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Approach to common
Breast complaints
Nizar Al-Abbadi 1430498
Mohammed Dakhil
1339856
B4
Breast Cancer
• Breast cancer is the most common site-specific cancer in women and is
the leading cause of death from cancer for women aged 20 to 59 years. It
accounts for 29% of all newly diagnosed cancers in females and is
responsible for 14% of the cancer-related deaths in women.
• The increase in breast cancer incidence occurred primarily in women 55
years and paralleled a marked increase in the percentage of older women
who had mammograms taken
• Primary Breast Cancer.
• More than 80% of breast cancers show productive fibrosis that involves the
epithelial and stromal tissues. With growth of the cancer and invasion of the
surrounding breast tissues, the accompanying desmoplastic response entraps
and shortens Cooper’s suspensory ligaments to produce a characteristic skin
retraction. Localized edema (peaud’orange) develops when drainage of lymph
fluid from the skin is disrupted. With continued growth, cancer cells invade the
skin, and eventually ulceration occurs.
• As the size of the primary breast cancer increases, some cancer cells are shed
into cellular spaces and transported via the lymphatic network of the breast to
the regional lymph nodes, especially the axillary lymph nodes. Lymph nodes that
contain metastatic cancer are at first ill-defined and soft but become firm or hard
with continued growth of the metastatic cancer. Eventually the lymph nodes
adhere to each other and form a conglomerate mass.
Lobular Carcinoma In Situ
• LCIS originates from the terminal duct lobular units and develops only in the female breast.
• it usually presents as an incidental finding
• LCIS has a distinct racial predilection, occurring 12 times more frequently in white women compared
to African American.
• Invasive breast cancer develops in 25% to 35% of women with LCIS
• 65% of subsequent invasive cancers are ductal, not lobular, in origin. For these reasons, LCIS is
regarded as a marker of increased risk for invasive breast cancer rather than as an anatomic precursor.
Ductal Carcinoma In
Situ
• Malignant proliferation of epithelial cells confined to
ductal-lobular system
• Although DCIS is predominantly seen in the female
breast, it accounts for 5% of male breast cancers.
• Characterized by a proliferation of the epithelium
that lines the minor ducts, resulting in papillary
growths within the duct lumina
• DCIS is generally asymptomatic, appearing as a
mammogram finding, sometimes with
microcalcification
• Considered as a non-obligate precursor for invasive
carcinoma
• Recurrence / invasive cancer progression in 
• Young age
• Large size – High grade
• Comedo
• Positive margins
Invasive Breast Carcinoma
invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type (NST).
1. Paget’s disease of the nipple
2. Invasive ductal carcinoma—Adenocarcinoma with productive fibrosis
(scirrhous, simplex, NST), 80%
3. Medullary carcinoma, 4%
4. Mucinous (colloid) carcinoma, 2%
5. Papillary carcinoma, 2%
6. Tubular carcinoma, 2%
7. Invasive lobular carcinoma, 10%
8. Rare cancers (adenoid cystic, squamous cell, apocrine)
Paget’s disease
• It frequently presents as a chronic, eczematous eruption of the nipple, which may be subtle but may
progress to an ulcerated, weeping lesion.
• Paget’s disease usually is associated with extensive DCIS and may be associated with an invasive
cancer.
• A palpable mass may or may not be present. A nipple biopsy specimen will show a population of cells
that are identical to the underlying DCIS cells (pagetoid features or pagetoid change).
• Pathognomonic of this cancer is the presence of large, pale, vacuolated cells (Paget cells) in the rete
pegs of the epithelium.
• Paget’s disease may be confused with superficial spreading melanoma. Differentiation from pagetoid
intraepithelial melanoma is based on the presence of S-100 antigen immunostaining in melanoma and
carcinoembryonic antigen immunostaining in Paget’s disease.
• Surgical therapy for Paget’s disease may involve lumpectomy or mastectomy, depending on the extent
of involvement of the nipple-areolar complex and the presence of DCIS or invasive cancer in the
underlying breast parenchyma
Invasive ductal
carcinoma of the breast
• accounts for 80% of breast cancers and
presents with macroscopic or microscopic
axillary lymph node metastases in up to 25%
of screen-detected casesvand up to 60% of
symptomatic cases.
• This cancer occurs most frequently in
perimenopausal or postmenopausal women
in the fifth to sixth decades of life as a solitary,
firm mass.
• It has poorly defined margins and its cut
surfaces show a central stellate configuration
with chalky white or yellow streaks extending
into surrounding breast tissues.
• 75% of ductal cancers showed estrogen
receptor expression.132
Invasive lobular
carcinoma
• Accounts for 10% of breast cancers.
• The histopathologic features of this cancer include
small cells with rounded nuclei and scant cytoplasm
• Special stains may confirm the presence of
intracytoplasmic mucin, which may displace the
nucleus (signet-ring cell carcinoma).
• At presentation, invasive lobular carcinoma varies
from clinically inapparent carcinomas to those that
replace the entire breast with a poorly defined mass.
• It is frequently multifocal, multicentric, and bilateral.
Because of its insidious growth pattern and subtle
mammographic features.
• Over 90% of lobular cancers express estrogen
receptor
BREAST CANCER
THERAPY
• Before diagnostic biopsy, the surgeon must
consider the possibility that a suspicious mass
or mammographic finding may be a breast
cancer.
• Once a diagnosis of breast cancer is made,
the type of therapy offered to a breast cancer
patient is determined by
• The stage of the disease
• The biologic subtype
• The general health status of the individual
In Situ Breast Cancer (Stage 0)
• 1 - LCIS
• the current treatment include observation, chemoprevention, and bilateral total mastectomy.
• The goal of treatment is to prevent or detect at an early stage the invasive cancer that subsequently develops in
25% to 35% of these women.
• There is no benefit to excising LCIS, because the disease diffusely involves both breasts in many cases and the risk
of developing invasive cancer is equal for both breasts.
• The use of tamoxifen as a risk reduction strategy should be considered in women with a diagnosis of LCIS.
2.DCIS
• Women with DCIS and evidence of extensive disease (>4 cm of disease or disease in more than one
quadrant) usually require mastectomy .
• For women with limited disease, lumpectomy and radiation therapy are generally recommended.
• For nonpalpable DCIS, needle localization or other mage-guided techniques are used to guide the surgical
resection. Specimen mammography is performed to ensure that all visible evidence of cancer is excised.
• Adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is considered for DCIS patients with ER-positive disease for 5 years after
surgery.
• Patients were randomly assigned to lumpectomy with radiation or lumpectomy alone and after a mean
follow-up time of 90 months, rates of both ipsilateral noninvasive and invasive recurrences were
significantly lower in patients who received radiation.(NSABP to assess the need for radiation in patients
treated with breast conserving surgery for DCIS)
Predictors of local
relapse
• Age < 50 years.
• Strong FH
• Size > 3 cm
• High nuclear grade
• Comedo necrosis
• Positive margins
Early Invasive Breast Cancer (Stage I, IIA,
or IIB)• There have been six prospective randomized trials comparing breast conserving surgery to
mastectomy in early stage breast cancer and all have shown equivalent survival rates regardless of
the surgical treatment type.
• One caveat however is that the majority of studies had a restriction of tumor size; most were either
2 cm or 2.5 cm while the NSABP B-06 trial was 4 cm and the NCI trial was up to 5 cm. NSABP B-
06, which is the largest of all the breast conservation trials, compared total mastectomy to
lumpectomy with or without radiation therapy in the treatment of women with stage I and II breast
cancer.
• After 5- and 8-year follow-up periods, the disease-free (DFS), distant disease-free, and overall
survival (OS) rates for lumpectomy with or without radiation therapy were similar to those observed
after total mastectomy.
• However, the incidence of ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence was higher in the group not
receiving radiation therapy. These findings supported the use of lumpectomy and radiation therapy
in the treatment of stage I and II breast cancer and this has since become the preferred method of
treatment for women with early stage breast cancer who have unifocal disease and who are not
• Currently, mastectomy with axillary staging and breast conserving surgery with axillary staging and
radiation therapy are considered equivalent treatments for patients with stage I and II breast
cancer.
• Breast conservation is considered for all patients because of the important cosmetic advantages
and equivalent survival Outcomes.
• Relative contraindications to breast conservation therapy include
1. prior radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall
2. persistently positive surgical margins after reexcision
3. multicentric disease
4. scleroderma or lupus erythematosus.
• For most patients with early-stage disease, reconstruction can be performed immediately at the
time of mastectomy.
• Immediate reconstruction allows for skin-sparing, thus optimizing cosmetic outcomes. Skin-sparing
mastectomy with immediate reconstruction has been popularized over the past decade as reports
of low local-regional failure rates have been reported and reconstructive techniques have
advanced.
• There is a growing interest in the use of nipple-areolar sparing mastectomy although few reports
on the long-term safety of this approach are available at this time.
• Patients who are planned for postmastectomy radiation therapy are not ideal candidates for nipple-
sparing mastectomy because of the effects of radiation on the preserved nipple.
• In addition to providing optimal cosmesis from preservation of the skin and/or the nipple-areolar
complex, immediate reconstruction allows patients to wake up with a breast mound which provides
some psychological benefit for the patient.
• Immediate reconstruction is also more economical as both the extirpative and reconstructive
surgery are combined in one operation.
• Immediate reconstruction can be performed using implants or autologous tissue;
Advanced Local-Regional Breast Cancer (Stage IIIA
or IIIB)
• In an effort to provide optimal local-regional disease-free survival as well as distant disease free
survival for these women, surgery is integrated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy
• Neoadjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in the initial management of patients with locally
advanced stage III breast cancer, especially those with estrogen receptor negative tumors
• Surgical therapy for women with stage III disease is usually a modified radical mastectomy,
followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Chemotherapy is used to maximize distant disease-free
survival, whereas radiation therapy is used to maximize local-regional control and disease-free
survival.
• In selected patients with stage IIIA cancer, preoperative chemotherapy can reduce the size of the
primary cancer and permit breast-conserving surgery
• For patients with stage IIIA disease who experience minimal response to chemotherapy and for
patients with stage IIIB breast cancer, preoperative chemotherapy can decrease the local-regional
cancer burden enough to permit subsequent modified radical mastectomy to establish local-
regional control
Distant Metastases (Stage IV)
• Treatment for stage IV breast cancer is not curative but may prolong
survival and enhance a woman’s quality of life.
• Endocrine therapies that are associated with minimal toxicity are
preferred to cytotoxic chemotherapy in estrogen receptor positive disease
• Systemic chemotherapy is indicated for women with hormone receptor-negative cancers, ‘visceral
crisis’, and hormone-refractory metastases
• Bisphosphonates, which may be given in addition to chemotherapy or endocrine therapy, should
be considered in women with bone metastases
Breast Cancer Prognosis
• The overall 5-year relative survival for breast cancer patients from the time
period of
• 2003–2009 from 18 SEER geographic areas was 89.2%.
• The 5-year relative survival by race was reported to be 90.4% for White women
and 78.7% for black women.
• The 5-year survival rate for patients with localized disease (61% of patients) is
98.6%; for patients with regional disease (32% of patients), 84.4%; and for
patients with distant metastatic disease (5% of patients), 24.3%.
Treatment
selection
• The type of breast cancer
• The stage and grade of the breast cancer - how
large the tumor is, whether or not it has spread
• Whether or not the cancer cells are sensitive to
hormones
• The patient's overall health
• The age of the patient
• The patient's own preferences
Staging of
breast cancer
The TNM staging system
• This system takes into account:
• the tumor size and spread (T),
• whether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes
(N) and
• whether it has spread to distant organs (M) for
metastasis
• Stage 0 cancer means that the cancer is limited to the inside of the milk duct and is a
non-invasive cancer. The treatment approaches for these non-invasive breast tumors are
often different from the treatment of invasive breast cancer. Stage 0 breast tumors
include ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) used to be
categorized as Stage 0 but this has been changed, because it is not cancer, but does
indicate a higher risk of breast cancer
• Stage I: These breast cancers are still relatively small and either have not spread to the
lymph nodes or have only a tiny area of cancer spread in the sentinel lymph node (the
first lymph node to which cancer is likely to spread).
• Stage II: These breast cancers are larger than stage I cancers and/or have spread to a few
nearby lymph nodes.
The TNM staging system
The TNM staging system
• Stage III: These tumors are larger or are growing into nearby tissues (the skin over the
breast or the muscle underneath), or they have spread to many nearby lymph nodes.
• Stage IV cancers have spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes to other parts
of the body. Treatment for stage IV breast cancer is usually a systemic (drug) therapy.
• Recurrent breast cancer : Cancer is called recurrent when it comes back after treatment .
Recurrence can be local (in the same breast or in the surgery scar), regional (in nearby
lymph nodes), or in a distant area. Treatment for recurrent breast cancer depends on
where the cancer recurs and what treatments you’ve had before.
• Triple-negative breast cancer cells don’t have estrogen or progesterone receptors
and also don’t have too much of the protein. HER2 Triple-negative breast cancers
grow and spread faster than most other types of breast cancer. Because the
cancer cells don’t have hormone receptors, hormone therapy is not helpful in
treating these cancers. And because they don’t have much HER2, drugs that
target HER2 aren’t helpful, either. Chemotherapy is usually the standard
treatment.
Treatment
options
• Surgery
• Radiation therapy
• systemic therapy
• Lumpectomy
• Mastectomy
• Lymph node dissection
• breast reconstruction
• External beam (3D
conformal , IMRT)
• Brachytherapy (High
dose[HDR] or low dose
[LDR])
• Intraoperative radiation
(IORT)
• Chemotherapy
• Hormonal therapy
• Targeted Drug therapy
Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy)
• (also called a quadrantectomy, partial mastectomy, or segmental mastectomy)
• A surgeryin which only the part of the breast containing the cancer is removed.
• The goal is to remove the cancer as well as some surrounding normal tissue. How much of the breast is
removed depends on the size and location of the tumor and other factors.
• but makes it likely she will also need radiation.
Who can get breast-conserving surgery?
• Are very concerned about losing her breast
• Are willing to have radiation therapy
• Have not already had her breast treated with radiation therapy or BCS Have only one area of cancer on the
breast, or multiple areas that are close enough to be removed together without changing the look of the
breast too much
• Have a small tumor (5 cm [2 inches] or smaller)
• Are not pregnant or, if pregnant, will not need radiation therapy immediately (to avoid risking harm to the
fetus)
• Do not have a genetic factor such as a BRCA mutation, which might increase chance of a second cancer
• Do not have certain serious connective tissue diseases such as scleroderma or lupus, which may make you
especially sensitive to the side effects of radiation therapy
• Do not have inflammatory breast cancer
Choosing between breast-conserving surgery
and mastectomy
• Many women with early-stage cancers can choose between breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and
mastectomy.
• The main advantage of BCS is that a woman keeps most of her breast.
• But in most cases she will also need radiation.
• Women who have mastectomy for early stage cancers are less likely to need radiation. For some
women, mastectomy may be a better option, because of the type of breast cancer, the large size
of the tumor, previous treatment history, or certain other factors. Some women might be worried
that having a less extensive surgery might raise their risk of the cancer coming back. But the fact
is, in most cases, mastectomy does not give you any better chance of long-term survival or a
better outcome from treatment. Studies following thousands of women for more than 20 years
show that when BCS can be done along with radiation, having a mastectomy instead does not
provide any better chance of survival.
Side effects of breast-conserving surgery :
• Pain or tenderness or a "tugging" sensation in the breast
• Temporary swelling
• Hard scar tissue that forms in the surgical site
• Change in the shape of the breast Nerve (neuropathic) pain (sometimes
described as burning or shooting pain) in the chest wall, armpit, and/or arm that
doesn’t go away over time.
• This can also happen in mastectomy patients and is called post-mastectomy pain
syndrome or PMPS.
Mastectomy
• A surgery in which the entire breast is removed, including all of the breast tissue
and sometimes other nearby tissues
• It’s often done when a woman cannot be treated with breast-conserving surgery
(lumpectomy), which spares most of the breast.
• It can also be done if a woman chooses mastectomy over breast-conserving
surgery for personal reasons.
• Women at very high risk of getting a second cancer sometimes have a double
mastectomy, the removal of both breasts
Types of mastectomies
• Simple (or total)
mastectomy In this
procedure, the surgeon
removes the entire
breast, including the
nipple, areola, and skin.
Some underarm lymph
nodes may or may not
be removed depending
on the situation. Most
women, if they are
hospitalized, can go
home the next day.
• Skin-sparing
mastectomy
• most of the skin over
the breast is left
intact. Only the
breast tissue, nipple
and areola are
removed.
• Nipple-sparing
mastectomy
• a variation of the
skin-sparing
mastectomy. In this
procedure, the breast
tissue is removed, but
the breast skin and
nipple are left in
place.
Modified radical mastectomy
• A modified radical
mastectomy
combines a simple
mastectomy with the
removal of the lymph
nodes under the arm
(called an axillary
lymph node
dissection).
• Radical mastectomy
In this extensive
operation, the
surgeon removes the
entire breast, axillary
(underarm) lymph
nodes, and the
pectoral(chest wall)
muscles under the
breast.
• Double mastectomy
• If a mastectomy is
done on both breasts,
it is called a double
• it is often a risk-
reducing surgery for
women at very high
risk for getting breast
cancer, such as those
with a BRCA gene
mutation.
Mastectomy might be recommended if
• Are unable to have radiation therapy
• Would prefer a more extensive surgery instead of having radiation therapy
• recurrence tumor post BCS
• Multiple tumor in the same breast
• Have a larger tumor (greater than 5 cm [2 inches] across), or a tumor that is large relative to your breast size
• Are pregnant and would need radiation therapy while still pregnant (risking harm to the fetus)
• Have a genetic factor such as a BRCA mutation, which might increase your chance of a second cancer
• Have a serious connective tissue disease such as scleroderma or lupus, which may make you especially sensitive to
the side effects of radiation therapy
• Have inflammatory breast cancer
Lymph Node Surgery for Breast Cancer
• Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB)
• the surgeon finds and removes the first lymph node(s) to which a tumor is likely to spread
• the surgeon injects a radioactive substance and/or a blue dye into the tumor
• Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND)
• about 10 to 40 lymph nodes are removed
• Usually done at the same time as the mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery
• Side effects :
• Lymphedema This is less common after (SLNB) than (ALND).
• Limited arm and shoulder movement is more common after ALND than SLNB
• Numbness of the skin on the upper arm
Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND)
Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB)
Adjuvant and neo-adjuvant therapy
• Adjuvant systemic therapy: After surgery , Combat metastasis Chemotherapy and
hormone therapy .
• All node-positive patients should receive adjuvant chemotherapy
• Neo-adjuvant therapy Before surgery , Reduce tumors Radiation therapy
• But this doesn’t improve survival more than getting these treatments after
surgery.
• Patients with ER-positive tumors receive adjuvant hormonal therapy for 5 years.
Tamoxifen is given to premenopausal women, and
• aromatase inhibitors are given to postmenopausal women.
Radiation therapy
• Indications for adjuvant radiation
• After mastectomy include T3 and T4 tumors attachment to the pectoral fascia, positive
surgical margins, skin involvement, involved internal mammary nodes, inadequate or no
axillary dissection, four or more positive lymph nodes, and residual tumor on the axillary
vein.
• Presence of one to three positive axillary nodes is a relative indication.
• Adjuvant whole-breast radiation after BCT decreases the breast cancer recurrence rate
from 30% to less than 7% at 5 years.
• significantly decreased recurrence and improved survival in premenopausal women with
these indications treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy
external beam Radiation therapy
• External beam radiation is the most common type of radiation therapy
• Breast radiation therapy – applied after a lumpectomy
• Chest wall radiation therapy – applied after a mastectomy the mastectomy scar, and the places where any drains
exited the body after surgery
• Breast boost - a high-dose of radiation therapy is applied to where the tumor was surgically removed
• If cancer was found in the lymph nodes under the arm (axillary lymph nodes), this area may be given radiation, as
well
• Complications. Radiation to the chest wall can cause skin changes.
• Infrequent complications include interstitial pneumonitis, spontaneous rib fracture, breast fibrosis, pericarditis,
pleural effusion, and chest wall myositis. Radiation to the axilla can increase the incidence of lymphedema and
axillary fibrosis.
• Angiosarcoma can occur as a late
Brachytherapy
• also known as internal radiation, is another way to deliver radiation therapy.
Instead of aiming radiation beams from outside the body, a device containing
radioactive seeds or pellets is placed into the breast tissue for a short time in the
area where the cancer had been removed.
• For women who had (BCS), brachytherapy can be used along with external beam
radiation as a way to add an extra boost of radiation to the tumor site.
• Tumor size, location, and other factors may limit who can get brachytherapy.
Types of brachytherapy
• Interstitial brachytherapy: In this approach, several
small catheters are inserted into the breast around the
area where the cancer was removed and are left in
place for several days.
• it is not used as much anymore
• Intracavitary brachytherapy This is the most common
type of brachytherapy for women with breast cancer. A
device is put into the space left from BCS and is left in
place until treatment is complete. There are several
different devices available most of which require
surgical training for proper placement
Chemotherapy
• anti-cancer drugs that may be given IV or by mouth.
• adjuvant chemotherapy : Adjuvant chemo is used to try to kill any cancer cells that might
have been left behind or have spread but can't be seen
• neoadjuvant chemotherapy can be used to try to shrink the tumor so it can be removed
with less extensive surgery
• For advanced breast cancer be used as the main treatment for women whose cancer has
spread outside the breast and underarm area
• cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) will achieve a 25 per cent
reduction in the risk of relapse over a 10- to 15-year period.
• Newer ‘biological’ agents will be used more frequently as molecular targets are identified
– the first of these, trastuzamab (Herceptin), is active against tumours containing the
growth factor receptor c-erbB2. Other agents currently available include bevacizumab, a
vascular growth factor receptor inhibitor, and lapitinab .
Side effect
• The side effects of chemo depend on:
• the type of drugs used
• the amount given
• and the length of treatment
• Short – term side effects · Hair loss · Loss of appetite or increased appetite · Nausea and
vomiting · A higher risk of infection · Stopping of menstrual periods · Easy bruising or
bleeding · Being very tired
• Long - term side effects
• Menstrual changes: infertility
• Nerve damage: pain, burning or tingling and sensitivity to cold or hot.
• Heart damage
Hormone therapy
• Some types of breast cancer are affected by hormones in the blood. ER-positive and PR-positive
breast cancer1 cells have receptors (proteins) that attach to estrogen
• adjuvant therapy VS neoadjuvant therapy
• These drugs work by stopping estrogen from stimulating breast cancer cells to grow.
• Tamoxifen has been the most widely used ‘hormonal’ treatment in breast cancer it has now been
shown to reduce the annual rate of recurrence by 25 per cent, with a 17 per cent reduction in the
annual rate of death
• It is usually taken for at least 5 years
• Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs which induce a reversible ovarian
suppression and thus have the same beneficial effects as surgical or radiation-induced ovarian
ablation in premenopausal receptor-positive women
Hormone therapy
• the oral aromatase inhibitors (AIs) for postmenopausal women The latter group of
compounds are now licensed for treatment of recurrent disease, in which they have
been shown to be superior to tamoxifen. anastrazole to tamoxifen in the adjuvant setting
has shown a beneficial effect for the aromatase inhibitor in terms of relapse-free
survival, although no benefit for overall survival. There is an additional reduction in
contralateral disease, which makes this drug suitable for a study of prevention, and the
side-effect profile is different from that of tamoxifen. The AIs have been more expensive
than tamoxifen but are all coming off patent protection and generic copies may allow
more widespread use. There is an increase in bone density loss with patients on an AI
and a bone density scan is advised prior to commencement with treatment of underlying
osteopenia or osteporosis.

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breast cancer

  • 1. Approach to common Breast complaints Nizar Al-Abbadi 1430498 Mohammed Dakhil 1339856 B4
  • 2. Breast Cancer • Breast cancer is the most common site-specific cancer in women and is the leading cause of death from cancer for women aged 20 to 59 years. It accounts for 29% of all newly diagnosed cancers in females and is responsible for 14% of the cancer-related deaths in women. • The increase in breast cancer incidence occurred primarily in women 55 years and paralleled a marked increase in the percentage of older women who had mammograms taken
  • 3.
  • 4.
  • 5.
  • 6. • Primary Breast Cancer. • More than 80% of breast cancers show productive fibrosis that involves the epithelial and stromal tissues. With growth of the cancer and invasion of the surrounding breast tissues, the accompanying desmoplastic response entraps and shortens Cooper’s suspensory ligaments to produce a characteristic skin retraction. Localized edema (peaud’orange) develops when drainage of lymph fluid from the skin is disrupted. With continued growth, cancer cells invade the skin, and eventually ulceration occurs. • As the size of the primary breast cancer increases, some cancer cells are shed into cellular spaces and transported via the lymphatic network of the breast to the regional lymph nodes, especially the axillary lymph nodes. Lymph nodes that contain metastatic cancer are at first ill-defined and soft but become firm or hard with continued growth of the metastatic cancer. Eventually the lymph nodes adhere to each other and form a conglomerate mass.
  • 7. Lobular Carcinoma In Situ • LCIS originates from the terminal duct lobular units and develops only in the female breast. • it usually presents as an incidental finding • LCIS has a distinct racial predilection, occurring 12 times more frequently in white women compared to African American. • Invasive breast cancer develops in 25% to 35% of women with LCIS • 65% of subsequent invasive cancers are ductal, not lobular, in origin. For these reasons, LCIS is regarded as a marker of increased risk for invasive breast cancer rather than as an anatomic precursor.
  • 8. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ • Malignant proliferation of epithelial cells confined to ductal-lobular system • Although DCIS is predominantly seen in the female breast, it accounts for 5% of male breast cancers. • Characterized by a proliferation of the epithelium that lines the minor ducts, resulting in papillary growths within the duct lumina • DCIS is generally asymptomatic, appearing as a mammogram finding, sometimes with microcalcification • Considered as a non-obligate precursor for invasive carcinoma
  • 9. • Recurrence / invasive cancer progression in  • Young age • Large size – High grade • Comedo • Positive margins
  • 10.
  • 11.
  • 12.
  • 13. Invasive Breast Carcinoma invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type (NST). 1. Paget’s disease of the nipple 2. Invasive ductal carcinoma—Adenocarcinoma with productive fibrosis (scirrhous, simplex, NST), 80% 3. Medullary carcinoma, 4% 4. Mucinous (colloid) carcinoma, 2% 5. Papillary carcinoma, 2% 6. Tubular carcinoma, 2% 7. Invasive lobular carcinoma, 10% 8. Rare cancers (adenoid cystic, squamous cell, apocrine)
  • 14. Paget’s disease • It frequently presents as a chronic, eczematous eruption of the nipple, which may be subtle but may progress to an ulcerated, weeping lesion. • Paget’s disease usually is associated with extensive DCIS and may be associated with an invasive cancer. • A palpable mass may or may not be present. A nipple biopsy specimen will show a population of cells that are identical to the underlying DCIS cells (pagetoid features or pagetoid change). • Pathognomonic of this cancer is the presence of large, pale, vacuolated cells (Paget cells) in the rete pegs of the epithelium. • Paget’s disease may be confused with superficial spreading melanoma. Differentiation from pagetoid intraepithelial melanoma is based on the presence of S-100 antigen immunostaining in melanoma and carcinoembryonic antigen immunostaining in Paget’s disease. • Surgical therapy for Paget’s disease may involve lumpectomy or mastectomy, depending on the extent of involvement of the nipple-areolar complex and the presence of DCIS or invasive cancer in the underlying breast parenchyma
  • 15.
  • 16. Invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast • accounts for 80% of breast cancers and presents with macroscopic or microscopic axillary lymph node metastases in up to 25% of screen-detected casesvand up to 60% of symptomatic cases. • This cancer occurs most frequently in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women in the fifth to sixth decades of life as a solitary, firm mass. • It has poorly defined margins and its cut surfaces show a central stellate configuration with chalky white or yellow streaks extending into surrounding breast tissues. • 75% of ductal cancers showed estrogen receptor expression.132
  • 17. Invasive lobular carcinoma • Accounts for 10% of breast cancers. • The histopathologic features of this cancer include small cells with rounded nuclei and scant cytoplasm • Special stains may confirm the presence of intracytoplasmic mucin, which may displace the nucleus (signet-ring cell carcinoma). • At presentation, invasive lobular carcinoma varies from clinically inapparent carcinomas to those that replace the entire breast with a poorly defined mass. • It is frequently multifocal, multicentric, and bilateral. Because of its insidious growth pattern and subtle mammographic features. • Over 90% of lobular cancers express estrogen receptor
  • 18. BREAST CANCER THERAPY • Before diagnostic biopsy, the surgeon must consider the possibility that a suspicious mass or mammographic finding may be a breast cancer. • Once a diagnosis of breast cancer is made, the type of therapy offered to a breast cancer patient is determined by • The stage of the disease • The biologic subtype • The general health status of the individual
  • 19. In Situ Breast Cancer (Stage 0) • 1 - LCIS • the current treatment include observation, chemoprevention, and bilateral total mastectomy. • The goal of treatment is to prevent or detect at an early stage the invasive cancer that subsequently develops in 25% to 35% of these women. • There is no benefit to excising LCIS, because the disease diffusely involves both breasts in many cases and the risk of developing invasive cancer is equal for both breasts. • The use of tamoxifen as a risk reduction strategy should be considered in women with a diagnosis of LCIS.
  • 20. 2.DCIS • Women with DCIS and evidence of extensive disease (>4 cm of disease or disease in more than one quadrant) usually require mastectomy . • For women with limited disease, lumpectomy and radiation therapy are generally recommended. • For nonpalpable DCIS, needle localization or other mage-guided techniques are used to guide the surgical resection. Specimen mammography is performed to ensure that all visible evidence of cancer is excised. • Adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is considered for DCIS patients with ER-positive disease for 5 years after surgery. • Patients were randomly assigned to lumpectomy with radiation or lumpectomy alone and after a mean follow-up time of 90 months, rates of both ipsilateral noninvasive and invasive recurrences were significantly lower in patients who received radiation.(NSABP to assess the need for radiation in patients treated with breast conserving surgery for DCIS)
  • 21. Predictors of local relapse • Age < 50 years. • Strong FH • Size > 3 cm • High nuclear grade • Comedo necrosis • Positive margins
  • 22. Early Invasive Breast Cancer (Stage I, IIA, or IIB)• There have been six prospective randomized trials comparing breast conserving surgery to mastectomy in early stage breast cancer and all have shown equivalent survival rates regardless of the surgical treatment type. • One caveat however is that the majority of studies had a restriction of tumor size; most were either 2 cm or 2.5 cm while the NSABP B-06 trial was 4 cm and the NCI trial was up to 5 cm. NSABP B- 06, which is the largest of all the breast conservation trials, compared total mastectomy to lumpectomy with or without radiation therapy in the treatment of women with stage I and II breast cancer. • After 5- and 8-year follow-up periods, the disease-free (DFS), distant disease-free, and overall survival (OS) rates for lumpectomy with or without radiation therapy were similar to those observed after total mastectomy. • However, the incidence of ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence was higher in the group not receiving radiation therapy. These findings supported the use of lumpectomy and radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and II breast cancer and this has since become the preferred method of treatment for women with early stage breast cancer who have unifocal disease and who are not
  • 23. • Currently, mastectomy with axillary staging and breast conserving surgery with axillary staging and radiation therapy are considered equivalent treatments for patients with stage I and II breast cancer. • Breast conservation is considered for all patients because of the important cosmetic advantages and equivalent survival Outcomes. • Relative contraindications to breast conservation therapy include 1. prior radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall 2. persistently positive surgical margins after reexcision 3. multicentric disease 4. scleroderma or lupus erythematosus.
  • 24. • For most patients with early-stage disease, reconstruction can be performed immediately at the time of mastectomy. • Immediate reconstruction allows for skin-sparing, thus optimizing cosmetic outcomes. Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate reconstruction has been popularized over the past decade as reports of low local-regional failure rates have been reported and reconstructive techniques have advanced. • There is a growing interest in the use of nipple-areolar sparing mastectomy although few reports on the long-term safety of this approach are available at this time. • Patients who are planned for postmastectomy radiation therapy are not ideal candidates for nipple- sparing mastectomy because of the effects of radiation on the preserved nipple. • In addition to providing optimal cosmesis from preservation of the skin and/or the nipple-areolar complex, immediate reconstruction allows patients to wake up with a breast mound which provides some psychological benefit for the patient. • Immediate reconstruction is also more economical as both the extirpative and reconstructive surgery are combined in one operation. • Immediate reconstruction can be performed using implants or autologous tissue;
  • 25. Advanced Local-Regional Breast Cancer (Stage IIIA or IIIB) • In an effort to provide optimal local-regional disease-free survival as well as distant disease free survival for these women, surgery is integrated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in the initial management of patients with locally advanced stage III breast cancer, especially those with estrogen receptor negative tumors • Surgical therapy for women with stage III disease is usually a modified radical mastectomy, followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Chemotherapy is used to maximize distant disease-free survival, whereas radiation therapy is used to maximize local-regional control and disease-free survival. • In selected patients with stage IIIA cancer, preoperative chemotherapy can reduce the size of the primary cancer and permit breast-conserving surgery • For patients with stage IIIA disease who experience minimal response to chemotherapy and for patients with stage IIIB breast cancer, preoperative chemotherapy can decrease the local-regional cancer burden enough to permit subsequent modified radical mastectomy to establish local- regional control
  • 26.
  • 27. Distant Metastases (Stage IV) • Treatment for stage IV breast cancer is not curative but may prolong survival and enhance a woman’s quality of life. • Endocrine therapies that are associated with minimal toxicity are preferred to cytotoxic chemotherapy in estrogen receptor positive disease • Systemic chemotherapy is indicated for women with hormone receptor-negative cancers, ‘visceral crisis’, and hormone-refractory metastases • Bisphosphonates, which may be given in addition to chemotherapy or endocrine therapy, should be considered in women with bone metastases
  • 28. Breast Cancer Prognosis • The overall 5-year relative survival for breast cancer patients from the time period of • 2003–2009 from 18 SEER geographic areas was 89.2%. • The 5-year relative survival by race was reported to be 90.4% for White women and 78.7% for black women. • The 5-year survival rate for patients with localized disease (61% of patients) is 98.6%; for patients with regional disease (32% of patients), 84.4%; and for patients with distant metastatic disease (5% of patients), 24.3%.
  • 29. Treatment selection • The type of breast cancer • The stage and grade of the breast cancer - how large the tumor is, whether or not it has spread • Whether or not the cancer cells are sensitive to hormones • The patient's overall health • The age of the patient • The patient's own preferences
  • 30. Staging of breast cancer The TNM staging system • This system takes into account: • the tumor size and spread (T), • whether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes (N) and • whether it has spread to distant organs (M) for metastasis
  • 31. • Stage 0 cancer means that the cancer is limited to the inside of the milk duct and is a non-invasive cancer. The treatment approaches for these non-invasive breast tumors are often different from the treatment of invasive breast cancer. Stage 0 breast tumors include ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) used to be categorized as Stage 0 but this has been changed, because it is not cancer, but does indicate a higher risk of breast cancer • Stage I: These breast cancers are still relatively small and either have not spread to the lymph nodes or have only a tiny area of cancer spread in the sentinel lymph node (the first lymph node to which cancer is likely to spread). • Stage II: These breast cancers are larger than stage I cancers and/or have spread to a few nearby lymph nodes. The TNM staging system
  • 32. The TNM staging system • Stage III: These tumors are larger or are growing into nearby tissues (the skin over the breast or the muscle underneath), or they have spread to many nearby lymph nodes. • Stage IV cancers have spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes to other parts of the body. Treatment for stage IV breast cancer is usually a systemic (drug) therapy. • Recurrent breast cancer : Cancer is called recurrent when it comes back after treatment . Recurrence can be local (in the same breast or in the surgery scar), regional (in nearby lymph nodes), or in a distant area. Treatment for recurrent breast cancer depends on where the cancer recurs and what treatments you’ve had before.
  • 33. • Triple-negative breast cancer cells don’t have estrogen or progesterone receptors and also don’t have too much of the protein. HER2 Triple-negative breast cancers grow and spread faster than most other types of breast cancer. Because the cancer cells don’t have hormone receptors, hormone therapy is not helpful in treating these cancers. And because they don’t have much HER2, drugs that target HER2 aren’t helpful, either. Chemotherapy is usually the standard treatment.
  • 34. Treatment options • Surgery • Radiation therapy • systemic therapy • Lumpectomy • Mastectomy • Lymph node dissection • breast reconstruction • External beam (3D conformal , IMRT) • Brachytherapy (High dose[HDR] or low dose [LDR]) • Intraoperative radiation (IORT) • Chemotherapy • Hormonal therapy • Targeted Drug therapy
  • 35. Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) • (also called a quadrantectomy, partial mastectomy, or segmental mastectomy) • A surgeryin which only the part of the breast containing the cancer is removed. • The goal is to remove the cancer as well as some surrounding normal tissue. How much of the breast is removed depends on the size and location of the tumor and other factors. • but makes it likely she will also need radiation.
  • 36. Who can get breast-conserving surgery? • Are very concerned about losing her breast • Are willing to have radiation therapy • Have not already had her breast treated with radiation therapy or BCS Have only one area of cancer on the breast, or multiple areas that are close enough to be removed together without changing the look of the breast too much • Have a small tumor (5 cm [2 inches] or smaller) • Are not pregnant or, if pregnant, will not need radiation therapy immediately (to avoid risking harm to the fetus) • Do not have a genetic factor such as a BRCA mutation, which might increase chance of a second cancer • Do not have certain serious connective tissue diseases such as scleroderma or lupus, which may make you especially sensitive to the side effects of radiation therapy • Do not have inflammatory breast cancer
  • 37. Choosing between breast-conserving surgery and mastectomy • Many women with early-stage cancers can choose between breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and mastectomy. • The main advantage of BCS is that a woman keeps most of her breast. • But in most cases she will also need radiation. • Women who have mastectomy for early stage cancers are less likely to need radiation. For some women, mastectomy may be a better option, because of the type of breast cancer, the large size of the tumor, previous treatment history, or certain other factors. Some women might be worried that having a less extensive surgery might raise their risk of the cancer coming back. But the fact is, in most cases, mastectomy does not give you any better chance of long-term survival or a better outcome from treatment. Studies following thousands of women for more than 20 years show that when BCS can be done along with radiation, having a mastectomy instead does not provide any better chance of survival.
  • 38. Side effects of breast-conserving surgery : • Pain or tenderness or a "tugging" sensation in the breast • Temporary swelling • Hard scar tissue that forms in the surgical site • Change in the shape of the breast Nerve (neuropathic) pain (sometimes described as burning or shooting pain) in the chest wall, armpit, and/or arm that doesn’t go away over time. • This can also happen in mastectomy patients and is called post-mastectomy pain syndrome or PMPS.
  • 39. Mastectomy • A surgery in which the entire breast is removed, including all of the breast tissue and sometimes other nearby tissues • It’s often done when a woman cannot be treated with breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy), which spares most of the breast. • It can also be done if a woman chooses mastectomy over breast-conserving surgery for personal reasons. • Women at very high risk of getting a second cancer sometimes have a double mastectomy, the removal of both breasts
  • 40. Types of mastectomies • Simple (or total) mastectomy In this procedure, the surgeon removes the entire breast, including the nipple, areola, and skin. Some underarm lymph nodes may or may not be removed depending on the situation. Most women, if they are hospitalized, can go home the next day. • Skin-sparing mastectomy • most of the skin over the breast is left intact. Only the breast tissue, nipple and areola are removed. • Nipple-sparing mastectomy • a variation of the skin-sparing mastectomy. In this procedure, the breast tissue is removed, but the breast skin and nipple are left in place.
  • 41.
  • 42. Modified radical mastectomy • A modified radical mastectomy combines a simple mastectomy with the removal of the lymph nodes under the arm (called an axillary lymph node dissection). • Radical mastectomy In this extensive operation, the surgeon removes the entire breast, axillary (underarm) lymph nodes, and the pectoral(chest wall) muscles under the breast. • Double mastectomy • If a mastectomy is done on both breasts, it is called a double • it is often a risk- reducing surgery for women at very high risk for getting breast cancer, such as those with a BRCA gene mutation.
  • 43. Mastectomy might be recommended if • Are unable to have radiation therapy • Would prefer a more extensive surgery instead of having radiation therapy • recurrence tumor post BCS • Multiple tumor in the same breast • Have a larger tumor (greater than 5 cm [2 inches] across), or a tumor that is large relative to your breast size • Are pregnant and would need radiation therapy while still pregnant (risking harm to the fetus) • Have a genetic factor such as a BRCA mutation, which might increase your chance of a second cancer • Have a serious connective tissue disease such as scleroderma or lupus, which may make you especially sensitive to the side effects of radiation therapy • Have inflammatory breast cancer
  • 44. Lymph Node Surgery for Breast Cancer • Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) • the surgeon finds and removes the first lymph node(s) to which a tumor is likely to spread • the surgeon injects a radioactive substance and/or a blue dye into the tumor • Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) • about 10 to 40 lymph nodes are removed • Usually done at the same time as the mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery • Side effects : • Lymphedema This is less common after (SLNB) than (ALND). • Limited arm and shoulder movement is more common after ALND than SLNB • Numbness of the skin on the upper arm
  • 45. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB)
  • 46. Adjuvant and neo-adjuvant therapy • Adjuvant systemic therapy: After surgery , Combat metastasis Chemotherapy and hormone therapy . • All node-positive patients should receive adjuvant chemotherapy • Neo-adjuvant therapy Before surgery , Reduce tumors Radiation therapy • But this doesn’t improve survival more than getting these treatments after surgery. • Patients with ER-positive tumors receive adjuvant hormonal therapy for 5 years. Tamoxifen is given to premenopausal women, and • aromatase inhibitors are given to postmenopausal women.
  • 47. Radiation therapy • Indications for adjuvant radiation • After mastectomy include T3 and T4 tumors attachment to the pectoral fascia, positive surgical margins, skin involvement, involved internal mammary nodes, inadequate or no axillary dissection, four or more positive lymph nodes, and residual tumor on the axillary vein. • Presence of one to three positive axillary nodes is a relative indication. • Adjuvant whole-breast radiation after BCT decreases the breast cancer recurrence rate from 30% to less than 7% at 5 years. • significantly decreased recurrence and improved survival in premenopausal women with these indications treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy
  • 48. external beam Radiation therapy • External beam radiation is the most common type of radiation therapy • Breast radiation therapy – applied after a lumpectomy • Chest wall radiation therapy – applied after a mastectomy the mastectomy scar, and the places where any drains exited the body after surgery • Breast boost - a high-dose of radiation therapy is applied to where the tumor was surgically removed • If cancer was found in the lymph nodes under the arm (axillary lymph nodes), this area may be given radiation, as well • Complications. Radiation to the chest wall can cause skin changes. • Infrequent complications include interstitial pneumonitis, spontaneous rib fracture, breast fibrosis, pericarditis, pleural effusion, and chest wall myositis. Radiation to the axilla can increase the incidence of lymphedema and axillary fibrosis. • Angiosarcoma can occur as a late
  • 49. Brachytherapy • also known as internal radiation, is another way to deliver radiation therapy. Instead of aiming radiation beams from outside the body, a device containing radioactive seeds or pellets is placed into the breast tissue for a short time in the area where the cancer had been removed. • For women who had (BCS), brachytherapy can be used along with external beam radiation as a way to add an extra boost of radiation to the tumor site. • Tumor size, location, and other factors may limit who can get brachytherapy.
  • 50. Types of brachytherapy • Interstitial brachytherapy: In this approach, several small catheters are inserted into the breast around the area where the cancer was removed and are left in place for several days. • it is not used as much anymore • Intracavitary brachytherapy This is the most common type of brachytherapy for women with breast cancer. A device is put into the space left from BCS and is left in place until treatment is complete. There are several different devices available most of which require surgical training for proper placement
  • 51. Chemotherapy • anti-cancer drugs that may be given IV or by mouth. • adjuvant chemotherapy : Adjuvant chemo is used to try to kill any cancer cells that might have been left behind or have spread but can't be seen • neoadjuvant chemotherapy can be used to try to shrink the tumor so it can be removed with less extensive surgery • For advanced breast cancer be used as the main treatment for women whose cancer has spread outside the breast and underarm area • cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) will achieve a 25 per cent reduction in the risk of relapse over a 10- to 15-year period. • Newer ‘biological’ agents will be used more frequently as molecular targets are identified – the first of these, trastuzamab (Herceptin), is active against tumours containing the growth factor receptor c-erbB2. Other agents currently available include bevacizumab, a vascular growth factor receptor inhibitor, and lapitinab .
  • 52. Side effect • The side effects of chemo depend on: • the type of drugs used • the amount given • and the length of treatment • Short – term side effects · Hair loss · Loss of appetite or increased appetite · Nausea and vomiting · A higher risk of infection · Stopping of menstrual periods · Easy bruising or bleeding · Being very tired • Long - term side effects • Menstrual changes: infertility • Nerve damage: pain, burning or tingling and sensitivity to cold or hot. • Heart damage
  • 53. Hormone therapy • Some types of breast cancer are affected by hormones in the blood. ER-positive and PR-positive breast cancer1 cells have receptors (proteins) that attach to estrogen • adjuvant therapy VS neoadjuvant therapy • These drugs work by stopping estrogen from stimulating breast cancer cells to grow. • Tamoxifen has been the most widely used ‘hormonal’ treatment in breast cancer it has now been shown to reduce the annual rate of recurrence by 25 per cent, with a 17 per cent reduction in the annual rate of death • It is usually taken for at least 5 years • Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs which induce a reversible ovarian suppression and thus have the same beneficial effects as surgical or radiation-induced ovarian ablation in premenopausal receptor-positive women
  • 54. Hormone therapy • the oral aromatase inhibitors (AIs) for postmenopausal women The latter group of compounds are now licensed for treatment of recurrent disease, in which they have been shown to be superior to tamoxifen. anastrazole to tamoxifen in the adjuvant setting has shown a beneficial effect for the aromatase inhibitor in terms of relapse-free survival, although no benefit for overall survival. There is an additional reduction in contralateral disease, which makes this drug suitable for a study of prevention, and the side-effect profile is different from that of tamoxifen. The AIs have been more expensive than tamoxifen but are all coming off patent protection and generic copies may allow more widespread use. There is an increase in bone density loss with patients on an AI and a bone density scan is advised prior to commencement with treatment of underlying osteopenia or osteporosis.

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  1. This surgery was once very common, but less extensive surgery (such as the modified radical mastectomy) has been found to be just as effective and with fewer side effects, so this surgery is rarely done now. This operation may still be done for large tumors that are growing into the pectoral muscles. Dm Most of these mastectomies are simple mastectomies, but some may be nipple-sparing.