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School leadership for
Learning
Insights from TALIS 2013
Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.322 Background: TALI...
TALIS 2013 – 38 systems
*Note: TALIS 2013 only runs in a sub-national entity in the following countries: Belgium (Flemish ...
Leadership for
learning at the
school
Instructional leadership
• Refers to the efforts of the principal in supporting instruction and learning in their school
•...
6
66 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
66
Principals...
7
77 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
77
Engagement...
8
88 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
88
Instructio...
9
99 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
99
Principals...
1
1010 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
1010
Engage...
1
1111 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
1111
Distri...
Profiles of school
leadership across
educational systems
•Strong focus on instructional as well as distributed leadership.
•Spend considerable time on curriculum and teaching rela...
1
1414 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
1414
Percen...
1
1515 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
1515
Countr...
1616 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
1616
Countrie...
Impact of School
leadership
Reflective
dialogue
Teachers
perception
about the
quality of the
feedback
received
Deprivatised
practice
Teachers provide
...
1
1919 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
1919
Depriv...
2
2020 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2020
Associ...
2
2121 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2121
Associ...
2
2222 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2222
Associ...
2
2323 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2323
Associ...
2
2424 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2424 Other ...
Classroom disciplinary climate
Teachers’ description of
student’s behaviour in the
classroom.
Teacher-student relationship...
2
2626 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2626
Classr...
2
2727 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2727
Associ...
2
2828 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2828
Associ...
2
2929 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
2929
Associ...
3
3030 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
3030
Associ...
Discussion
3
3232 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
3232 Contex...
3
3333 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
3333
Contex...
Conclusions
3
3535 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
3535 The im...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
3636 How can syste...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
37 “School leaders...
Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after
accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3
3838 TALIS 2013 pa...
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School Leadership for Learning launch - Presentation by Montserrat Gomendio - 20-09-16

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Presentation by Montserrat Gomendio, Deputy Director of Education and Skills, OECD, for the launch of School Leadership for Learning, organised by The Alliance for Excellent Education and the OECD, 20 September 2016, Washington, DC

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School Leadership for Learning launch - Presentation by Montserrat Gomendio - 20-09-16

  1. 1. 1 School leadership for Learning Insights from TALIS 2013
  2. 2. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.322 Background: TALIS 2013 …representing more than 4 million teachers in over 30 countries and economies… Over 100 thousand randomly selected lower secondary teachers and their school leaders from over 6500 schools …took an internationally-agreed survey about the working conditions and learning environments in their schools… …principals respond to questions about their background, their practices, support and development, their relationships with teachers and other stakeholders and the leadership in their schools
  3. 3. TALIS 2013 – 38 systems *Note: TALIS 2013 only runs in a sub-national entity in the following countries: Belgium (Flemish Community), Canada (Alberta), United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi) and United Kingdom (England). This map is for illustrative purposes and is without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory covered by this map. TALIS 2013 Participants 2014
  4. 4. Leadership for learning at the school
  5. 5. Instructional leadership • Refers to the efforts of the principal in supporting instruction and learning in their school • Index includes the frequency that principals: take action to support co-operation among teacher to develop new teaching practices, take action to ensure that teachers take responsibility for improving their teaching skills, take action to ensure that teachers feel responsible for their student’s learning outcomes. Distributed leadership • Acknowledges the collective effort of improving school quality by taking into account the involvement of other relevant stakeholders. • Index includes the level of principals agreement on whether: the school provides staff with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions, provides parents or guardians with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions, and provides students with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions. 5 55 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 55 Defining instructional and distributed leadership
  6. 6. 6 66 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 66 Principals’ engagement in instructional leadership in lower secondary education. International average compare with the U.S. average 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Take action to support co-operation among teachers to develop new teaching practices Take action to ensure that teachers take responsibility for improving their teaching skills Take action to ensure that teachers feel responsible for their students’ learning outcomes International Average United States Percentage
  7. 7. 7 77 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 77 Engagement in instructional leadership in lower secondary education across TALIS systems 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Malaysia AbuDhabi(UAE) Shanghai(China) Chile Romania Bulgaria Serbia SlovakRepublic Singapore Alberta(Canada) Brazil Mexico Korea Poland Israel RussianFederation Australia Latvia England(UK) Georgia NewZealand CzechRepublic Average Portugal Netherlands Croatia Italy Iceland Spain France Sweden Estonia Norway Denmark Finland Flanders(Belgium) Japan Take action to support co-operation among teachers to develop new teaching practices Take action to ensure that teachers take responsibility for improving their teaching skills Take action to ensure that teachers feel responsible for their students' learning outcomes Cumulativepercentage
  8. 8. 8 88 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 88 Instructional leadership, by principals’ training in instructional leadership in lower secondary education 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 12.0 13.0 Spain Romania Denmark Norway Brazil Mexico Bulgaria CzechRepublic RussianFederation Portugal SlovakRepublic Estonia Finland Average France NewZealand Serbia Croatia Poland Israel Italy Latvia Flanders(Belgium) Australia England(UK) Netherlands Principals received training in instructional leadership Principals received no training in instructional leadership Averagescoreontheinstructionalleadershipscale Notes: The figure includes only those countries and economies in which at least 10% of the principals indicated that they participated in training or a course in instructional leader ship and at least 10% of the principals indicated that they did not participate in such a training or course.
  9. 9. 9 99 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 99 Principals’ engagement in distributed leadership activities in lower secondary education. International average compare with the U.S. average 0 20 40 60 80 100 This school provides staff with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions This school provides parents or guardians with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions This school provides students with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions International Average United States Percentage
  10. 10. 1 1010 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1010 Engagement in distributed leadership in lower secondary education across TALIS systems 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Latvia Shanghai(China) Poland Korea Estonia Georgia Serbia Russian… Norway Flanders… Brazil CzechRepublic Croatia Portugal Alberta(Canada) NewZealand Spain Australia Mexico England(UK) Romania Iceland Average Bulgaria Chile Denmark AbuDhabi(UAE) Netherlands Singapore France Malaysia SlovakRepublic Sweden Finland Italy Israel Japan This school provides students with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions This school provides parents or guardians with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions This school provides staff with opportunities to actively participate in school decisions Cumulativepercentage
  11. 11. 1 1111 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1111 Distributed leadership, by principals’ professional development activities, in lower secondary education -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Netherlands England(UK) Korea Shanghai(China) Mexico Iceland Spain Singapore SlovakRepublic Bulgaria AbuDhabi(UAE) Romania Brazil Serbia Italy Average Denmark Malaysia Finland NewZealand Alberta(Canada) Japan Sweden CzechRepublic Flanders(Belgium) Croatia Estonia Latvia Israel France Australia Portugal RussianFederation Chile Norway Poland Georgia Professional network, mentoring or research activity Courses, conferences or observational visits Other professional development Differenceinscoresonthedistributedleadershipscale
  12. 12. Profiles of school leadership across educational systems
  13. 13. •Strong focus on instructional as well as distributed leadership. •Spend considerable time on curriculum and teaching related tasks in school. •Most use student outcomes to develop the school’s educational goals or programmes and a professional development plan for his/her school. Integrated leaders •Strong focus on distributed leadership, but a weak focus on instructional leadership. •Spend little time on curriculum and teaching related tasks in school. •Some use student outcomes to develop the school’s educational goals or programmes and a professional development plan for his/her school. Inclusive leaders •Strong focus on instructional leadership, but a weak focus on distributed leadership. •Spend much time on curriculum and teaching related tasks in school. •Most use student outcomes to develop the school’s educational goals or programmes and a professional development plan for his/her school. Educational leaders •Weak focus on instructional as well as distributed leadership. •Spends some time on curriculum and teaching-related tasks in school. •Many use student outcomes to develop the school’s educational goals or programmes and a professional development plan for their school. Administrative leaders 1313 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1313 Four types of school leadership
  14. 14. 1 1414 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1414 Percentage of principals in TALIS exercising integrated, inclusive, educational or administrative leadership 50% 17% 23% 10% Integrated leadership Inclusive leadership Educational leadership Administrative leadership
  15. 15. 1 1515 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1515 Countries and economies’ classification according to the overall leadership type of their principals Mainly integrated leaders Mainly inclusive leaders Mainly educational leaders Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) Croatia England (United Kingdom) Alberta (Canada) Denmark Israel Australia Estonia Italy Brazil Finland Japan Bulgaria Flanders (Belgium) New Zealand Chile France Norway Czech Republic Iceland Slovak Republic Georgia Netherlands Korea Portugal Latvia Spain Malaysia Sweden Mexico Poland Romania The Russian Federation Serbia Singapore Shanghai (China)
  16. 16. 1616 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1616 Countries and economies’ classification according to the overall leadership type of their principals (cont.) Japan Finland Flanders (Belgium) Denmark Estonia Sweden France Spain Italy Croatia New Zealand Portugal The Netherlands The Czech Republic Latvia Georgia PolandAustralia Israel Slovak Republic Brazil Russian Federation KoreaAlberta (Canada) Serbia England (UK) Romania Bulgaria Mexico Shanghai (China) Singapore Chile Abu Dhabi (UAE) Malaysia 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0 12.5 13.0 13.5 9.0 10.0 11.0 12.0 13.0 14.0 Degree of distributed leadership Degreeofinstructionalleadership Iceland Countries and economies with mainly integrated leaders Countries and economies with mainly educational leaders Countries and economies with mainly inclusive leaders
  17. 17. Impact of School leadership
  18. 18. Reflective dialogue Teachers perception about the quality of the feedback received Deprivatised practice Teachers provide feedback following direct observation of the classroom teaching of a colleague Collaborative professional activity Teachers report on the frequency with which they engage in sharing materials, discuss and work with colleagues Shared sense of purpose Teachers perception on whether the school has a culture of shared responsibility and mutual support Collective focus on student learning Teachers description on the feedback content (e.g. student performance, behaviour and assessment) 1 1818 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1818 Professional learning communities’ factors
  19. 19. 1 1919 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 1919 Deprivatised practice factor, by country and economy, in lower secondary education 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Korea NewZealand Norway Netherlands England(UK) RussianFederation Australia Denmark Japan Shanghai(China) Latvia Finland Portugal Estonia Singapore Romania Average Italy CzechRepublic Sweden Alberta(Canada) SlovakRepublic Bulgaria Serbia Mexico Spain Brazil Georgia Israel Croatia Iceland Chile Malaysia AbuDhabi(UAE) France Poland Flanders(Belgium) Averagepercentageofteachersreceivingfeedbackfollowing classroomobservationbytheirpeers
  20. 20. 2 2020 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2020 Association between types of leadership and professional learning communities' dimensions, across educational levels Reflective dialogue Deprivatised practice Shared sense of purpose Collaborative activity Collective focus on student learning Instructional leadership + + + + Distributed leadership + Instructional leadership + + Distributed leadership + Instructional leadership + Distributed leadership + Primary education Lower secondary education Upper secondary education Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships.
  21. 21. 2 2121 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2121 Association of integrated leaders and countries with mainly integrated leaders with professional learning communities’ dimensions, in comparison with other types of leadership and country profiles Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships. Reflective dialogue Deprivatised practice Shared sense of purpose Collaborative activity Collective focus on student learning Integrated leaders (ref. category) Educational leaders - - - - Inclusive leaders - - Administrative leaders - - - - Country Profile: Mainly integrated leaders (ref. category) Mainly inclusive leaders - - - Mainly educational leaders
  22. 22. 2 2222 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2222 Association of students’ socio-demographic characteristics with professional learning communities' dimensions, on lower secondary education Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships. Reflective dialogue Deprivatised practice Shared sense of purpose Collaborative activity Collective focus on student learning 0% of students with special needs (ref. category) 1-10% of students + + + 11-30% of students + + + 31-60% of students more than 60% of students + - 0% of low SES students (ref. category) 1-10% of students + 11-30% of students + + 31-60% of students + + more than 60% of students + +
  23. 23. 2 2323 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2323 Association of teachers’ characteristics with professional learning communities' dimensions, on lower secondary education Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships. Reflective dialogue Deprivatised practice Shared sense of purpose Collaborative activity Collective focus on student learning Self-efficacy in the classroom - + - + Self-efficacy instruction + - + + + Self-efficacy in student engagement + - + + +
  24. 24. 2 2424 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2424 Other relevant variables Non-significant, weak or inconsistent associations with professional learning communities were found for the following variables: • School size • School autonomy • School type
  25. 25. Classroom disciplinary climate Teachers’ description of student’s behaviour in the classroom. Teacher-student relationships Teachers’ description on the quality of relation that the teaching staff has with their students. 2 2525 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2525 Learning climate factors
  26. 26. 2 2626 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2626 Classroom disciplinary climate scale, by country and economy, lower secondary education. 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 12.0 13.0 Japan Georgia Shanghai(China) Romania AbuDhabi(UAE) RussianFederation Croatia Serbia Poland Denmark Estonia Italy England(UK) NewZealand Mexico Bulgaria CzechRepublic Israel Average Australia Alberta(Canada) Latvia Norway Sweden Malaysia Flanders(Belgium) Finland Korea France Netherlands SlovakRepublic Iceland Portugal Singapore Spain Chile Brazil Averagescoreontheclassroomdisciplinaryclimatescale
  27. 27. 2 2727 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2727 Association between types of leadership and positive learning environment dimensions, across educational levels Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships. Classroom disciplinary climate Positive teacher- student relationships Instructional leadership Distributed leadership + Instructional leadership Distributed leadership + Instructional leadership Distributed leadership + Lower secondary education Upper secondary education Primary education
  28. 28. 2 2828 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2828 Association of students’ socio-demographic characteristics with learning environment dimensions, lower secondary education Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships. Classroom disciplinary climate Positive teacher-student relationships 0% of students with special needs 1-10% of students - + 11-30% of students - 31-60% of students - more than 60% of students - + 0% of low SES students 1-10% of students 11-30% of students - 31-60% of students - - more than 60% of students - -
  29. 29. 2 2929 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 2929 Association of teachers’ characteristics with learning environment dimensions, lower secondary education Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships. Classroom disciplinary climate Positive teacher-student relationships Self-efficacy in the classroom + + Self-efficacy instruction - + Self-efficacy in student engagement + +
  30. 30. 3 3030 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3030 Association of school’ characteristics with learning environment dimensions, lower secondary education Notes: + = positive effect; - = negative effect Signs in bold font indicate significant effects at p < 0.01; grey signs indicate significant effects at p < 0.05 Results of association are controlled for other school and teacher characteristics that might influence these relationships. Classroom disciplinary climate Positive teacher-student relationships 300- or fewer students 301-600 students - - 601-1200 students - - more than 1200 students - -
  31. 31. Discussion
  32. 32. 3 3232 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3232 Context, School leadership and professional learning communities • The link between principals' leadership and students achievement is rarely direct. • Principals' actions are mediated by a series of school factors which include teacher quality. • Principals' have the means of improving teacher quality through actions such as fostering a professional learning community.
  33. 33. 3 3333 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3333 Context, School leadership and professional learning communities (cont.) • However, the association between leadership, professional learning communities and student achievement should be considered carefully: – In schools with several or many less-competent teachers, actions such as providing feedback, observing each other’s classes or engaging in teacher collaboration may lead to the diffusion or the perpetuation of bad practices. – On the other hand, in schools with a highly qualified teaching workforce, professional learning communities may do very little to improve the practices of an already exceptional workforce, but it can help to sustain their level of excellence. • More research is needed to understand how principals, professional learning communities and student achievement operate in different contexts.
  34. 34. Conclusions
  35. 35. 3 3535 Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3535 The importance of school leadership In this report we were able to show the link between different types of school leadership and professional learning communities. • Distributed leadership Greater sense of purpose in the schools • Instructional leadership Greater levels of collaboration between teachers • Integrated leadership Most favourable approach for PLC • Although a large number of principals demonstrate forms of integrated leadership, some school leaders mainly rely on instructional leadership or distributed leadership. For developing professional learning communities, a integrated role for the school leader seems appropriate.
  36. 36. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3636 How can systems support school leadership? Policies supporting school leadership should consider: • requiring principals to participate in training and in-service professional development instances that include leadership; • guiding principals and teachers in creating a culture of shared responsibility based on collaboration and support; • “freeing” hours of administrative work for principals in order to engage with teachers’ work or assigning a specific staff member to this task; • opening up opportunities for the participation of teachers in school decisions; and • supporting teachers in their professional development needs in order to boost their sense of self-efficacy.
  37. 37. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 37 “School leadership for Learning” authors: • The report has been prepared by researchers from the Groningen Institute for Educational Research (GION): Lyset Rekers-Mombarg Marij Veldman Ralf Maslowski Under the oversight of the OECD Secretariat Roel Bosker
  38. 38. Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic status Fig II.3.3 3838 TALIS 2013 partnership TALIS is a partnership between an international research consortium Governments in 38 countries and economies European Commission Teachers’ unions

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