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Creating a Product Roadmap - Product Strategy Series

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How to create a product roadmap using the Roman Pitchler's framework.

The presentation also discusses how and where it fits into the broader process, including some suggested parallel activities which provide meaningful tension.

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Veröffentlicht in: Technologie
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Creating a Product Roadmap - Product Strategy Series

  1. 1. CREATING A PRODUCT ROADMAP A powerful tool to define how a product will deliver value over time, whilst maintaining strategic direction. If frames the work in business language which helps with senior stakeholder buy-in and alignment, as well as securing resources for developing the product. Product Strategy Series with Mike Biggs Mike Biggs @MetaMikeBiggs
  2. 2. KEY GOALS OF A PRODUCT ROADMAP ● Define business value, (and metrics) over time which allows executives to engage with the product development at an appropriate level. ● Ensure the business value of each product is aligned with the business strategy and vision ● Allows key decision makers to see what product developments are expected as far into the future as possible, and therefore can plan and influence appropriately. ● Articulate a vision that is certain enough to provide a meaningful tension with the delivery constraints WHILST being vague enough to withstand change based on learning (experience). The Roadmap may also provide: 6. It can articulate external considerations such as dependencies, market and business context issues, and PESTLE DE as a general environmental scan. 7. Align multiple products so their combined value is meaningful. (Portfolio version) Is Visionary by definition and: a. Generative (abductive) in its thinking b. Articulates what could be, not what is c. Tells a narrative (right brain)
  3. 3. PARALLEL PROCESS Product Strategy
  4. 4. PARALLEL PROCESSES Research/ learnings Themes/ epics Stories Story map Release plan Product vision Discrete solution elements Product roadmap Delivery backlog TensionTensionTension Begins to provide tangible feature elements that pair with Stories. May consist of wireframe elements. Articulates a unique combination of: ● Market ● Solution ● Human Need Articulates the business value delivered over time (releases) including goals, and key business metrics. Broad customer problems to solve. Breakdown of epics to define the granular stories that need to be built over time. Brings together the granular problems to solve with granular solutions whilst structuring them into value goals over time. How big are the things to build? When can we get them done by? Hey, build this stuff. Deep Reductive Constraints Probability Broad Abductive Generative Possibility Where does product visioning and roadmapping fit into the world?
  5. 5. MANAGING THE TENSION At any point in time, there must be a healthy tension that combine and balance the value embodied in the vision, with the tangible reality of action. Outcomes of the balance are to: ● Remain relevant to customers and market ● Be able to change according to new information from any potential source Roadmap pulls to the future and defines value Story breakdown & Analysis drives deep into what can and will be done. Build, measure, learn
  6. 6. PRODUCT ROADMAP TEMPLATE
  7. 7. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT PRODUCT ROADMAP ~One Quarter Capture Data “Ability to capture data in current blackspots and share that information with key actors. Provided data will allow a user to more accurately order and allocate meters.” Scan in, out, at key gates. View captured data. System is considered USABLE to: Store Person and Inventory controller. # in stock physically is equal to # in stock in our system. Accuracy of ordering information is improved, compared to current system. Example
  8. 8. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT PRODUCT ROADMAP Following (up to) 7 weeks Interpret and Predict “Ability to draw more complex insights from new and existing data sources. The process of drawing insights for increased ordering accuracy is automated.” Capture additional existing sources of data. Apply business logic to data. Generate specific ordering data. Accuracy of order numbers generated are more accurate than current manual system. Reduction in human effort required to generate order accuracy. Reduction in interactions/ handoffs required to place an order. Example
  9. 9. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT PRODUCT ROADMAP Following (up to) 9 weeks Increase quality of the system and reduce human effort “Tighten the precision of measures to improve accuracy. Automate more standardised tasks.” E.g. Stock to order validation points. Ability to lodge an order rejection (acceptance testing) Automated stock order creation and send. Reduction in human effort for same outcomes and quality of predictions. (ratio) Example
  10. 10. Product Roadmap (ON ONE SLIDE) 10 ~ One Quarter Following (up to) 7 weeks Following (up to) 9 weeks CAPTURE DATA INTERPRET & PREDICT INCREASE QUALITY OF THE SYSTEM & REDUCE HUMAN EFFORT “Ability to capture data in current blackspots and share that information with key actors. Provided data will allow a user to more accurately order and allocate meters.” “Ability to draw more complex insights from new and existing data sources. The process of drawing insights for increased ordering accuracy is automated.” “Tighten the precision of measures to improve accuracy. Automate more standardised tasks.” Scan in, out, at key gates. View captured data. Capture additional existing sources of data. Apply business logic to data. Generate specific ordering data. E.g. Stock to order validation points. Ability to lodge an order rejection (acceptance testing) Automated stock order creation and send. System is considered USABLE to: Storeperson and Inventory controller. # in stock physically is equal to # in stock in our system. Accuracy of ordering information is improved, compared to current system. Accuracy of order numbers generated are more accurate than current manual system. Reduction in human effort required to generate order accuracy. Reduction in interactions/ hand-offs required to place an order. Reduction in human effort for same outcomes and quality of predictions. (ratio) Example
  11. 11. PRODUCT ROADMAP REVIEW Example product is here!
  12. 12. PRODUCT PORTFOLIO Product Strategy
  13. 13. PRODUCT PORTFOLIO
  14. 14. MINIMUM VIABLE PORTFOLIO Developing value across the portfolio is much like creating a product level MVP. It calls out the need for a clear strategy that spans the entire portfolio, rather than a vision or strategy that only covers a single product. You will need to ensure you have a clear statement of the business strategy so that meaningful and aligned prioritisation decisions for the portfolio can be made.
  15. 15. PRIORITISATION Product Strategy
  16. 16. PRIORITISATION Strategy Products & Services Themes & Epics Stories & Features Value x Risk = Priority Value / Effort = Priority Value / Effort = Priority Existential risk Effort required Maintaining a clear line of sight from the story being worked on in a team, all the way up to the strategy is important but there are different elements that provide that alignment at each stage of the way. At higher levels, in the business the biggest risk is relevance, not complexity of the solution or effort required. (Basic) equation used to prioritise. (create your own using WSJF with these considerations in mind). Which products are the most valuable in pursuit of our business strategy? Which story provides the most value to the key stakeholders within this product? Which feature provides the best experience to the primary users of this interface?
  17. 17. QUESTIONS At this point you probably have some...
  18. 18. FAQ’s How do we get client to stop focusing on features and scope? ● Frame all conversations about needs, problems to be solved, and value; not features to be built. This shifts the focus away from scope, to a value based conversation and provides flexibility in the approach to delivering the agreed value. ● Consider the Lean/Agile maturity of the organisation and the team you are working with. Their focus on scope may be due to their lack of experience working this way. They may have been working in waterfall in the past and needed to lock down scope to manage vendors. ● Take a point of view. Make a bold statement of what can and will be. Be concrete about it, without being ridiculous. This can and will change, but it’s far more useful for executives and teams alike, to have a very clear vision of where we need to go. What if the timings are all out of whack across products in the portfolio? ● In the same way you would try to break down stories to a similar size so you can manage your flow via WIP, and to give meaningful predictions through VELOCITY (even though it’s voodoo), you can use the same principle to chunk work in the roadmap. ● Chunk the releases or phases by value, and not features. This will help you to better align them, and maintain the focus required at this level. There is a risk that a chunk of value may be underestimated, but keep in mind, you could take two releases do do a bigger piece of work if required. ● Are there external constraints or a cadence that must be adhered to, such as integration with a legacy system, or regulation, or compliance etc? This may form the size of your roadmap timings.
  19. 19. FAQ’s But we haven’t even done a Product Vision? ● If you aren’t explicit about creating and documenting a vision, it will develop organically and implicitly through other activities, with potential for disaster. ● It’s ok to start from where you are now by creating a roadmap, then step back and think about the Product Vision with a view to revise if they are out of sync. ● A product vision is like a simplified version of a Business Model Canvas. If you already have a Business Model Canvas, you can likely define a Product Vision very easily. ● Link to Product Vision Board How do we prioritise value chunks over time in the roadmap, and across products in the portfolio? ● Use the Business Strategy to inform this prioritisation. You should expect the strategy to be provided to you and meet the following criteria: ○ Short, succinct, and easy to understand. ○ Takes into consideration: Market forces/changes, Human / User/ Customer needs, and who the company is, and will be in the future (identity, and assets). ○ If you need help creating one of these try these resources: ■ Link to Strategy Canvas ● More frameworks to come if people are interested. ■ Mike/ Ian / Jonny
  20. 20. FAQ’s What is a Product Strategy anyway? This term is often used to describe two separate things. ● The strategy employed to deliver certain value as articulated in the Product Vision. This is essentially a strategy that operates in pursuit of a particular product, and is somewhat covered in the Vision Board. It is worth pausing at this point and thinking about some additional issues such as the broader resources, context and principles that will allow you to realise the product. This can be explored and defined using the Strategy Canvas. This canvas can be useful at many points in the business. From product, down to UX, all the way up to Corporate strategy. Link to the Strategy Canvas. ● The other meaning refers to the strategy that the products participate in. This has been touched on in the point above about prioritising value across products. In a delivery team you should expect this to be well understood and defined by the Product Owner, if not, the organisation may need help with product and or strategy as a capability, or potentially with employing a more open and aligned culture. The Strategy Canvas is useful for this level also, but will call on very different inputs, and define an approach at a higher level of abstraction. This strategy is largely made up of the desires and capabilities of the organisation combined with market opportunity and human needs.
  21. 21. RESOURCES At this point you probably need some...
  22. 22. BRINGING TOGETHER AN ACTIONABLE STRATEGY
  23. 23. EVOLUTION TO THE INNOVATION SQUID DIAGRAM
  24. 24. EVOLUTIONS OF PRODUCT SOLUTION FIT “Remembering that a Strategic Position is a solution to a Market problem. This model can be applied at any level of abstraction in the business.”
  25. 25. PRODUCT VISION CANVAS
  26. 26. Political: These factors determine the extent to which a government may influence the economy or a certain industry. [For example] a government may impose a new tax or duty due to which entire revenue generating structures of organizations might change. Political factors include tax policies, Fiscal policy, trade tariffs etc. that a government may levy around the fiscal year and it may affect the business environment (economic environment) to a great extent. Economic: These factors are determinants of an economy’s performance that directly impacts a company and have resonating long term effects. [For example] a rise in the inflation rate of any economy would affect the way companies’ price their products and services. Adding to that, it would affect the purchasing power of a consumer and change demand/supply models for that economy. Economic factors include inflation rate, interest rates, foreign exchange rates, economic growth patterns etc. It also accounts for the FDI (foreign direct investment) depending on certain specific industries who’re undergoing this analysis. Social: These factors scrutinize the social environment of the market, and gauge determinants like cultural trends, demographics, population analytics etc. An example for this can be buying trends for Western countries like the US where there is high demand during the Holiday season. Technological: These factors pertain to innovations in technology that may affect the operations of the industry and the market favorably or unfavorably. This refers to automation, research and development and the amount of technological awareness that a market possesses. Legal: These factors have both external and internal sides. There are certain laws that affect the business environment in a certain country while there are certain policies that companies maintain for themselves. Legal analysis takes into account both of these angles and then charts out the strategies in light of these legislations. For example, consumer laws, safety standards, labor laws etc. Environmental: These factors include all those that influence or are determined by the surrounding environment. This aspect of the PESTLE is crucial for certain industries particularly for example tourism, farming, agriculture etc. Factors of a business environmental analysis include but are not limited to climate, weather, geographical location, global changes in climate, environmental offsets etc Recent additions: Ethical Demographic PESTELE DE
  27. 27. LINKS ● Roman Pichler Product Stuff - http://www.romanpichler.com/ ● Jim Kalbach - Strategy Canvas guy, and fellow Jazz metaphorist https://experiencinginformation.com/2015/10/12/strategy-blueprint/
  28. 28. END OF PRESENTATION

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