden Estonia England(UK) Norway Finland Portugal Denmark Korea Chile Italy Netherlands France Spain Iceland Australia Percentageofteachers Principals School Management Other teachers
  21. 21. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2121 Teachers feedback : analysis of students' test scores 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Romania Bulgaria Poland AbuDhabi(UAE) UnitedStates Alberta(Canada) Mexico Israel Brazil CzechRepublic France Serbia SlovakRepublic Latvia Average Norway Malaysia Flanders(Belgium) Estonia Denmark Croatia Portugal Japan Chile England(UK) Sweden Italy Singapore Korea Spain Australia Netherlands Iceland Finland Percentageofteachers Principals School Management Other teachers
  22. 22. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2222 Teachers feedback : assessment of teacher content knowledge 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Bulgaria Poland Romania AbuDhabi(UAE) UnitedStates SlovakRepublic Serbia CzechRepublic Alberta(Canada) Israel Latvia Estonia Brazil Flanders(Belgium) Mexico Japan Average Malaysia Chile Norway Singapore Finland Portugal Denmark Sweden Italy Korea Iceland Netherlands England(UK) France Spain Australia Percentageofteachers Principals School Management Other teachers
  23. 23. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Iceland Finland Sweden Flanders(Belgium) France Italy Denmark Netherlands Norway Spain Australia Croatia Alberta(Canada) UnitedStates Japan Portugal Average Israel England(UK) Chile Estonia Serbia CzechRepublic SlovakRepublic Mexico Singapore Brazil Korea Poland AbuDhabi(UAE) Bulgaria Romania Latvia Malaysia Percentageofteachers Analysis of students' test scores Direct classroom observation Assessment of content knowledge Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2323 Teachers feedback : never received
  24. 24. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Malaysia Singapore Poland Bulgaria Latvia Romania CzechRepublic Chile AbuDhabi(UAE) Korea SlovakRepublic Estonia UnitedStates England(UK) Average Japan Sweden Mexico Australia Italy Serbia Alberta(Canada) Israel Croatia Finland Netherlands Denmark Brazil Portugal Iceland Spain Flanders(Belgium) Norway France Percentageofteachers The best performing teachers in this school receive the greatest recognition Teacher appraisal and feedback have little impact upon the way teachers teach in the classroom Teacher appraisal and feedback are largely done to fulfil administrative requirements Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2424 Impact of teacher appraisal and feedback systems in schools Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" that :
  25. 25. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2525 Consequences of feedback Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" that: 0 20 40 60 80 If a teacher is consistently underperforming, he/she would be dismissed The best performing teachers in this school receive the greatest recognition Teacher appraisal and feedback have little impact upon the way teachers teach in the classroom A mentor is appointed to help teachers improve his/her teaching A development or training plan is established to improve their work as a teacher United States Average
  26. 26. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2626 Feedback and change in behavior Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report a "moderate" or "large" positive change in the following issues after they received feedback on their work 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Confidenceasateacher Motivation Jobsatisfaction Knowledgeandunderstandingofmain subjectfield(s) Teachingpractices Studentassessmentstoimprovestudent learning Classroommanagementpractices Methodsforteachingstudentswithspecial needs Publicrecognition Jobresponsibilities Roleinschooldevelopmentinitiatives Amountofprofessionaldevelopment Likelihoodofcareeradvancement Salaryand/orfinancialbonus Average United States Personal Pedagogical Professional
  27. 27. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 England (UK) Finland Australia Flanders Netherlands Iceland United States Norway Sweden Alberta (Canada) Spain Portugal France Denmark Czech Republic Estonia LatviaAverage Croatia Singapore Korea Israel Serbia Slovak Republic Poland Abu Dhabi (UAE) Japan Brazil Bulgaria Romania Mexico Chile Malaysia Confidence as a teacher Motivation Job satisfaction Knowledge and understanding of main subject field(s) Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2727 Outcomes of teacher feedback - Personal Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report a "moderate" or "large" positive change in the following issues after they received feedback on their work
  28. 28. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2828 Outcomes of teacher feedback - Pedagogical Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report a "moderate" or "large" positive change in the following issues after they received feedback on their work 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 England (UK) Finland Australia Flanders Netherlands Iceland United States Norway Sweden Alberta (Canada) Spain Portugal France Denmark Czech Republic Estonia LatviaAverage Croatia Singapore Korea Israel Serbia Slovak Republic Poland Abu Dhabi (UAE) Japan Brazil Bulgaria Romania Mexico Chile Malaysia Teaching practices Student assessments to improve student learning Classroom management practices Methods for teaching students with special needs Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report a "moderate" or "large" positive change in the following issues after they received feedback on their work
  29. 29. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2929 Outcomes of teacher feedback - Professional Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report a "moderate" or "large" positive change in the following issues after they received feedback on their work 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 England (UK) Finland Australia Flanders Netherlands Iceland United States Norway Sweden Alberta (Canada) Spain Portugal France Denmark Czech Republic Estonia LatviaAverage Croatia Singapore Korea Israel Serbia Slovak Republic Poland Abu Dhabi (UAE) Japan Brazil Bulgaria Romania Mexico Chile Malaysia Public recognition Job responsibilities Role in school development initiatives Amount of professional development Likelihood of career advancement
  30. 30. Teacher Practices and Classroom Environment
  31. 31. 8% 13% 79% 7% 13% 80% United States Administrative tasks Keeping order in the classroom Actual teaching and learning Average proportion of time lower secondary teachers report spending on each of these activities in an average lesson Distribution of class time31 Average
  32. 32. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3232 What teachers do beyond teaching Average number of 60-minute hours teachers report spending on the following tasks in an average week Finland Malaysia Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)Flanders (Belgium) IsraelItaly Malaysia JapanMalaysiaSweden Finland Korea Finland Malaysia Finland Korea Finland Malaysia PortugalSingapore CroatiaFinland Japan 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Number of hours School management Communication with parents All other tasks Extracurricular activities Student counselling Team work Administrative work Marking Planning
  33. 33. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Discussindividual students Shareresources Teamconferences Collaborateforcommon standards Teamteaching CollaborativePD Jointactivities Classroomobservations Percentageofteachers Average United States Professional collaboration Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report doing the following activities at least once per month Teacher co-operation33 Exchange and co-ordination
  34. 34. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Spain Iceland France Brazil Flanders(Belgium) Portugal Finland Croatia Italy Israel Sweden Mexico Chile Alberta(Canada) UnitedStates Norway Denmark Average Australia Malaysia CzechRepublic Bulgaria Estonia Netherlands Serbia SlovakRepublic AbuDhabi(UAE) Singapore England(UK) Poland Romania Latvia Japan Korea Percentageofteachers Never observe other teachers' classes and provide feedback Never teach jointly as a team in the same class Never engage in joint activities across different classes and age groups (e.g. projects) Never take part in collaborative professional learning Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3434 Teacher co-operation: Professional collaboration Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report never doing the following activities
  35. 35. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3535 Teacher co-operation: Exchange and co-ordination Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report never doing the following activities 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Spain Iceland France Brazil Flanders(Belgium) Portugal Finland Croatia Italy Israel Sweden Mexico Chile Alberta(Canada) UnitedStates Norway Denmark Average Australia Malaysia CzechRepublic Bulgaria Estonia Netherlands Serbia SlovakRepublic AbuDhabi(United… Singapore England(United… Poland Romania Latvia Japan Korea Percentageofteachers Never engage in discussions about the learning development of specific students Never exchange teaching materials with colleagues Never work with other teachers in my school to ensure common standards in evaluations for assessing student progress Never attend team conferences
  36. 36. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3636 Teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" that: 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Students learn best by finding solutions to problems on their own Thinking and reasoning processes are more important than specific curriculum content Students should be allowed to think of solutions to practical problems themselves before the teacher shows them how they are solved My role as a teacher is to facilitate students' own inquiry United States Average
  37. 37. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3737 Teaching practices Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report using the following teaching practices "frequently" or "in all or nearly all lessons" 0 20 40 60 80 100 Students work on projects that require at least one week to complete Students use ICT for projects or class work Give different work to the students who have difficulties learning and/or to those who can advance faster Students work in small groups to come up with a joint solution to a problem or task Let students practice similar tasks until teacher knows that every student has understood the subject matter Refer to a problem from everyday life or work to demonstrate why new knowledge is useful Check students' exercise books or homework Present a summary of recently learned content United States Average
  38. 38. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3838 Teaching practices by country Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report using the following teaching practices "frequently" or "in all or nearly all lessons" 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 AbuDhabi(UnitedArabEmirates) Mexico Chile Norway Denmark Australia Alberta(Canada) UnitedStates Brazil England(UnitedKingdom) Sweden Malaysia Average Netherlands SlovakRepublic Portugal Romania Bulgaria Iceland Spain Poland Italy Latvia Singapore CzechRepublic France Estonia Flanders(Belgium) Serbia Israel Korea Finland Croatia Japan Students work in small groups to come up with a joint solution to a problem or task Students work on projects that require at least one week to complete Students use ICT for projects or class work Cumulative percentage of the three teaching practices is above 150%
  39. 39. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3939 Teachers' use of student assessment practices Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report using the following methods of assessing student learning "frequently" or "in all or nearly all lessons" 0 20 40 60 80 100 Let students evaluate their own progress Administer a standardised test Individual students answer questions in front of the class Provide written feedback on student work in addition to a mark Develop and administer own assessment Observe students when working on particular tasks and provide immediate feedback United States Average
  40. 40. Percentage of lower secondary teachers who report using the following methods of assessing student learning "frequently" or "in all or nearly all lessons" Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4040 Reported use of methods of assessing student learning 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Latvia Japan Korea Finland Slovak Republic Czech Republic Romania Estonia Poland Netherlands Serbia Iceland Bulgaria Italy Sweden Denmark FlandersBrazil Malaysia Israel Chile Croatia United States Alberta (Canada) Spain Singapore Mexico France Norway Australia Portugal England (UK) Abu Dhabi Develop and administer own assessment Administer a standardised test Provide written feedback on student work in addition to a mark, i.e. Numeric score or letter grade Observe students when working on particular tasks and provide immediate feedback
  41. 41. Teacher Self- Efficacy and Job Satisfaction
  42. 42. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4242 Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" with the following statements 84 90 91 85 91 89 0 20 40 60 80 100 I would recommend my school as a good place to work I enjoy working at this school All in all, I am satisfied with my job United States Average Teachers' satisfaction with their working environment
  43. 43. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4343 Teachers' satisfaction with their profession Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" with the following statements 78 77 84 87 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 If I could decide again, I would still choose to work as a teacher The advantages of being a teacher clearly outweigh the disadvantages United States Average
  44. 44. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4444 Teachers' satisfaction with their profession Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" with the following statements 9 32 6 34 0 20 40 60 80 100 I regret that I decided to become a teacher I wonder whether it would have been better to choose another profession United States Average
  45. 45. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Malaysia Singapore Korea AbuDhabi(UAE) Finland Mexico Alberta(Canada) Flanders(Belgium) Netherlands Australia England(UK) Romania Israel UnitedStates Chile Average Norway Japan Latvia Serbia Bulgaria Denmark Poland Iceland Estonia Brazil Italy CzechRepublic Portugal Croatia Spain Sweden France SlovakRepublic Percentageofteachers Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4545 Teachers' perceptions of the value of teaching Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" that teaching profession is a valued profession in society Above-average performers in PISA
  46. 46. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4646 Countries where teachers believe their profession is valued show higher levels of student achievement Relationship between lower secondary teachers' views on the value of their profession in society and the country’s share of top mathematics performers in PISA 2012 Australia Brazil Bulgaria Chile Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Latvia Mexico Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Serbia Singapore Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Alberta (Canada) England (UK) Flanders (Belgium) United States 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Shareofmathematicstopperformers Percentage of teachers who agree that teaching is valued in society R2 = 0.24 r= 0.49
  47. 47. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4747 Countries where teachers believe their profession is valued show higher levels of student achievement Relationship between lower secondary teachers' views on the value of their profession in society and the country mean score in mathematics in PISA 2012 Australia Brazil Bulgaria Chile Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Latvia Mexico Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Serbia Singapore Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Alberta (Canada) England (UK) Flanders (Belgium) United States 380 390 400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Mathematicsmeanscore Percentage of teachers who agree that teaching is valued in society R2 = 0.15 r= 0.38
  48. 48. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4848 Relationship between the value of the teaching profession and the share of low mathematics performers Relationship between lower secondary teachers' views on the value of their profession in society and the country’s share of low mathematics performers in PISA 2012 Australia Brazil Bulgaria Chile Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Latvia Mexico Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Serbia Singapore Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Alberta (Canada) England (UK) Flanders (Belgium) United States 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Shareofmathematicslowperformers Percentage of teachers who agree that teaching is valued in society R2 = 0.06 r= 0.23
  49. 49. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 4949 Value of teaching and job satisfaction Australia Brazil Bulgaria Chile Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Iceland Israel Italy Japan Korea Latvia Malaysia Mexico Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Serbia Singapore Slovak Republic Spain Sweden Abu Dhabi (UAE) Alberta (Canada) England (UK) Flanders (Belgium) Average United States 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Allinall,Iamsatisfiedwithmyjob I think that the teaching profession is valued in society Percentage of lower secondary teachers who "agree" or "strongly agree" with the following statements
  50. 50. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 5050 Drivers of job satisfaction The more frequently that teachers report participating in collaborative practices with their colleagues, the higher their level of self-efficacy. The same is true for job satisfaction.
  51. 51. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 5151 Behavioral issues equate to lower job satisfaction, class size doesn’t Teachers' job satisfaction level following the number of students in the classroom in relation to the percentage of students with behavioural problems 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0 12.5 13.0 15orless 16-20 21-25 26-30 31-35 36ormore Teacherjobsatisfaction(level) Class size (number of students) Average United States 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0 12.5 13.0 None 1%to10% 11%to30% 31%ormore Teacherjobsatisfaction(level) Students with behavioural problems Average United States
  52. 52. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 5252 Teachers' job satisfaction and experience Teachers' job satisfaction level in lower secondary according to their total years of teaching experience 11.2 11.4 11.6 11.8 12.0 12.2 12.4 12.6 12.8 5orless 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-25 26-30 31ormore Teacherjobsatisfaction(level) Years of experience as a teacher in total Average United States
  53. 53. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 5353 Teachers' self-efficacy and experience Teachers' self-efficacy level in lower secondary according to their total years of teaching experience 11.6 11.8 12.0 12.2 12.4 12.6 12.8 13.0 13.2 5orless 6-10 11-15 16-20 21-25 26-30 31ormore Teacherself-efficacy(level) Years of experience as a teacher in total Average United States
  54. 54. TALIS is a partnership between Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after acc ounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 5454 TALIS in Brief an international research consortium OECD Governments in 34 countries European Commission Teachers’ unions Find out more about TALIS at www.oecd.org/talis • All national and international publications • The complete micro-level database Email: TALIS@OECD.org Twitter: @Kristen_TALIS

×