Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.

EPIC Report WEB 6_7

66 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

  • Your opinions matter! get paid BIG $$$ for them! START NOW!!.. ★★★ http://ishbv.com/surveys6/pdf
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • I made $2,600 with this. I already have 7 days with this... ▲▲▲ https://tinyurl.com/realmoneystreams2019
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • I made $2,600 with this. I already have 7 days with this... ●●● https://tinyurl.com/realmoneystreams2019
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Discover the secrets to getting a bigger penis naturally with this 100% free. ●●● https://tinyurl.com/ydaetwbk
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • I made $2,600 with this. I already have 7 days with this... ♥♥♥ http://ishbv.com/surveys6/pdf
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Gehören Sie zu den Ersten, denen das gefällt!

EPIC Report WEB 6_7

  1. 1. The world of difference Epic makes to the lives of children and young people
  2. 2. 2 Epic CIC Impact Report Epic CIC Impact Report 3 FROM THE MANAGING DIRECTOR, BRENDAN O’KEEFE When I first heard one of our young people say simply that we had made ‘the world of difference’ to their life, I was moved but I also understood exactly what they meant. INTRODUCTION 3 THE WORLD OF DIFFERENCE EPIC MAKES TO THE LIVES OF YOUNG PEOPLE 5 WHO WE ARE 6 METHODOLOGY 8 SPOTLIGHT ON EMPLOYABILITY 12 SPOTLIGHT ON HEALTH 16 SPOTLIGHT ON SERIOUS YOUTH VIOLENCE AND GANGS 20 SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION 24 SPOTLIGHT ON CITIZENSHIP AND PARTICIPATION 26 WHERE TO NOW 28 GET INVOLVED 31 That‘world of difference’is why we do what we do,and is what sets us apart in the eyes of young people,parents and our commissioners.Our 2015 Social Impact Report is the first time we have tried to capture in one place what that‘world of difference’looks and feels like. Since our launch in 2014,Epic’s ambitious strategy has sought to adapt to new funding realities, embed a social business culture and embrace reforms to public services as an opportunity to be bold and innovative. Young people overwhelmingly tell us we are making a world of difference to their lives.Of 576 young people we surveyed in 2015,99% reviewed their experience of Epic as being excellent,very good or good.Over the same period,we generated savings of £400,000 for our commissioners,and generated £1 million in external income creating significant added value. Building on that,we have worked with Baxendale to carry out a thorough examination of Epic’s social value.We have measured the impact of our employability,health,offending and volunteer programmes – activity which is vital to children and young people,our employee shareholders and the communities and funders we partner with.We have not just gathered robust and independently verified facts, but importantly the individual stories of lives where we have had significant positive impact. What this report has started to show us is the wider social value we are creating – and we are delighted with the results. This impact is down to all the Epic staff,volunteers, apprentices and trainees who made up our workforce in 2015,and with whom it is my enormous privilege to work.Their renewed sense of purpose since spinning out means Epic continues to deliver its social mission with children and young people,and surpass expectations. Our efforts are built on the foundation provided by our funders,including the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea,the Tri-Borough,West London CCG,local schools,the European Social Fund and the Cabinet Office. In addition to publishing a Social Impact Report this year,Epic have been awarded the Social Enterprise Mark,a respected international accreditation which proves you are in business to benefit society,community and the environment. As we move ahead,there can be no doubt that meaningful impact measurement,embedded at the heart of our strong and sustainable organisation,is key to creating better outcomes for our children and young people,encouraging potential and inspiring change. Brendan O’Keefe, Managing Director,Epic CIC,June 2016 Please note: The photographs used in this report are of Epic staff and service users,but are not necessarily related to the services they depict. Names have been changed for confidentiality reasons.
  3. 3. 4 Epic CIC Impact Report OUR IMPACT IN 2015 In 2015,Epic has shown we are a thriving social business creating value for young people and communities: As a social business,measuring the social value we create is central to the transparent way we operate,and communicate to our stakeholders. This report is an important milestone in examining how far we have come,as well as learning how we can improve in order to maximise the social value we generate in the future. We know from listening to young people and community groups,that Epic’s programmes help achieve outcomes that are meaningful to them. These include playing a positive role in their neighbourhood,and making more positive life choices. This report offers evidence that Epic’s unique model offers positive outcomes for young people alongside value for money to the state. By combining the insights from young people with validated impact measurement and evaluation tools1 ,we are now closer to evidencing the difference Epic makes to the lives of young people and the wider community. EPIC’S STORY SO FAR 2002 We start as an integrated youth support service in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea working with 11-24 year olds.  Connexions and Positive Activities programmes launch 2006 Secure investment from the Youth Opportunity and Capital Funds for programmes commissioned by,and for,young people 2009 Cited as good practice in the Mayor of London’s Youth Offer programme 2011 Awarded the“Hear by Right”Gold Standard for the participation of children and young people. Commissioned to support young people in Westminster,and Hammersmith and Fulham 2013 Epic Learning,our alternative provision school,opens its doors 2015 Earn new ISO,Social Enterprise Mark and Matrix accreditations showing Epic is a quality service provider TODAY We support more than 4,250 children,young people and adults aged between 6-25 years old 2005 School Sports,Youth Inclusion,Behaviour Improvement and Healthy Schools Programmes added to our offer 2008 Begin to deliver Targeted Youth Support through our Early Intervention programmes 2010 Launch our Youth Apprenticeship and Sports Traineeship programmes 2012 Epic’s employees vote unanimously to become an independent social business,and spin out of the Council 2014 Epic launches as a social business - safeguarding highly effective youth services and 165 skilled local jobs in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea 2016 Epic starts delivering the Community and Adventure Play services for the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea THE WORLD OF DIFFERENCE EPIC MAKES TO THE LIVES OF YOUNG PEOPLE In our 2015 Social Impact Report, we have made a significant effort to up our game when it comes to evaluating our social impact. These independent findings were made possible by support from Baxendale, funded through the Cabinet Office – Impact Readiness Fund. 1 Community investment values from the Social Value Bank,HACT and Daniel Fujiwara,www.socialvaluebank.org.Licensed by Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.en_GB) Epic CIC Impact Report 5 Delivering 199,535hours of group sessions with young people for every £1 Epic invested in employability support to young people, we created an extra Using Social Return on Investment Principles: through improvements in young people’s health and well-being, earnings and savings to the state for every £1 Epic invested in Serious Youth Violence programmes for young people, we created an extra of user’s attitudes or behaviour in relation to their own health and wellbeing Applying Economic Value on Investment principles, our volunteer programmes generated of value schools and academies across Kensington and Chelsea Supporting all Our Healthy Youth Centres were responsible for changing through improvements in young people’s health and well-being, earnings and savings to the state Our targeted employability programmes were responsible for of participants progressing to education, employment or training, and remaining in a positive destination for at least 3 months afterwards
  4. 4. Epic CIC Impact Report 7 Epic CIC’s Governance Structure Young people and Epic Staff Democratic bodies: Epic’s Youth Forum and Staff Council Board of Directors: 1 chair, 5 staff representatives, 2 young people and 4 non-executive directors Our vision is to: • To be acclaimed for the quality,impact and effectiveness of our work • To have highly motivated staff of the highest calibre with a passion for improving the lives of children and young people • To run an efficient,cost effective and sustainable enterprise and reinvest surpluses to further our mission • To be at the cutting edge of innovative practice • To involve our service users in the co-creation of services • To grow our enterprise and deliver high quality services across London and beyond Our value proposition Epic understands young people in London. In 2015,we engaged nearly 4,000 children and young people in universal and targeted settings. Our offer is highly integrated bringing together skilled professionals and quality facilities to deliver employability,sport,outdoor education,health and wellbeing provision, alternative education,disability services,arts, accreditation,citizenship,participation and programmes in serious youth violence.This is underpinned by the outstanding work of our Youth Centres. We launched as an employee-led social business in January 2014,spinning out from the Youth Support and Development Service of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.The creation of Epic has been a brave response to the changing landscape of public sector funding. We are leading the way in new approaches to financing and delivering services for children and young people that enrich the communities we operate in. We are employee and young person-led with both groups having a real say in the direction the organisation takes including board level representation.We believe this makes for happy and motivated employees and communities who feel a sense of ownership over Epic’s services.Together we are able to produce the very best in outcomes for children and young people. WHO WE ARE Epic’s mission is to inspire young people to achieve their potential and to make a positive difference to the communities in which we work.We work with children and young people living in London, up to the age of 19,and up to 25 through our targeted programmes. Our people Epic is nothing without our people.Our ability to deliver innovative youth services in challenging and difficult situations requires our staff and volunteers to have exceptional skill and operate creatively and collaboratively to get results. Our recruitment uses interviews based on practical demonstrations,and capability assessments involving both young people and our staff.We recruit for attitude against our attributes,and invest in training and coaching to ensure our workforce is appropriately skilled. We coach and manage our workforce to have the freedom to innovate and perform within clear parameters; to act,take initiative and responsibility. The breadth of Epic’s offer and their solid background in providing youth services means we are pleased to be working closely with them in relation to Early Help,Social Work and Looked After Children services. Clare Chamberlain, Interim Director of Children’s Services Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster City Council and London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham EPIC’S HIGHLY EFFECTIVE MODEL BRINGS TOGETHER 6 Epic CIC Impact Report OUR COMPREHENSIVE OFFER TO YOUNG PEOPLE OUR MULTI-DISCIPLINARY WORKFORCE CO-OWNERSHIP BY EMPLOYEES AND YOUNG PEOPLE EPIC IS UNIQUELY EQUIPPED TO SUPPORT YOUNG PEOPLE WITH COMPLEX NEEDS TO SHAPE THEIR OWN FUTURES, AND MAKE POSITIVE TRANSITIONS TO ADULTHOOD Our workforce development programme ensures we have highly qualified, skilled and competent people at every level of the business. Our staff tell us they are fulfilled in their roles, with 85% reporting they make good use of their skills and abilities, and 91% reporting they have clearly defined goals in their jobs according to our 2015 Partner Survey.
  5. 5. Epic CIC Impact Report 9 Life for young Londoners can be full of challenges.In the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea: • 24% of children under 16 are living in poverty, higher than national figures4 • Pressure on social housing stock and high property prices in London means 9.2% of households are living in overcrowded conditions5 Across London: • Almost one in seven children have not visited a green space in the last year6 • Fewer young people are on apprenticeships than other parts of England7 • The number of young people sleeping rough has increased by 40% since 2011/28 • 37.4% of 10-11 year olds are obese and one in ten children have mental health issues9 And in the UK: • The number of young adults living with their parents has increased bya quarter since 199610 • Young people are also more likely to be victims of crime,and nearly three times as likely to be unemployed,than adults Epic’s integrated model is designed to prevent the multiple risk factors that are associated with worklessness,poor health and criminal activity. Integrated services allow Epic to address on the holistic needs and interests of every child and young person,every step of the way to adulthood. Who we help To maximise our impact,Epic must reach the children and young people who most need our help.In 2015 we worked with a variety of vulnerable and at-risk groups of children and young people. Why integrated youth services? In order to set the context for Epic’s social impact report,we started by identifying some of the key challenges that young people face in society today.The Young Foundation observes children and young people“are living,learning and negotiating transitions to adulthood and independence in an increasingly complex and challenging world,in which they face greater levels of choice and opportunity,but also unprecedented uncertainty and risk.This calls for empowered, resilient children and young people,who play an active role in navigating these paths.”3 £24.7m5,044childrenandyoungpeople intotal2 1,647Deprivedchildren andyoungpeople 23Youngparentsorpregnant youngwomen 48Youngpeopleatriskofsubstance misuseorinafamilywhere substancesaremisused 65Youngpeopleinvolvedin,oratriskof,serious youthviolence,anti-socialbehaviour, gangsorsexualexploitation 34Lookedafterchildren,careleavers oryoungcarers 161Childrenandyoungpeoplewith adisabilityand/orlifelong learningdisability 174YoungPeoplenotineducation, employmentortraining, oratriskof 2,892BlackandMinorityEthnicchildrenandyoungpeople METHODOLOGY Customer journey mapping and feedback Many children and young people benefit from a cross section of the services we provide. During 2015,each child or young person attended our programmes on average 8 times and 20.4% used 3 or more different services.11 8 Epic CIC Impact Report 4 JSNA 2013/4 5 Census 2011 6 Natural England Report 2015 7 BIS 2015 8 Centrepoint 2014 9 PHE 2014 10 ONS 2014 11 From a randomly selected sample of 250 young people Epic worked with in 2015. 389took part in Epic’s Employability programmes 260took part in Epic’s Disability programmes 120took part in Epic’s Health and Wellbeing programmes 122took part in Epic’s Serious Youth Violence programmes 285took part in Epic’s Citizenship and Participation programmes 1,543took part in Epic’s Sports and Outdoor programmes 1,324took part in Epic’s Youth Centre activities 322took part in Epic’s Performing Arts and Duke of Edinburgh programmes 2 Total here is more than the total number of young people seen in 2015 because they can belong to more than one commissioned group 3 Young Foundation,Framework of outcomes for Young People,2012 The Children and Young People Epic Support Epic Programmes
  6. 6. 10 Epic CIC Impact Report We surveyed 576 young people who used our services during 2015 to ask about the difference attending Epic’s services had made to them. Their feedback told us we are making a significant positive impact to help young people realise their potential. Top four reasons young people value our services: 1. To learn and improve my skills 2. To meet new people 3. Just something to do / stop me getting bored 4. To help my local community We also asked why young people value our services to ensure our offer is relevant and provides value for money to commissioners, investors and communities. 84%agreed 60%agreed 53%agreed 42%agreed Epic’s Theory Of Change In 2015,we developed our Theory of Change for Epic’s Youth Services.This forms the backbone of our social impact measurement system.It links our comprehensive range of day to day activities across the organisation to a coherent set of short,medium and long term outcomes and Epic’s overall mission.It has been co-designed in workshops and consultation with our frontline staff,young people,and social impact experts. Capturing evidence In this report,we present evidence from a range of sources including individual examples and case studies alongside statistical evidence and Return On Investment calculations.This aims to convey the real change that children and young people experience in their lives after participating on an Epic programme or programmes. Our findings are structured around the four programme areas where we believe,and our young people tell us we are making some the greatest difference to their lives. ACTIVITIES KEY SUCCESS FACTORS OUTPUTS SHORT-MEDIUM TERM OUTCOMES LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OVERARCHING AIM Service users know about and want to use Epic’s offer Epic staff adapt activities to suit service user needs Epic staff effectively engage with service users and build trusting relationships There is sufficient upfront risk assessment and on-going needs assessment Epic staff are able to ensure a safe, welcoming and fun space Appropriate facility access available to host provision Epic staff are well trained and skilled to carry out their respective roles Epic staff identify and nurture talent of service users they support Children and young people’s attitudes and behaviour will be challenged Every child and young person who participates in an Epic service receives an introduction and is signposted to the wider relevant services Every child and young person who participates in an Epic service is invited to become a member, and participate in decision-making at Board level Epic’s integrated range of open access, targeted and specialist Youth and Play services Epic service users aged 6-25 from identified localities and vulnerable commissioned target groups Number of qualified staff; Number of young person and volunteers Numbers of: Learning hours; Accreditations (including levels); Sessions; Events, Service Users and attendances; Service Users from commissioned target groups; Referrals to/from Early Help and other partner agencies. Service users have an improved understanding of their role in the community Service users develop learning, education and employment readiness Service users develop social and emotional capabilities Service users who exhibit challenging behaviour moderate their actions Service users have knowledge about risky behaviours Service users have increased their aspirations to work to help them develop transferable professional skills Service users more regularly participate in sporting and physical activity and live healthier lifestyles Service users have increased engagement in positive activities that offer an alternative to offending Service users play a positive role in the community More service users in employment, education and training Service users have improved health and wellbeing Service users make more positive life choices Service users are less involved in a serious youth crime or antisocial behaviour Fewer service users access high cost, specialist statutory services Children are more ready to transition to primary and secondary school Service users achieve their potential and make a positive difference to their community EPIC YOUTH Centre-based youth work Detached youth work Targeted youth work Citizenship and participation EPIC AMBITION Epic learning school Targeted youth support Employability and careers training EPIC PLAY Adventure community play Play rangers Targeted play Young volunteers and participation EPIC SPORTS, HEALTH AND WELLBEING Individual and team sports and outdoor education Information, advice and guidance on health, sex, LGBT and wellbeing issues Support for young people affected by substance misuse Sports coaching and qualifications 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 Confidence Happiness Feelings about the future Emotional health Awareness of rights Knowledge of where to get help Understanding of positive community role played Behaviour Ability to cope with challenging situations Physical health Improved a lot Improved a bit Stayed the same Got worse Epic CIC Impact Report 11 EPIC’S YOUNG PERSONS ANNUAL SURVEY 2015 Epic’s Theory of Change Young People’s Survey Results
  7. 7. Epic CIC Impact Report 13 PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS Epic Learning Excluded children are three times more likely than their peers to leave school with no qualifications,and half as likely to get a degree12 . At Epic,we want to turn that around. Epic Learning is our inclusive,alternative education provision for Year 10-13 students who would not thrive in mainstream education and are in danger of exclusion.The varied curriculum comprises academic and personal development options including 12 GCSE,Functional Skills and Vocational Qualifications.100% of Epic Learning’s students achieved at least one GCSE or equivalent qualification at Key Stage 4 and 5 in the 2014/5 academic year.This compares well to 58% GCSE or equivalent qualification attainment of alternative provision schools across London. Break4U Teenage parents are nearly 3 times more likely to be NEET.13 Our Break4U programme combines group and 1:1 work with young mums to raise their ambitions for further education,training or employment and develop the social conduct and functional skills needed to thrive. Recognising the barriers young mums face to economic participation,Break4U includes sessions on financial management,sustaining positive social support circles and having a greater understanding of the impact of substance misuse,crime and domestic violence. Typical of Epic’s integrated services,individuals can access a free crèche,CV and interview skills workshops,AQAs and accreditations.In its ninth year,the Break4U Duke of Edinburgh Expedition for Mums and their infants resulted in the group achieving bronze Duke of Edinburgh awards. OUR APPROACH Epic’s employability programmes help to build young people’s learning,education and employment readiness.This combines increasing aspirations to work with transferable professional skills. Our expertise engaging with highly diverse and often challenged groups of young people – including young parents,young offenders and care leavers – ensures we have the skills, expertise and trust to get the best out of the most disengaged young people. Our approach is tailored to each individual, ensuring they stand the best chance of reaching a destination that is sustainable for them.This takes a long term approach helping them avoid cycling in and out of being NEET,and the disadvantage this creates later in life. Epic provides holistic support for young people who are not in education, employment or  training. Their support and guidance package enables young people to realise their aspirations and move into appropriate learning or work.  Their ongoing support enables young people to progress in their careers and avoid longer term unemployment,with its wider social impact on young people,their families and the community. Sandy Cotton, Director, CLC Building Futures We support employability through: • Intensive 1:1 and specialist programmes for young people Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) or at risk of NEET • Homegrown Apprenticeships,Traineeships and Volunteer programmes • Epic Learning,our Ofsted registered school • Our Careers,Education,Information,Advice and Guidance service in local schools,colleges and Epic’s Youth Centres 12 Epic CIC Impact Report EMPLOYABILITY SPOTLIGHT ON In 2015 we supported 68 Princes Trust placements, 32 volunteerships, 20 apprenticeships and 8 traineeships.Our integrated model enables young people to access accreditation and gain qualifications across all our programmes,not just those focussed on employability. 12 NPC,Misspent Youth 2007 13 Audit Commission 2010 In an innovative partnership between Epic,the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea,London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham,the European Social Fund and employers,we provide employability programmes that meet the needs and aspirations of learners and job seekers. In 2015, we facilitated Level 1-2 accreditations, equivalent to a GCSE qualification Our employability programmes were responsible for of participants progressing to education, employment or training, and remaining in a positive destination for at least 3 months afterwards
  8. 8. 14 Epic CIC Impact Report Epic CIC Impact Report 15 Investing in the wider community Epic is deeply committed to tackling deprivation. We pay at or above the London Living wage as standard for all our staff. In 2015 we supported 7 local adults (over 25) who wanted to give something back,and gain workplace relevant skills to volunteer with us. Volunteers Our volunteers do incredible things for their communities and for Epic.Placements are typically 2 days a week for 12 weeks. In 2015 Epic’s volunteers gave 18,432 hours of their time, generating an incredible £43,315 of equivalent value.91% of our volunteers gained a vocational qualification and 96% went into employment,education or training. Apprenticeships In 2015,Epic facilitated 20 apprenticeships with young people gaining a Level 2 or 3 vocational qualification across sports coaching,business administration,plumbing,childcare and creative arts sectors as part of a 12-18 months work placement. Since January 2014,88% of placements have either completed their apprenticeship or are ongoing – well above the national rate of 68%14 .Epic’s extensive employer networks supported the placement of apprentices in 23 different organisations,increasing the choice of placements relevant to a young person’s chosen career path. We are always looking for new ways to bring together recruiting employers,training providers, colleges,universities and young people to provide the best possible opportunities. Meshach started accessing Epic’s services by discovering canoeing and trampolining at the Canalside Centre. Fuelled by his love of sports he started paddling with Epic’s Watersports Team from the age of 9, participating in white water residentials, gaining sports qualifications, all the time improving his team working and confidence. At 10, he competed in the London Youth Games representing his borough. However, by 14, Meshach had lost his way.He was drawn to the wrong crowd and started getting suspended from school. It was at this point that Meshach re-engaged with Epic’s coaches and started to think seriously about his future. Realising he wanted to do something to benefit others, the Epic team encouraged him to start volunteering as a Sports Coaching Assistant at Canalside. After finishing his GCSEs, Meshach went to his Connexions officer who helped him to identify career options. This prompted a Level 2 Youth Work Apprenticeship hosted by Epic. “My Mum was so happy, as she wanted me to use my talents for something worthwhile.” “The hardest thing about the apprenticeship was going to college, I had always struggled with writing. But Epic provided me with 1:1 mentors who helped me make a plan, think through and review my sessions, and I took it in my stride.” Meshach went on to be accepted onto a Level 3 Youth Work Apprenticeship. This required a formal selection process, presenting to a panel of youth workers on why he deserved a job. To calculate the overall social value generated through our employability support, we have used the Social Return on Investment (SROI) method. SROI is an approach used to understand the impact of an organisation’s activities. It measures the changes to people and communities and gives them a financial value. This showed that for every £1 Epic invested in employability support in 2015, an additional £2.24 in social value was generated through improvements to young people’s confidence, wealth and savings to the state. £1 £2.24 for every in social value Epic invested in employability support in 2015 “I was expected to step up the level of responsibility I had, to deliver my own sessions, and I thrived on that.” This confidence prompted Meshach to go beyond what was expected. He identified that increasing levels of local young people were driving mopeds illegally and established compulsory bike training to address this which became popular. Whilst on the apprenticeship, he also gained new health training qualifications, going on to lead Healthy Living sessions at two Youth Centres. “The best bit was when Epic arranged for us to go to Jamie Oliver’s Restaurant Fifteen, which has been a big inspiration for me when teaching cooking in youth centres and eating well at home.” Three years on and Meshach is now employed by Epic as a full-time Outdoor Education Worker. He has completed silver and gold Duke of Edinburgh Awards, become a course assessor, as well as holding kayaking accreditations. Epic has opened other doors to Meshach revealing potential he didn’t know he had. Meshach has gone onto paddle with the GB kayaking development squad, and won a place at Camp America. I don’t think I would have done any of this without Epic.At 14 I was getting into lots of trouble but I stepped back from that life because of people believing in me.The difference between where I am today, and some of my friends who took a different path, and are in and out of prison, is massive. Today Meshach is mentoring young people who use Epic’s sports and outdoor education facilities, and inspiring them to think about their potential, and a career in sports leadership. 14 2013/4 figure,the latest year’s data to be published. we created an extra
  9. 9. 16 Epic CIC Impact Report Epic CIC Impact Report 17 PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS Healthy Youth Centres Epic’s Healthy Youth Centres (HYCs) provide a 12 week programme based on local public health priorities,NHS best practice and young people’s needs,based in locations widely used by young people,with the highest levels of health inequalities. Epic’s Health Rooms are a key feature – taking a preventative and early intervention approach - including on the spot health and fitness checks, STI screening,condom distribution,sex and relationship advice,art therapies and massage, and signposting and referrals to wider services. With growing demands on the NHS system, Epic’s health programmes aim to build resilience in young people’s health and wellbeing. 88% of HYC users said their knowledge of a wide range of health and wellbeing topics had improved, and 81% said their attitudes or behaviour had changed in relation to their own health and wellbeing. Hidden Harm Project Epic’s values mean that we work to meet needs that would otherwise go unmet.Despite an estimated 2.6 million children being affected by parental or familial alcohol misuse in the UK, the majority of programmes do not address the needs of children and young people.Epic’s Hidden Harm project supports 5-18 year olds in Kensington and Chelsea affected by parental substance and alcohol misuse. Epic Health offers a wide range of advice,guidance,health and wellbeing programmes to young people,in locations they want to access,designed around their wants and needs. OUR APPROACH Funded by the NHS Central West London CCG, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and Tri-borough Public Health,Epic’s programmes ensure young people gain knowledge about risky behaviours,live healthier lifestyles,and develop their emotional and social capabilities. This supports them to make positive life choices, and enjoy improved health and wellbeing. Epic delivers these programmes in partnership with the John Hunter Sexual Health Clinic, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital,local GPs, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Schools,Insight KC,and local campaigns like ‘Go Golborne’. In 2015 we embedded our Health Programmes in our Youth Centres to widen access for young people.The Health Team delivered 352 learning hours with young people through health and wellbeing related workshops,events,training and consultations - a 29% increase on 2014. Young people traditionally don’t want to access support for their health and wellbeing needs in clinical settings.Epic have proven particularly effective at putting the young person at the centre of design and delivery of health services so they actively want to use,and get the best out of them.This means young people get the help they need in an informal,non-stigmatising environment from skilled professionals that they trust and can get the health support they need. Steve Buckerfield, Head, Tri-Borough Children’s Joint Commissioning In 2015 Epic Health included: • Healthy Youth Centres and Health Rooms integrated in our open access Youth Clubs • Hidden Harm Programme for those affected by parental substance and alcohol misuse • Relationship and Sex Education (RSE) service based on a curriculum created in partnership with local providers • Emotional and mental health,drug and alcohol programmes • Workforce development for local professionals on RSE programmes and co-ordinating the public health training for the Tri-borough • The Umbrella Project for LGBTQQI youth 16 Epic CIC Impact Report HEALTH SPOTLIGHT ON Significant health interventions with children and young people Surveys of more than 100 users of our Healthy Youth Centres show 96% found our sex and relationships advice useful,86% found our information and support on emotional health and wellbeing useful,and 87% found our information and support on drugs,alcohol and tobacco useful.
  10. 10. 18 Epic CIC Impact Report Epic CIC Impact Report 19 Epic’s Hidden Harm project engages year olds in Kensington and Chelsea Hidden Harm Project continued We provide intensive 1:1 support to enable children and young people to develop coping strategies,become more resilient and break inter-generational patterns of substance misuse. The project runs group activities so children and young people develop support networks and reduce their isolation.The children and young people referred are some of the most vulnerable in the borough,and require significant child protection expertise and engagement to achieve positive outcomes.In 2015,of those on the Hidden Harm programme,30% lived in Care or with a Guardian,82% have experienced or witnessed domestic abuse,91% are affected by mental health issues,and all had been on a Child Protection,Child in Need or Adolescent at Risk registers in the year prior. During 2015,the programme worked with 31 children and young people for between 8 weeks and 12 months plus.Epic worked alongside multi-agency partners to take a whole family approach to child protection and parental substance misuse.Epic’s Hidden Harm Worker delivered 85 advocacy sessions with parents, explaining the impact parental substance was having on their child. In 2015,8 children and young people supported by Epic’s Hidden Harm programme moved off their Child Protection Plan or equivalent register, and 11 parents moved into treatment or remained in recovery. To capture the social value of these programmes we looked at both cost savings to the state and the outcomes experienced by young people. For example,if we consider a child on a Child Protection Plan costs on average £10,538 a year15 and the cost of heroin and crack users not in treatment costs on average £26,074 a year16 ,we can start to see the significant He was 15 years old when was referred to the Hidden Harm project in 2015, having experienced serious domestic violence within his family home as well as being affected by parental alcohol misuse from childhood. Aaron had been known to Families and Children Services for years, but his Mum had always resisted support from Social Workers and the Police. Aaron was in Special Education provision when Epic’s Hidden Harm Worker started to support him.He described being angry at Primary School and unable to articulate his feelings,getting into conflict with other children and teachers.He suggested he had been threatened by his Mum not to say anything to professionals about the abuse at home,and this has led to him feeling even more upset.Aaron has dyslexia,and was largely unable to read or write when he started Secondary School. His frustration was escalating before he was referred to Epic. Epic’s Hidden Harm Worker started to support Aaron in one to one sessions several times a week,to develop a trusting relationship and get him to speak openly about his experiences. In time,Aaron spoke about having suicidal thoughts relating to his circumstances and for the first time was able to detail incidents of serious domestic violence he’d been experiencing. Early on,Aaron spoke about not being able to sleep due to music being played loudly all night.He talked about his brother who has been in prison on drug related charges,and serious gang involvement,and spoke of his determination to make a better life for himself.The Hidden Harm project worked closely with Families and Children Services throughout Aaron’s engagement as he was extremely resistant to talk to professionals.Together they were able to support Aaron to consider alternatives to living in the family home,supporting his decision to move out and live independently. Throughout the programme, Aaron and his Epic worker used Narrative Therapy to help Aaron separate himself from the alcohol abuse and domestic violence.A mixture of one to one and group sessions focussed on maximising Aaron’s skills and ability to feel confidence in himself, and his future.As a result,Aaron was better able to deal with the abuse he had encountered and minimise suicidal thoughts. Aaron remains on the Hidden Harm programme and is reporting much improved emotional well-being.He has continued working towards completing his final year at school,and has accessed extra courses in mechanics and photography.He will be starting college in September 2016. Epic has helped me from when I was feeling really depressed,had suicidal thoughts and self- harmed.I wanted to move away because of alcohol abuse and I felt I couldn’t take it anymore.Moving away was a lot easier than I expected it to be and it was a relief to know I could get out and not put up with it anymore.My Epic Worker has been very supportive for me and been there when I needed to talk about problems.He helped me realise my options and that there is another way.I now have a chance to get on with life and I am focused on study,doing mechanics and photography and going to cadets instead of being stuck in the same situation feeling hopeless. 15 DCLG Cost Calculator 2010 16 National Treatment Agency 2011. of children and young people felt they had improved or maintained their rating about ‘feelings’ of children and young people felt they had improved or maintained their rating about ‘family and friends of children and young people felt they had improved or maintained their rating about ‘behaviour’ of children and young people felt they had improved or maintained their rating about ‘growing up’ of children and young people felt they had improved or maintained their rating about ‘me’ Hidden Harm project impact impact this programme is having on behalf of Social Services,NHS,Police,Mental Health and Community Safety Teams across London. Alongside this we aimed to also capture the individual difference our support makes to children and young people’s lives.The diagram below illustrates how the programme improves the outcomes experienced by young people themselves.
  11. 11. Epic CIC Impact Report 21 PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS The Alternative Carnival Engagement (ACE) project supports young people on the fringe of gang and criminal activity who are likely to become a victim or to be drawn further into criminal activity through the local Notting Hill Carnival event.Epic deliver a targeted programme during the school holidays in the run up to the Carnival to reduce the chance of young people offending,causing harm to others or to themselves.This aims to increase young people’s confidence to get involved in positive activities and peer groups. In 2015,Epic worked with 10 young men over 3 months,supporting them to develop alternatives to high-risk lifestyles including progression routes to education,employment or training,and personal and social development exercises.6 of the 10 also participated on a week-long residential programme accessing outdoor adventure activities.None offended during the Carnival itself. In 2014 the Home Office named the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea an ‘emerging gangs borough’.Epic responded by developing specialist Serious Youth Violence (SYV) and Gangs programmes to help young men and women aged 12-25 turn their lives around and contribute to their communities. OUR APPROACH Our holistic SYV programmes work to reduce the seriousness and frequency of youth offending, and address its underlying causes.We do this by putting in place support packages that improve young people’s health and wellbeing,improve their participation in education and employment, and help them make more positive life choices. In 2015, Epic worked with 122 young people classed as involved with gangs, or at risk of Serious Youth Violence. In partnership with the Metropolitan Police, Family Services, Probation, and the Tri-Borough Youth Offending Teams and local Housing Associations, Epic delivers Serious Youth Violence programmes including: • Keywork with young men already known to the Criminal Justice System • Keywork for young women to prevent crime and build esteem • The Alternative Carnival Engagement Project • Autumn Nights outreach and diversionary work • Careers,Education,Information,Advice and Guidance for young offenders and 1:1 support in the borough’s Youth Offending Team SERIOUS YOUTH VIOLENCE AND GANGS SPOTLIGHT ON 20 Epic CIC Impact Report exited onto employment, education or training opportunities of the young men had no known offending in the 12 months post interventions. were at a reduced risk of substance misuse Epic’s Serious Youth Violence programmes are well respected and their youth workers have proven they can engage the hardest to reach young men and women involved in gangs.Epic have played a role in partnership with police and other agencies in tackling gangs and youth violence.Their work has contributed to making the Royal Kensington and Chelsea Borough a safer place and helped reduced the incidents of serious youth violence. Detective Inspector Driss Hayoukane, Metropolitan Police Service Epic has placed a full time targeted youth support worker within our Youth Offending Team since July 2014.We are particularly pleased with the way in which their worker is fully integrated into the team and works with young people who are in receipt of juridical outcomes and are NEET.  A  key indicator of success has been an average of 86% of the cohort being in suitable education or employment at the close of their orders between July 2014 and March 2016. Mark Downie, Deputy Manager, Youth Offending Team, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Serious Youth Violence Outcomes
  12. 12. Epic CIC Impact Report 2322 Epic CIC Impact Report In 2015,Epic’s Keyworkers became aware Youssef was starting to demonstrate risky behaviours and getting arrested.He had recently experienced two life changing events when he was diagnosed with a brain tumour,and his father died.This worsened his involvement in crime,and vulnerability to exploitation by local gangs. Youssef confided in his youth workers he was increasingly involved in unsafe sex,drug dependency,debt and escalating offending as a fledging gang member.Without a job or relationship with his family,Youssef felt he had nothing to lose. Epic’s keyworker raised Youssef’s case at a multidisciplinary team meeting,recognising the support Youssef needed was long term.This resulted in an intensive action plan for Youssef,led by Epic’s Young Men’s keyworker experienced in supporting those involved in gangs and criminal activity,and the personal coaching required to get Youssef’s life back on track. sports events and volunteering twice a week at one of Epic’s Youth Centres.Epic’s Detached Youth Work team offered mentoring support to Youssef, helping him to seek treatment for his substance misuse and signposting him to a local young person’s drug and alcohol programme to reduce his anxiety and consumption levels. Epic’s keyworker encouraged Youssef to start working out and taught him about eating a healthy,balanced diet and home cooking to help his recovery. Overall Youssef has massively reduced his risky behaviour over the past 18 months,but remains vulnerable to coercion. He was arrested at the end of 2015 for a drug related offence but has been bailed,rather than sent to custody,because of the dramatic turnaround in his behaviour.He now sees his keyworker once or twice a week to mentor him and help him remain in work,college, and away from offending. Epic’s support is still active and will continue until Youssef can operate independently. The support programme needed Youssef’s buy-in to make it effective.The first task was to support Youssef with his health as he refused to attend appointments for treatment since his diagnosis.Youssef’s keyworker supported him intensively in the first month of working together to build him up to the decision to accept chemotherapy,attending hospital appointments with him throughout,and engaging his family to do the same.Youssef responded well to treatment and he showed a willingness to make positive changes in his life for the first time as an adult. Epic’s Ambitions Team facilitated Youssef getting a place at Further Education College,as well as accessing part time work as a steward at An Social Return on Investment calculation of Epic’s Serious Youth Violence programmes demonstrated that in 2015 for every £1 invested, £3.59 of additional social value was generated through improvements to young people’s health and wellbeing, safety, earning potential and savings to the state. Young Men’s and Young Women’s Keywork These projects engage young men and women involved in anti-social behaviour,serious youth violence and gangs for up to 12 months through a bespoke programme.This includes accredited personal development opportunities,sports and arts activities,employability opportunities and health and wellbeing interventions,delivered in 1:1 and group work settings. The Young Men’s Keywork project emphasises issues such as mediation and conflict resolution,and is geared towards diverting and de-escalating offending. The Young Women’s Keywork project recognises females are more likely to be the victims of serious youth violence and sexual exploitation. This emphasises developing young women into peer educators,building a positive identity, improving self-esteem and making responsible and educated life choices. £1 £3.59 for every EPIC created an extra in social value invested in Serious Youth Violence projects Youssef is 19 and lives in a North Kensington neighbourhood which has the highest density of crime, unemployment and social housing in the borough. He comes from a family involved with local criminal and gang activity. Youssef’s Keyworker
  13. 13. Epic CIC Impact Report 25 Sport also provides invaluable opportunities for young people to play a positive role in their communities,and represent their boroughs in competitive events.In 2015 Epic Sports and Arts Teams were responsible for facilitating flagship events in the borough. PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS 1,543 young people accessed Epic’s outstanding Sports and Outdoor services in 2015.More than a third were repeat users.40% of young people who accessed Epic’s sports services were from the 20% most deprived neighbourhoods in the borough.These young people are most in need of the chance to regularly participate in sports, physical activity and healthier lifestyles,and will benefit most from engagement in positive activities including routes to employment and diversions from offending. Epic’s trainee football and basketball coaching schemes are a great example of how Epic Sports programmes contribute towards young people’s employability outcomes. Over 12 weeks,our trainee coaching schemes works with aspiring young coaches aged 16-26, providing vocational training and a minimum wage.Trainees participate in a work-based learning programme providing young coaches with the key skills and attributes to becoming a positive young coach.Young people go on to local sports apprenticeships at NVQ Level 2 and part-time employment opportunities with a host of local sports and leisure providers.In 2015, our Sports Coaching Bursary Scheme resulted in 35 young people gaining a Level 1 National Governing Body qualification. Since we opened in 2014 Epic has been a trusted community partner facilitating our after-school enrichment programme and providing excellent support for our students and young people from the wider community.We really value the work Epic delivers because it is always done in an efficient and positive way,it complements our PE curriculum and has had a great impact on the physical and emotional wellbeing of students.So much so that many of our students will now go onto represent the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea at the London Youth Games and London School Games. Anna Jordan, Vice Principal, Kensington and Aldridge Academy In 2015 Epic Sport was delivered through: • Sports and Outdoor Activity sessions during term times and school holidays • Disability Sport and Arts Programmes • The London School Games and London Youth Games • Coach Education and Training • PE and Sports Services to Schools • Duke of Edinburgh Awards SPORTS AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION SPOTLIGHT ON young people accessed Epic's outstanding Sports and Outdoor offer and facilities in 2015 24 Epic CIC Impact Report 900 children and young people from 23 Primary Schools competing in Epic’s Primary School Games Festival at Westway Sports Centre 412 young people competing in Mini Marathon Trials at Holland Park 210 young people performing in Epic’s Dance Showdown event at Cadogan Hall 260 children and young people from the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea represented their borough in the London Youth Games The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea ranked in London’s top 10 for 14 Olympic sports as part of the London Youth Games in 2015. Epic’s Sport and Outdoor Education programmes provide children and young people with access to a range of unique sporting opportunities including regular weekly sessions,competitive events and coach education and training delivered at community sports venues across the borough. Sports and Arts Events
  14. 14. 26 Epic CIC Impact Report Epic CIC Impact Report 27 Shamime is 17 and a Member of Youth Parliament for Kensington and Chelsea. She first got involved with Epic’s Programmes when youth workers ran Citizenship and Participation workshops in her school on broadcasting and the importance of voting. This sparked Shamime’s interest in politics, making her think about how laws are made, and engaging opinion-makers. During 2015,Shamime became active in Epic’s Youth Forum when her family were rehoused, and she wanted to positively contribute to her community. She began volunteering at one of Epic’s Youth Centres because of the opportunities she saw for young people to make their voices heard via Epic’s Youth Forum.Since becoming a Youth Forum member,Shamime has participated in London Citizens, Youth Parliament and Mayoral campaigns on the housing crisis,racism,and is fundraising for young homeless people in London.She has also met with elected Councillors to give testimony on the over- crowding affecting households in Kensington and Chelsea. Epic’s Youth Forum workers have been brilliant at facilitating us to gain hands-on experience fundraising,executing campaigns and raising awareness to help young people on the issues that matter.It’s great because they have helped me work out what I want to do with my life. In July 2015,Shamime’s passion for getting young people politically empowered,and positively connected to their communities,led to her going on an international youth exchange to Greece. Young people took the lead in preparation for the trip as well as managing budgets and producing itineraries. The highlight for Shamime was attending a peaceful demonstration in Syntagma Square to understand the political views shaping historic events in Athens,and young people’s roles in leading social justice campaigns. After the Youth Exchange Shamime was recognised by her peers at Epic’s Apollo Awards, for the leadership she showed supporting Greek young people who were less confident speaking English. “One impact that Epic has had on my life is raising my belief in myself.It has also made me more aware that I can take part in fixing and raising awareness in any problems that young people experience today.” Now studying for her A-Levels, Shamime is using Epic’s Youth Forum as a blueprint to set up an equivalent for British-Iraqi Young People in London. “Epic has definitely helped me take the next steps in pursuing a degree and career in politics, and developing my ability as a performer.Eventually,I want to be the UK’s first ever Beatboxing MP!” PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS In 2015,Epic delivered 6,330 learning hours across our citizenship,participation and community volunteering programmes.We managed young people’s involvement in the United Kingdom Youth Parliament (UKYP) locally,regionally and nationally, and co-ordinated UKYP elections and the Make Your Mark annual ballot to enable young people from across the borough to have an opportunity to stand for election,vote and get empowered! In the 2015 Make Your Mark ballot, Kensington and Chelsea’s turnout saw 4,604 young people aged 11-18 voting, a 32% increase on the previous year. We supported international citizenship and democracy projects that raise personal,social and cultural awareness. I’m really impressed with the positive impact Epic’s Citizenship and Participation team have made to our pupil’s lives inside the classroom. Epic have delivered a number of programmes here at our school including Politics and Local Government; European Citizenship; Financial Citizenship; Young People and the Law,and Ethics and Young People.All of which have been important to get students to understand their rights and responsibilities in civic society. Craig Spence-Hill, PSHE Citizenship Co-ordinator and Computer Science Teacher, The Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School Epic’s Citizenship and Participation Team trained young people to air their views,co-design services and represent their peers in democratic debates via our Young Inspectors and British Youth Council residentials,and young person designed and delivered events on safety,rights and citizenship. We also delivered Curriculum for Life and Financial Management workshops in local primary and secondary schools. CITIZENSHIP AND PARTICIPATION SPOTLIGHT ON In July 2015, thanks to support from Eurasmus+, Epic facilitated a 15 week Youth Exchange programme that brought 30 young people together to explore quality of life, social rights and optimism for the future felt by young people in London and Athens. This residential changed the lives of those who participated, some of whom had never travelled out of the UK, were NEET and/ or from low income families. The cultural exchange developed young people’s competencies and confidence in setting learning goals, researching and giving presentations on European citizenship, practical problem solving, and taking part in a group discussions and evaluation. £12,967 Epic invested from its Youth Grants Fund in youth-led community projects, as well as fighting hardship and funding new skills for local young people. In November 2015,Epic’s youth forum“Youth Voice” hosted the Apollo Awards,a celebration of young people’s achievements in the borough.This event was fully youth-led with young people deciding the categories,nominating,judging and hosting the event,which was attended by 62 young people and their families.
  15. 15. 28 Epic CIC Impact Report SPOTLIGHT ON PARTNERSHIPS Our partnerships foster new ways of working with funders,community groups and businesses who share our vision for sustainability,social impact and innovation,and want to make the world a better place for children and young people. To that end,we pilot new programmes,invest in new delivery models for better public services, and look to secure new sources of income and investment.In 2015,our partnerships included: Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea The Director of Commissioning for Children’s Services inspection of Epic in 2015 found that our “activities were well planned,staff were clear about the outcomes young people needed to achieve,and outcomes were being delivered and evidenced.Young people were well engaged and happy to share their experiences.” Epic achieved £1.1m of cashable savings for our primary commissioner since 2012 while continuing to provide a vibrant youth support service.Epic’s partnership with officers across the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea continues to be strengthened by the social value we generate with local communities. Target key beneficiaries better Ambition 1 Epic is facilitating a growing number of volunteerships with young people and adults.To maximise the social impact we generate,Epic will target our volunteer programmes more at young people not in education,employment,or training who face the greatest barriers to getting into work. Review delivery to ensure all programmes create strong social value Ambition 2 Although Epic’s overall employability programmes were responsible for 4 out of 5 young people moving onto positive destinations,not all our NEET programmes performed as well in 2015.To ensure our employability programmes deliver ambitious social value,Epic is now launching new NEET engagement projects for 2016 focussed on maximising numbers going into employment,education or training on completion. Widen the scope for reporting Ambition 3 Our first report has prioritised measuring the value generated from the targeted services Epic delivers.In future Social Impact Reports,Epic will continue measuring value generated by our targeted programmes,as well as looking at how best to evaluate the difference our universal programmes make to children and young people and communities. Launch new tools Ambition 4 As a Youth Service,we have historically reported on outputs in terms of learning hours delivered and commissioned targeted groups worked with.Epic is now building a clear organisational view of the difference we make when we work with young people through the introduction of distanced travelled surveys,Youth Outcome Stars,and Social Return on Investment calculations.Mainstreaming the use of these tools during 2016 will give Epic a greater understanding of which of our services generate the most ambitious social value. Track and survey a larger sample of young people who exit our programmes Ambition 5 Epic surveyed a third of young people on our employability programmes in 2015 to track their destination,and ask if our support had been responsible for the outcomes subsequently achieved in learning,employment or training.In future,we will aim to track a larger sample of young people.This will inform our assumptions about Epic’s attribution to the outcomes we achieve. Make more of our membership Ambition 6 Epic has a membership that extends to over 4,000 children and young people across Kensington and Chelsea,with strong citizenship and participation programmes embedded in all local schools.To better understand children and young people’s customer journey with Epic,and allow us to incentivise and reward participation and volunteering in our communities,Epic will be launching an organisational wide induction for children and young people.We will also explore how mobile technologies can provide access and updates to the full range of our services,as well as tracking young people’s journey with us throughout the year. Ambitions This report aims to better understand Epic’s social impact.Over time this will allow us to factor social value into our performance reporting and investment planning.Here are six key ambitions for how Epic will improve the way we measure and generate social impact in the future. WHERE TO NOW Epic CIC Impact Report 29 Google Epic invested in a new,more responsive IT system in 2015,installing Google Apps for Work and Google Chromebooks with the help of Google for Work Premier Partner,Ancoris.As a result, Epic has made cashable savings of more than £226,00 during the 2015,allowing room to use more of our budget on providing services for the youth of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. The Happy Manifesto Epic’s workforce has embraced the Happy Manifesto Principles and are helping to transform our workplace to one that motivates better performance and gives individual’s more freedom to innovate and manage their time. Energised by Happy’s training and mentoring expertise,we have seen some outstanding results in our 2015 Partners Survey.85% of staff told us their work gives them a sense of achievement, 87% of staff told us they understand how their work helps Epic achieve its goals and objectives, and 90% told us they believe Epic’s services deliver the best value and quality services for young people. 43 Primary, Secondary, Academy and Private Schools in Kensington and Chelsea Baxendale CAMHS CLC Building Futures Earls Court Youth Club Eurasmus+ London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham John Lyon’s Charity Kensington and Chelsea TMO Metropolitan Police MOPAC NHS West London CCG Pineapple Performing Dance Studio                                                      QPR in the Community Trust Roots HR Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Saatchi Gallery St Giles Trust Sylvia Young Theatre School The Cabinet Office   The Chelsea Foundation The Dalgarno Trust                       UK Youth Parliament/ BYC Westway Development Trust West London Citizens Youth Action Alliance Thank you to all our employees and young people members, funders, public sector delivery partners and community groups who have played their part in the impact Epic has made in 2015.
  16. 16. 30 Epic CIC Impact Report Epic CIC Impact Report 31 CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE If you are aged 9–25 years; live,study or play in Kensington and Chelsea,and want to try out a range of new activities/projects,meet new friends and develop new skills in one of Epic’s fun,safe and welcoming youth,sport and play provision visit Epic’s website on www.epiccic.org.uk or contact: Canalside Centre Canal Close,London,W10 5AY T: 020 8968 4500 Chelsea Centre Blantyre Street,London,SW10 0EQ T: 020 7349 9602 Chelsea Estates Centre Front Room,Wiltshire Close,London,SW3 2NS T: 020 7584 6535 Epic CIC Head Office First Floor,36C Oxford Gardens,London, W10 5UQ  T: 020 7938 8033 Flashpoint Centre Play World’s End Estate,Blantyre Street,Chelsea, London,SW10 0DS T: 020 7351 2186 Golborne Centre 2a Wornington Road,London,W10 5QW T: 020 8960 6238 Hortensia Office Chelsea School,Carlyle Building,Hortensia Road, London,SW10 0QS T: 020 7352 3931 Kayaking London Lots Road,London,SW10 0QH T: 020 7349 9591 Lancaster Centre 128 Lancaster Road,London,W11 1QS T: 020 73136 547 Little Wormwood Scrubs Adventure Playground Little Scrubs,Dalgarno Gardens,London,W10 5LL T: 020 8962 6940 Wiltshire Close Adventure Playground Wiltshire Close Estate,Rosemoor Street, London,SW3 T: 020 7584 6753 John Lyon’s Charity provides grants to organisations supporting children and young people in North West London.We have worked closely with Epic over a number of years,and are keen to continue this because of our shared focus on unlocking potential with the hardest to reach and most deprived. Erik Mesel, Grants and Public Policy Officer, John Lyon’s Charity PARTNERSHIPS If you are a local employer,funder or provider who wants to work with Epic please contact Brendan O’Keefe E: partnerships@epiccic.org.uk, T: 020 7938 8033 ADULTS If you are an adult or young person who wants to volunteer,gain skilled work experience and/ or opportunities for training and qualifications, whilst giving something valuable back to your community,contact our volunteering team E: jason.flavien@epiccic.org.uk OUTDOOR ACTIVITY VENUES If you are a school,college,business,voluntary/ community group or any interested party who wants to experience outdoor activities and/or gain outdoor sports accreditations and team building skills,contact Kayaking London on www.kayakinglondon.com or contact Canalside Centre. T: 020 8968 4500 GET INVOLVED Epic started delivering Community and Adventure Play in the borough from Flashpoint,Little Wormwood Scrubs and Wiltshire Close playgrounds for 6-14 year olds in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.Our playworkers offer a wide range of structured activities that promote personal and social development to help children and young people nurture and grow.Our play offer is co-produced and co-delivered in partnership with children and young people who determine how they want to play,as well as volunteering on community projects Epic runs.Working with an even wider age-group means Epic can expand our reach locally.We see benefits from the continuity of support 6-19 year olds can gain as they “graduate”from our playgrounds,to our youth centres,sports programmes and targeted services.We are investing in a play outcomes framework for the borough to demonstrate how we support children to make positive transitions and build resilience. In Jan 2016 Epic launched a new health and wellbeing programme for local people from the most deprived wards in Kensington and Chelsea based from Canalside Centre.Working in consortia with local community partners Exhale Training Solutions and This is Progress,our Green Gym and Healthy Shape Up programmes promotes healthy eating and nutrition,sports and outdoor pursuits like rock climbing and kayaking, personal development,horticulture,and community cohesion for all ages. Epic reorganised itself into locality multi-disciplinary teams drawing our Youth,Sport,Health and Ambition offers even closely together to improve the range and responsiveness of services to children and young people.To ensure our Youth Centres are places people want to be,we have already expanded the range of interests and opening times including introducing: • new weekend sports leagues • new programmes for preventing youth crime and sexual exploitation • new Health Room provision and construction skills courses • new education,employment or training projects for young Travellers Epic is enriching our offer to Schools, Early Help and Youth Offending professionals, by investing in Total Commitment Training for our staff.This means we will be able to deliver intensive Character Education interventions with young people over 2-3 weeks to achieve transformational goals. Building on our employability and targeted programmes,Total Commitment Training is a powerful tool for young people to focus their actions on better academic attainment and break out of patterns of conflict and under-achievement. Epic will launch the Kensington and Chelsea Young People’s Foundation with our voluntary sector partners John Lyon’s Charity and children and providers, voluntary sector groups,faith groups,housing associations and statutory services across the borough.Young People’s Foundations have already been developed elsewhere in London to combat the effects of widespread cuts in funding in the Children and Young People’s sector.Epic will work strategically to bring different groups together to develop partnership projects and share resources and good practice aligned to our social mission. In June 2016 In July 2016 from Autumn 2016 In 2017 GROWING OUR IMPACT Our impact in 2015 spurs us on to do more.To increase our impact further we are launching the following new innovative services:
  17. 17. EPIC CIC SITES 1 Lancaster Centre 2 Golborne Centre 3 Kayaking London 4 Canalside Centre 5 Chelsea Centre 6 Chelsea Estates Centre 7 Hortensia Office 8 Wiltshire Close Adventure Playground 9 Little Wormwood Scrubs Adventure Playground 10 Flashpoint Centre Play 11 Epic CIC Head Office 1 2 5 6 10 8 9 37 11 4 Epic Sites
  18. 18. E: info@epiccic.org.uk T: 020 7938 8033 www.epiccic.org.uk Produced by Baxendale offers expert advice and investment to help organisations achieve long-term sustainability and generate positive impact for the future.Since 2014 we have helped our public service mutual and social enterprise clients win more than £510m in new contracts and secure offers of over £9m in investment. www.baxendale.co.uk

×