Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

GA_Leading_in_the_Digital_Age

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
LEADING
IN THE
DIGITAL
AGE
Leading in the Digital Age
Five Critical Skills for Executive Leadership
In a world that’s become increasingly digital, large
companies can sometimes find it hard to adapt.
Companies that will th...
introduction
—
3
2 Pew Internet and American Life Project Study, Sept. 2013 I 3 CNN, January 2013 I 4 ComScore stats, via
...
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 18 Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Ähnlich wie GA_Leading_in_the_Digital_Age (20)

Anzeige

GA_Leading_in_the_Digital_Age

  1. 1. LEADING IN THE DIGITAL AGE Leading in the Digital Age Five Critical Skills for Executive Leadership
  2. 2. In a world that’s become increasingly digital, large companies can sometimes find it hard to adapt. Companies that will thrive will be led by executives who have an understanding of the forces shaping their environment and an awareness of the skills necessary to master those forces. There are four distinct digital forces that are impacting the business landscape: introduction — 2 1 Based on a study that said the iPad 2 is faster than the Cray, and the Geekbench score that shows the iPhone 5 is faster than the iPad 2. 01 EVOLUTION OF HARDWARE Hardware will continue to get smaller, faster, and more powerful. Consider this: in 1985, the most powerful computer on the planet was the Cray-2 Supercomputer. It filled an entire room, required a custom liquid-cooling system, and cost $5.5 million to construct. Twenty- seven years later, Apple released a device that topped the Cray’s computing power — it fit in the back pocket of your jeans and cost $199 with a two-year contract. They called it the iPhone 5.1
  3. 3. introduction — 3 2 Pew Internet and American Life Project Study, Sept. 2013 I 3 CNN, January 2013 I 4 ComScore stats, via Geekwire, October 2013 I 5 ITU Telecom report, February 2013 I 6 Based on 500 million Tweets per day 7 According to YouTube’s own stats I 8 Based on 55 million photos a day I 9 Based on 4.5 billion daily “likes” I 10 From an interview at the Techonomy conference in Lake Tahoe, August 2010 02 HYPERCONNECTIVITY Americans are increasingly connected and dependent on mobile devices. 63% of mobile phone owners report using their phones to go online in 2013; of that group, a full one-third said that the phone was the only device they used to access the internet.2 In 2013, many websites — including behemoths like Facebook 3 and ESPN4 — saw mobile traffic (smartphones and tablets) surpass desktop traffic. Worldwide, there are currently 6.8 billion mobile phones in use, almost as many service plans as there are people on the planet.5 03 SOCIAL If you’re reading this, you almost certainly don’t have to be convinced about the ubiquity and massive popularity of social media, but just in case you still do, consider this: On average, every minute of every day: » 347,000 Tweets are sent6 » 100 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube7 » 38,000 photos are Instagrammed8 » 3.1 million Facebook items are “liked”9 04 DATA "There was 5 exabytes of information created between the dawn of civilization through 2003… that much information is now created every 2 days, and the pace is increasing.” -Google CEO Eric Schmidt10
  4. 4. overview — 4 So how does a corporation cope with customers and employees who are increasingly plugged-in, savvy, vocal, and tied to their gadgets? The answer will vary, of course, depending on your company’s specific needs. But a solid starting point for any forward-looking executive would be mastering the five distinct skills that this white paper will briefly examine.
  5. 5. overview — 5 SKILL 1 SKILL 2 SKILL 3 SKILL 4 SKILL 5 EXTERNAL FOCUS Large companies should purposely pursue innova- tive ideas and products — even if they come from outside the organization. MANAGEMENT OF OPEN & FLUID TEAMS The fast-moving digital world demands teams that are nimble, flexible, and good at working across multiple departments. DATA-DRIVEN EXPERIMENTATION A decrease in the cost of failure and the prolifera- tion of data is driving some leaders to use purpose- ful experimentation to innovate faster and cheaper than ever before. CUSTOMER CENTRICITY With the wide variety of digital channels, there are more ways than ever for customers to interact with companies. Executives should strive to give consumers a seamless, consistent experience across all channels. CREATION OF A CHANGE-FRIENDLY CULTURE Organizations must rapidly adapt, yet most employees resist change. Now, more than ever, the successful leader must cultivate an atmosphere where change is not a frightening prospect.
  6. 6. skill 1—external focus — 6 “GLOBALIZATION HAS CHANGED US INTO A COMPANY THAT SEARCHES THE WORLD, NOT JUST TO SELL OR TO SOURCE, BUT TO FIND INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL — THE WORLD'S BEST TALENTS AND GREATEST IDEAS.” -Jack Welch It took Alexander Graham Bell 75 years to get 50 million people hooked on his product, the telephone. Dan Porter did it in 50 days. As the CEO of indie gaming company OMGPOP, Porter over- saw the development of Draw Something, an addictive doodling game for touchscreen devices. The app hit it big in early 2012, and the small company was soon snatched up by gaming giant Zynga, in a deal worth almost $200 million. There are a few lessons here that the observant executive could take away.     First, new channels to reach your customers are emerging more quickly than ever before. The telephone took a long time to catch on. Radio was a bit of an easier sell. TV, even easier than that, and so on. Fast forward to today, when a hot app can achieve massive market penetra- tion in a matter of days.
  7. 7. skill 1—external focus — 7 Secondly, it’s a fact that a dispro- portionate share of innovation is occurring at small companies, where a less rigid hierarchy and small teams of talented and high- ly-motivated employees are able to hatch new ideas quickly and cheaply. In fact, on a per-em- ployee basis, small companies generate 13 times as many patents as their larger counter- parts.11     Thirdly, technology is reduc- ing the transaction costs for external partnerships. Instead of developing products in-house, a potentially costly operation with no guarantee of success, larger companies are allowing smaller organizations to innovate, then partnering with and/or acquiring the little guy.     One company going full steam ahead with this strategy is General Electric. When GE was looking to expand its investment in renewable energy a few years ago, it used its venture capital arm to fund dozens of startups. As part of this, GE sponsored the Ecomagination Challenge, a competition for innovative green energy ideas and technol- ogies, with the winners receiving investment money. The company committed at least $300 million to the initiative, represent- ing a healthy 5% of their total renewable energy investments worldwide.12 Tips »  Designate a group to be responsible for relation ship building with the tech community »  Start early and small with new relationships »  Invest to help new, smaller partners navigate your larger organization 11 McKinsey, “Restarting the Small Business Growth Engine”, November 2012 12 $200 million in the U.S. and $100 million in China, out of a total of $6 billion invested in renewable energy
  8. 8. skill 2—management of open & fluid teams — 8 “A GOOD, QUICK, SMALL TEAM CAN BEAT A BIG, SLOW TEAM ANY TIME.” -Bear Bryant The digital world moves at a million miles an hour. Small, nimble teams are able to quickly respond to new information or customers’ needs. This speed can make all the difference when opportunities present themselves.     One such opportunity came in early 2013, when the lights went out at the New Orleans Superdome in the middle of the third quarter of the Super Bowl. A few minutes into the blackout, the official Twitter account for Oreo cookies sent out this: The impromptu ad was an immediate hit, impressing the
  9. 9. skill 2—management of open & fluid teams — 9 online hordes with its timeliness. It was all thanks to Oreo’s savvy social media strategy. In anticipation of the Super Bowl, they had set up a 15-person “war room” with ad agency personnel, copywriters, graphic artists, and brand strategists. When the lights went out, the team was able to react quickly and push the ad out over multiple channels.     The tweet ended up getting more glowing media attention than the traditional 30-second TV ad for which the company had paid $4 million13 . It also won the advertising firm both the Clio award and Grand Prix at the Cannes Lion, two of the industry’s highest honors. The effectiveness of the Oreo ad stemmed almost entirely from how quickly the team was able to get it out. Had Oreo posted even half an hour later, after the lights had been turned back on, it would have lost impact. If they had waited until the next day, and gone through the regular channels, waiting for approval every step of the way, it wouldn’t have been noticed at all. A traditional command and control structure would have been too slow in this case.            EXHIBIT Content decay happens fast. If people don’t see it in the first three hours, they’ll never see it.     » 90% of Facebook engagement happens in the first 3 hours of the post     » 92% of retweets happen within the first hour of the tweet 13 As Forbes wrote: “Lots of people are talking about the brand, and in glowing terms. And they’re doing it not in response to a multimillion-dollar ad that required months and many more more dollars to produce, but one that literally took minutes to create and run.” Tips »  Role model cross-functional cooperation »  Build “flex “capacity into the roles of your most valuable team members »  Create temporary project teams, not new organizations to launch new initiatives
  10. 10. skill 3—data-driven experimentation — 10 “I HAVE NOT FAILED. I'VE JUST FOUND 10,000 WAYS THAT WON'T WORK.” -Thomas A. Edison Large corporations have traditionally focused on avoiding failure, preferring to rely heavily on long planning cycles, focus groups and heavy investment in R&D before customers see a new product.     The great innovator Henry Ford pioneered speedy and efficient assembly line manufacturing, dominating the nascent automobile market with his Model T. But since even a small deviation in the manufacturing process could shut down the assembly line for days or weeks, Ford was reluctant to tinker with his original, proven 1907 design. He decided that the cost of experimentation was too high, that shutting down the assembly line to add features unproven with customers was too expensive. As a result, his company’s sales were ultimately surpassed by General Motors’ Chevrolet brand, which was more willing to embrace new exciting features for which consumers were clamoring, such as electric starters, hydraulic
  11. 11. skill 3—data-driven experimentation — 11 brakes, windshield wipers and luxurious interiors.     The technological and logistical barriers that prevented Ford from widespread experimentation no longer exist in the digital realm. In digital channels, the cost of failure is much lower, while feedback is received rapidly, and is more easily quantifiable.     Savvy executives, instead of trying to avoid failure entirely, have now realized that experimentation can lead to faster, cheaper innovation to meet customer needs. Instead of focusing on avoiding failure, these leaders focus on reducing the cost of failure, and putting in place the culture and systems to ensure lessons are learned, regardless of whether the experiment is a success or a failure.     Scott Cook, co-founder of software company Intuit, is one of the leading proponents of this process, which he helped usher into place at his company in the mid-2000s. He replaced the “huge teams” that worked on popular products like QuickBooks with smaller units of “no bigger than four” members. The focus became rapidly developing prototypes and releasing them, letting the market do their testing for them.     “We’re now focused on how many weeks after hatching the idea it takes to get the product into the hands of the customers, to test and see how it works,” Cook says. As a result, the length of Intuit’s development process went from a matter of years to a matter of months.14     General Electric, under CMO Beth Comstock, is another trailblazer in this data-focused, experimental approach. Comstock is a big proponent of the Silicon Valley mantra that failure is, counter-intuitively, a step toward ultimate success.     “One of the challenges is whether we can fail in the best way,” she says. “We don’t really have a lack of ideas, but execution is the problem because we want to be perfect, and that stymies us.”15     Instead of investing millions of dollars into a solution that 14 Techcrunch, Sept. 2011 15 Knowledge @Wharton, May 2013
  12. 12. skill 3—data-driven experimentation — 12 Tips »  Ask: “What is the fastest and cheapest way to test this?”, not “What is the answer?” »  Define safe experimentation boundaries in which employees can experiment without manager, legal or compliance approval »  After failures, focus on learning, not blame doesn’t get any traction, companies are beginning to use a more iterative, experiment- based product development process. This allows them to learn what customers value early in the process, with less capital invested, and make changes at a time when it’s less costly to do so, leading to innovation that is achieved faster and cheaper than ever before.
  13. 13. skill 4—customer centricity — 13 “THERE IS ONLY ONE BOSS. THE CUSTOMER. AND HE CAN FIRE EVERYBODY IN THE COMPANY FROM THE CHAIRMAN ON DOWN, SIMPLY BY SPENDING HIS MONEY SOMEWHERE ELSE.” -Sam Walton The digital age has given rise to a staggering variety of new channels for customers to inter- act with companies, channels that didn’t exist until relatively recently.     Consider that in the early 1990s a customer could reason- ably expect to interact with a company across three channels: a retail outlet, over the phone and possibly via a catalog that came in the mail. That was it. Flash forward 20 years and in addition to the aforementioned channels, companies now are expected to manage their brand on standard websites, mobile websites, phone apps, tablet apps, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest and YouTube, among countless others. With each new channel added, the complexity of manag- ing them rises exponentially. Along with increased number of channels, customer expectations have also risen. Consumers
  14. 14. skill 4—customer centricity — 14 demand that their experience across all the channels be con- sistent, seamless and integrated. This becomes challenging for companies in a time when it’s increasingly common for cus- tomers to jump around, hitting multiple channels over the course of a single transaction. Tips »  In every meeting, ask what your customers want, and listen to the answer »  Spend time learning how, why and when consumers engage through different devices and channels »  Align metrics and incentives with customers, not channels »  Learn fundamental UX skills »  Watch and listen to your customers. See how they are using different channels and adapt accordingly
  15. 15. skill 5—creation of a change-friendly culture — 15 “MANY LEADERS OF BIG ORGANIZATIONS, I THINK, DON'T BELIEVE THAT CHANGE IS POSSIBLE. BUT IF YOU LOOK AT HISTORY, THINGS DO CHANGE, AND IF YOUR BUSINESS IS STATIC, YOU'RE LIKELY TO HAVE ISSUES.” -Larry Page The pace of change is accelerating rapidly, leading to increased volatility across the entire corporate world. In 1958, the average tenure of a company in the S&P 500 was 62 years. Today that length of time has shrunk to 18 years.     The magnitude of change is felt strongly by employees.     A 2013 Adobe survey found that 76% of respondents agreed with the statement “Marketing has changed more in the last 2 years than in the last 50.” The survey (which Adobe titled “Digital Distress”) also found widespread anxiety in the face of all the change, with marketers expressing surprisingly low confidence in their own abilities and the strategy of their companies.     Gallup had similar results with a 2011 study, showing employees resistant to change and reluctant to take risks:
  16. 16. skill 5—creation of a change-friendly culture — 16 GALLUP EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT STUDY 2011 Responses to: “Why I’m hesitant to take risks at work” » 63% - Fear of the implications of failure/ lack of success » 27% - Lack of permission or support from my supervisor » 5% - No Hesitancy to try something new In the context of this faster pace of change, and the realization that many employees are not engaged, the successful leader must, more than ever, create the right culture: a culture that encourages employees to take smart risks and try new things. Executives should strive to create an atmosphere where change is not a frightening prospect. Tips »  Clarify your expectations for how employees need to deal with change »  Clarify your tolerance for failure: what type of failure is acceptable, what type isn’t »  Focus on consistency: employees with greater certainty about your reaction will be more likely to take the risks you want »  Role model change yourself: show yourself taking a risk
  17. 17. conclusion — 17 In this new digital age, the leaders of large companies that have a firm grasp and understanding of the forces that are shaping and disrupting the landscape will find themselves in an advantageous position. Simple awareness of the forces­ —­that devices will continue to get more both more advanced and ubiquitous, that connectivity and social networking and giant streams of data will continue to grow in importance in the lives of customers and employees alike —  isn’t enough. Executives need to master five new skills, so they can meet those forces head-on, and harness and mold them to their company’s advantage. The companies that are lucky enough to have strong leaders with the know-how, the foresight, and the determination to learn these skills, will be able to thrive in the digital era, and will find themselves well-prepared to innovate with an eye toward the rapidly-evolving future, for years and decades to come.
  18. 18. contact us General Assembly’s Enterprise Business provides practical online and offline education for executives, marketers and sales teams to help large organizations succeed in the digital age. To find out more, visit www.ga.co/enterprise

×