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Addressable Customer Experience - Audience Insights and Strategy

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Addressable Customer Experience - Audience Insights and Strategy

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Watch this Addressable Customer Experience webinar here: http://bit.ly/1A52sqx

Addressable Customer Experience On-Demand Webinar Series - For Financial Services and Insurance Marketing Leaders

Webinar 2: Audience Insight and Strategy

Learn how to segment your audience base and develop a strategy that leverages audience insights to move each customer through his or her lifecycle and ultimately convert. Full of actionable instruction, this webinar will equip marketers to create a thoughtful and thorough strategy.

Watch this Addressable Customer Experience webinar here: http://bit.ly/1A52sqx

Addressable Customer Experience On-Demand Webinar Series - For Financial Services and Insurance Marketing Leaders

Webinar 2: Audience Insight and Strategy

Learn how to segment your audience base and develop a strategy that leverages audience insights to move each customer through his or her lifecycle and ultimately convert. Full of actionable instruction, this webinar will equip marketers to create a thoughtful and thorough strategy.

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Addressable Customer Experience - Audience Insights and Strategy

  1. 1. Module 1: Audience Insights and Strategy Matt Naeger EVP, Digital Strategy Leah van Zelm Principal Consultant
  2. 2. Source: Media Bistro Feb 2014 http://www.mediabistro.com/prnewser/what-are-americas-10-most-trusted-brands-and-why_b57512 What do these companies have in common?
  3. 3. • Companies are targeting the same audience, providing options • Customers expect experiences • Companies must respond across the customer journey Commodity Product Service Experience Today’s experience ecosystem is more complex than ever – more media, more channels, and “always on.”
  4. 4. Increasing shareholder vaue The real opportunity is to transform the customer experience But the brands that can transform the customer experience within this complex ecosystem will win. Most marketers are focused here ShareholderValue “Find me” “Amaze me” Customer Experience Differentiation “Know me”
  5. 5. FN1: The Business Impact Of Customer Experience, 2013by Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian, June 10, 2013 $136 Credit card providers 61 million customers Insurance providers 15 million customers Banks 15 million customers $111 $14 Additional purchases Churn reduction Word of mouth $162 $65 $9 $548 $290 $27 Advancing from a below average to an above average customer experience is worth millions of dollars. $866 million/yr $262 million/yr $237 million/yr
  6. 6. AIDEN Context around insurance: “ Flexibility Provides Value” Context around brand choice: “Simple Buying Leads to Good Life” Connected Decision Map Informs Context
  7. 7. Personalization Based on Anonymous Data Exposure Consideration “Build cash value starting now” InsureCo Ad Visits InsureCo.comRetargeted Display “What age to get life insurance?” Searches For Insurance “Good value from flexibility for years to come” Rated # 1 among…for simplicity and flexibility Informs Informs Captured Search Data Browsing History “Young Professionals” bundle Segment Specific Media Buy and Message
  8. 8. Consideration Quote Save Quote? Saved Quote is Emailed & Texted Recommended Coverage Levels within the Bundle” Social Sign in Decision Engine Drives Coverage Recommendation Cross-Device Awareness Retargeted “Good value from innovative brand. Finally insurance that’s understandable” Enters basic information Value Informs Bid Amount Save Quote History
  9. 9. Apply Familiarize One application for 3 product bundle Email Reminder Imagery related to “The Good Life” segment “We’ll do the work, you go live ‘The Good Life’” Save time and hassle with the ‘Young Professionals’ bundle” Accepts Insurance Offer and determines beneficiary Receives Package Starts Application Determine Beneficiaries 2 Days Later Personalization Email Content Is Segment Focused Electronic delivery for self and beneficiary Creative and Message Test and Learn
  10. 10. Engage Follow-up Visits InsureCo.com Additional Coverage Call Center Reinforcement Returning Customer Recognized Social Display Remarketed Shown “Newlywed Package” Email Content Informed By Customer History Decision Engine Determines New Coverage Recommendation 3 Years Later Call Center Script Is Segment Sensitive Billing Question
  11. 11. W E P L A N T H I S : Sees ad Calls in Becomes a customer Loyalty But how do organizations adapt to experiences in an omni-channel world? B U T C U S T O M E R S D O T H I S :
  12. 12. Adapting in an omni-channel world requires a disciplined process. • Enterprise Segmentation • Behavioral triggers & sequencing • Lifecycle stages • Value score • Corporate • Brand • Product & service • Media • Creative & messaging • Offer • Channel • Customer Strategy • Audience sizing • Experience blueprint • Media plan • Creative brief • Targeting & personalization plan • Budgeting & forecasting • Measurement plan • Online onsite • Online offsite • Call Center • POS • Offline (print, mail, TV, outdoor, radio) • Portfolio • Experience • Interaction • Touch Point STRATEGY PLANNING DEVELOPENT & LAUNCH AUDIENCE INSIGHT OPTIMIZATION
  13. 13. • Enterprise Segmentation • Behavioral triggers & sequencing • Lifecycle stages • Value score At the foundation of the process is audience insight. STRATEGY PLANNING DEVELOPENT & LAUNCH OPTIMIZATIONAUDIENCE INSIGHT
  14. 14. Lifecycle stages Enterprise segmentation Behavioral triggers & sequencing Value score Audience insight refers to understanding motivations, behaviors, lifecycle and value. CONTEXT
  15. 15. ABSTRACT Slow & Intensive INSTINCTIVE Immediate & Decisive Enterprise segmentation Attribute 45 MPG Personal ValueGood Parent DECISIONCHAIN Functional Consequence Fuel Efficient Saves Me Money Personal Consequence
  16. 16. PERSONAL VALUES PERSONAL CONSEQUENCES FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES ATTRIBUTES Distinct Style Classic Style Increased Focus Increased Confidence Showcase My Style Appropriately Achievement Statement Piece Prominent Design Large Stones Chunky Pattern Edgy, Unexpected Modern, Contemporary Timeless Simple Clean Lines Delicate Design Solid Material Not Flashy/Discre et Exotic Lines Recognizable Status Symbol Accepted part of group Self Esteem Elevated Perception from Others Exclusive / Not Easily Attainable Craftsmanshi p / Well Made Premium Brand Expensive Positive Reputation Gratification Good Life Reward Memorable Good Customer Service No Rush Recommend Products Know My Preferences Celebrate Occasion Experience Iconic or Legendary Brand Signature Style Tradition Sustained Value All American
  17. 17. Connected Decision Mapping Applied to Insurance
  18. 18. PERSONAL VALUES PERSONAL CONSEQUENCES FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES ATTRIBUTES Peace of Mind Time with Family Good Life Feel Smart Less Worry Save Time and Hassle Good Decision Reliable Simple Buying Process Understand- able Reputation Recommended Easy to Follow Policy Reviews By Friend By Advisor By Familiy Consumer Friendly Terms Right policy CONNECTED DECISION MAP Insurance Do More with Money Feel Smart Stay in Budget Good Value Flexibility Affordable for Policy Good Brand Longevity Price Terms Coverage Amount Do More with Money Feel Smart Stay in Budget Good Value Flexibility Affordable for Policy Good Brand Longevity Price Terms Coverage Amount
  19. 19. PERSONAL VALUES PERSONAL CONSEQUENCES FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES ATTRIBUTES Do More with Money Feel Smart Stay in Budget Good Value Flexibility Affordable for Policy Good Brand Longevity Price Terms Coverage Amount Time with Family Good Life Feel Smart Save Time and Hassle Good Decision Simple Buying Process Understand- able Recommended Easy to Follow Policy By Friend By Advisor By Familiy Consumer Friendly Terms Right policy CONNECTED DECISION MAP Insurance Peace of Mind Less Worry Reliable Reputation ReviewsLongevity Peace of Mind Less Worry Reliable Reputation ReviewsLongevity
  20. 20. PERSONAL VALUES PERSONAL CONSEQUENCES FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES ATTRIBUTES Do More with Money Feel Smart Stay in Budget Good Value Flexibility Affordable for Policy Good Brand Longevity Price Terms Coverage Amount Feel Smart Good Decision Peace of Mind Less Worry CONNECTED DECISION MAP Insurance Time with Family Good Life Save Time and Hassle Simple Buying Process Understand- able Recommended Easy to Follow Policy By Friend By Advisor By Familiy Consumer Friendly Terms Right policy Reliable Reputation ReviewsLongevity Time with Family Good Life Save Time and Hassle Simple Buying Process Understand- able Recommended Easy to Follow Policy By Friend By Advisor By Familiy Consumer Friendly Terms Right policy Reliable Reputation ReviewsLongevity
  21. 21. PERSONAL VALUES PERSONAL CONSEQUENCES FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES ATTRIBUTES Do More with Money Feel Smart Stay in Budget Good Value Flexibility Affordable for Policy Good Brand Longevity Price Terms Coverage Amount Peace of Mind Less Worry Time with Family Good Life Save Time and Hassle Simple Buying Process Recommended By Friend By Advisor By Familiy Reliable Reputation Reviews CONNECTED DECISION MAP Insurance Feel Smart Good Decision Understand- able Easy to Follow Policy Consumer Friendly Terms Right policy Feel Smart Good Decision Understand- able Easy to Follow Policy Consumer Friendly Terms Right policy
  22. 22. It’s important to … Stay in budget and make a good decision It’s important to… Worry less It’s important to… Save time and hassle I want to… Get a good value I want… reliability I want … Simplicity and reliability Give me… affordability, flexibility, easy to follow products Give me… Good reputation, longevity Give me… Recommended brand and easy to follow products Good LifeFeel Smart Peace of Mind By identifying people with similar motivations, segments emerge.
  23. 23. PERSONAL VALUES PERSONAL CONSEQUENCES FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES ATTRIBUTES Time with Family Good Life Save Time and Hassle Simple Buying Process Understand- able Reputation Recommended Easy to Follow Policy Reviews By Friend By Advisor By Familiy Consumer Friendly Terms Right policy “We’ll do the work, you go live ‘The Good Life’” Save time and hassle with the ‘Young Professionals’ bundle” One application for 3 product bundle Finally insurance that’s understandable “Young Professionals” package
  24. 24. Behavioral triggers & sequencing Age 34 | Income $100K | Male Aiden Visits Sports, News, Fashion sites Owns a smartphone, 10.5” tablet, 7” tablet, laptop Doesn’t watch TV unless it is online Travels with friends, discusses experiences online Doesn’t understand insurance Has a dog, and drives an SUV Is about to get married and wants children Has a PHD in Psychology Likes to hike, lives in the upper Midwest DEVICE DMA BUYING BEHAVIOR ONLINE COMMENTARY SITE VISITATION SOCIAL MEDIA USE
  25. 25. Lifecycle stages Awareness Consideration Quote Application Advocacy Loyalty
  26. 26. Value score is an important input into contact planning Segment: Good Life Individual: Aiden Expected LTV: $950 Segment: Good Life Individual: Cookie 12365 Expected LTV: $250 Anonymous Individual $4.00 $.45 $.80-$9.50 $.04 $.15 $.03 $.01 Average CostTouch Points Native Social Direct Mail Outbound Call Email Search RLSA Display Online Video Level of investment high medium low
  27. 27. How does it work? Audience Value Propositions Customer Experience Blueprint Communication Architecture Drives core media and message Message sequencing plan Aligned to audience, exp blueprint and communication architecture
  28. 28. Discussion 1. How would you rank your organization when it comes to 2. Which of these four areas currently poses the biggest challenge/opportunity/gap? 3. What would it mean to you (monetarily) to advance in these areas? Lifecycle stages Enterprise segmentation Behavioral triggers & sequencing Value score
  29. 29. Thank You! To watch the full webinar presentation, please head here: http://bit.ly/1A52sqx

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Talking points:
    What do these companies have in common?
    They are the top 10 most trusted brands
    What do they have in common? Innovative and differentiated experience; and ability to adapt to the consumer


    1. Amazon: It could be the fact that Amazon remains the first and biggest online retailer with a reputation for security and an endless inventory. It could be the brand’s truly innovative recommendation system. Or it could be Amazon’s plan to create its own “virtual” currency–because no dishonest individual would ever make his own money, right?
    2. Apple: Of course the public respects a brand that has long dominated the world of innovative technology and customer service. But Apple hasn’t released any “wow” products for a while, and the company’s new semi-desperate PR approach tells us that they probably won’t rank so high next year.
    3. The Walt Disney Company: We could be wrong, but we’d like to think people trust Disney because Pixar still somehow manages to make great movies. We also feel like everyone took a cue from the horrible promo campaign and skipped John Carter.
    4. Google: The “Don’t be evil” company’s “premature” earnings statement was a big PR fail, but it has maintained a reputation as a great place to work. And we don’t care how many cute videos Microsoft releases–we’re still not going to use Bing.
    5. Johnson & Johnson: We find this one surprising in light of all the product recall business. But the PR team did as well as it could with damage control, and any brand known as “the baby company” has already earned some trust from the public. Keep your eye on J&J next year, though.
    6. Coca-Cola: While some say that the public loves Coke because it “sells happiness”, we will attribute this position to its bold decision to admit that Americans should probably consume a little less of its product unless they want to end up like this unfortunate lady. It can’t be because our fellow Americans trust Taylor Swift more than Beyoncé–Bey would never write a breakup song that is so obviously about John Mayer.
    7. Whole Foods: It’s expensive–and its CEO is very good at placing his foot in his mouth. But Whole Foods does sell top-quality products, and it’s well-known for its CSR and purpose marketing successes. The whole “in-store drinking” experiment was pretty cool too.
    8. Sony: “Green” isn’t everything–quality products like the ever-popular Playstation guarantee a good reputation for Sony, which seems to have emerged from a 2011 hacking scandal with an even stronger public image. It also gets great marks for customer service.
    9. Procter & Gamble: The other “baby company” has always earned high marks for leadership within its industry. We don’t quite understand why, but we’re going to say “Moms. Moms. Moms.”
    10. Costco: It’s simple: people love cheap stuff. People also love underdogs, a tag that could apply to any company competing with Walmart. Costco also doesn’t have too many problems with things like fake PR stunts, terrible labor practices, large-scale employee protests or testy relationships with major media outlets.
  • Talking Points:
    Need to say that the brands on previous slides advanced their product or service to a full on experience, etc. to tie to the points on this page.
    We have to say here that the customer now controls how, when and where they experience your brand and that in order to continue to meet those needs companies need to be building on what those experience pathways will be regarless of how the customer chooses to navigate them. The technology needs to enable smarter personalization across media and channels and then be smart enough to react with the appropriate feedback.




    We are in the era of customer experience.
    Customers do not see interactions with your brand as specific to one particular channel or another, they simply experience your brand in whatever mechanism is activated.
    For this reason, the entire ecosystem of digital technology must be leveraged at all times, and the use of those channels must be subtle and effective. We can’t blast anymore.

    [Bullets previously on slide removed by samlab]:
    Companies are targeting the same audience, giving consumers a lot of options
    Customers expect to control how, when and where they experience a brand
    Customers expect more than just products or services – they expect experiences
    Companies have the onus to adapt/respond real time with appropriate feedback across the customer journey
    But, today’s experience ecosystem is more complex than ever – more media, more channels, “always on”
  • Talking points:
    When customers get what they want and feel like a brand understands them they become more loyal and their value increases proportionally.
    Moving from a below average to an above experience is worth millions of dollars. (Forrester study)
  • Talking points:
    Forrester looked at value of companies across many industries if they go from below average to above average customer experience scores
    A credit card company with 61 million customers could drive additional 866 million / yr from improving customer experience

    ------

    Trust is earned by providing customers with the information that they want and answering the questions that they are asking in a more relevant way and through the lens of the customer and not the organization.
    These five areas become the foundation of building on the 3C's and ensuring that the experience serves the customer's purpose.
  • Aiden, a young professional that views himself as a wise individual. He grew up in a middle class home and though he hasn’t had financial hardships, he sees many of his peers are becoming increasingly responsible, as evidenced by their recent home purchases, increasing frugality and financial planning.
  • Email Reinforces Aiden’s Required Context. Aiden’s expectation is that going with InsureCo is an easy/simple choice, has a good reputation, nice bundle of products, and great reviews.
  • Aiden filed an auto claim and there was a small discrepancy in the information that the claims agent provided. An honest mistake and the agents supervisor sent a personal message apologizing for the mistake and explaining next steps to prevent this from happening again. Aiden, using a tablet, goes online to look at adding additional auto coverage and pricing a life policy. Though he doesn’t enter contact information, InsureCo recognizes Aiden. Based on website and search activity, InsureCo infers that Aiden is a newlywed
  • Companies can conceptualize “the” customer journey but the reality is that no two paths are the same; companies must be adaptive.

    Talking Points

    We can talk about and show the conceptual nature of a customer journey, but the reality is that no two journey paths are the same. There are just too many points of contact and too many behaviors to account for everything. The best marketers know and understand this and use audience insights about the drivers of need, the tools used to gather the information and how the environment of the audience member will adjust the methodology that they use and the answer that they want.
    No two fingerprints are the same, neither are absorptions of content and dialogue.
    The best digital marketers understand that no single channel can solve the rubix cube of human experience.
    Data and the integration of data analysis in real time allow for every channel in the ecosystem to be leveraged at the appropriate time.
    There are just too many points of contact and too many behaviors to account for everything. The best marketers know and understand this and use audience insights about the drivers of need, the tools used to gather the information and how the environment of the audience member will adjust the methodology that they use and the answer that they want.
  • Four critical pieces of insight must be understood to plan the addressable experience.
  • Talking points:
    Dual process theory – scientists have uncovered 2 types of thinking (reference book thinking fast and slow); provide examples.
    We use this as foundation of our research because if we can understand how people make decisions, we can start influencing them
  • Talking points
    This is the CDM for insurance that is driving Aiden’s experience
    Decisioning can change based on funnel phase. Found that during uppper funnel decisions, good value and flexibility
  • Talking points
    This is the CDM for insurance that is driving Aiden’s experience
    Decisioning can change based on funnel phase. Found that during uppper funnel decisions, good value and flexibility
  • Talking points
    This is the CDM for insurance that is driving Aiden’s experience
    Decisioning can change based on funnel phase. Found that during uppper funnel decisions, good value and flexibility
  • Talking points
    This is the CDM for insurance that is driving Aiden’s experience
    Decisioning can change based on funnel phase. Found that during uppper funnel decisions, good value and flexibility
  • Talking points
    This is the CDM for insurance that is driving Aiden’s experience
    Decisioning can change based on funnel phase. Found that during uppper funnel decisions, good value and flexibility

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