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Lifespan Development: Adolescence Powerpoint

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Lifespan Development: Adolescence Powerpoint

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  4. 4. • Physical Development in Adolescence • Cognitive Development in Adolescence • Socioemotional Development in Adolescence • Cultural and Societal Influences on Adolescent Development Human Development > Adolescence Adolescence Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com www.boundless.com/psychology
  5. 5. Physical Development in Adolescence • Some of the most significant parts of pubertal development involve distinctive physiological changes in an individual's height, weight, body composition, and circulatory and respiratory systems.These changes are largely influenced by hormonal activity. • Puberty is the stage in life in which a child develops secondary sex characteristics (such as a deeper voice in boys; and development of breasts, and more curved and prominent hips in girls), as his or her hormonal balance shifts strongly towards an adult state. • Girls usually complete puberty by ages 15 to 17, and boys usually complete puberty by ages 16 to 17.Girls attain reproductive maturity about four years after the first physical changes of puberty appear. • The first places to grow are the extremities (head, hands, and feet), followed by the arms and legs, then the torso and shoulders.This non-uniform growth is one reason why an adolescent body may seem out of proportion. • Primary sex characteristics are those directly related to the sex organs, whereas secondary sex characteristics include every change that is not directly related to sexual reproduction. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/human-development-14/adolescence-73/physical-development-in-adolescence- 282-12817 Puberty View on Boundless.com Human Development > Adolescence
  6. 6. Cognitive Development in Adolescence • Jean Piaget describes adolescence as the stage of life in which the individual's thoughts start taking more of an abstract form, and egocentric thoughts decrease.This allows an individual to think and reason in a wider perspective. • The constructivist view, based on the work of Piaget, takes a quantitative, state-theory approach, hypothesizing that adolescents' cognitive improvement is relatively sudden and drastic. • The information-processing perspective derives from the study of artificial intelligence and attempts to explain cognitive development in terms of the growth of specific components of the thinking process. • The final stage of Piaget's developmental theory is the formal operational stage.It marks a movement from an ability to think and reason from concrete visible events, to an ability to think hypothetically, and to entertain 'what-if' possibilities about the world. • Metacognition is relevant in social cognition, resulting in increased introspection, self-consciousness, and intellectualization.Adolescents are more likely to question others' assertions, and less likely to accept facts as absolute truths. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/human-development-14/adolescence-73/cognitive-development-in-adolescence- 283-12818 Jean Piaget View on Boundless.com Human Development > Adolescence
  7. 7. Socioemotional Development in Adolescence • Adolescents must explore, test limits, become autonomous, and commit to an identity, or sense of self. • Early in adolescence, cognitive developments result in greater self-awareness; greater awareness of others, and their thoughts and judgments; the ability to think about abstract, future possibilities; and the ability to consider multiple possibilities at once. • Differentiation occurs as an adolescent recognizes the contextual influences on his or her own behavior and the perceptions of others, and begins to qualify personal traits. • Unlike the conflicting aspects of self-concept, identity represents a coherent sense of self stable across circumstances and inclusive of past experiences and future goals. • Self-esteem is one's thoughts and feelings about one's self-concept and identity. • When an adolescent has advanced cognitive development and maturity, he or she tends to resolve identity issues more so than peers who are less cognitively developed. Identity View on Boundless.com Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/human-development-14/adolescence-73/socioemotional-development- in-adolescence-284-12819 Human Development > Adolescence
  8. 8. Cultural and Societal Influences on Adolescent Development • When children go through puberty, there is often a significant increase in parent-child conflict, and a less cohesive familial bond. • As children begin to gain bonds with various people, they start to form friendships, which can be beneficial to development.Strong peer groups are especially important during adolescence when parental supervision decreases and interaction with peers increases. • Culture is learned and socially shared and affects all aspects of an individual's life.Social responsibilities, sexual expression, and belief system development are all things that are likely to vary by culture. • Peer groups offer members the opportunity to develop social skills but can also have negative influences via peer pressure. • Often, crowd identities may be the basis for stereotyping young people, such as jocks or nerds.In large, multi-ethnic high schools, there are often ethnically-determined crowds as well. • Culture is learned and socially shared, and it affects all aspects of an individual's life.Social responsibilities, sexual expression, and belief system development, for instance, are all likely to vary based on culture. The parent-child relationship View on Boundless.com Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/human-development-14/adolescence-73/cultural-and-societal-influences- on-adolescent-development-285-12820 Human Development > Adolescence
  9. 9. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Appendix
  10. 10. Key terms • adolescence The transitional period of physical and psychological development between childhood and maturity. • differentiation The act of distinguishing or describing a thing, by giving its different, or specific difference; exact definition or determination. • egocentrism The constant following of one's egotistical desires to an extreme, usually involving a severe lack of extroverted tendencies. • gonad A sex organ that produces gametes; specifically, a testicle or ovary. • introspection A looking inward; the act or process of self-examination, or inspection of one's own thoughts and feelings; the cognition which the mind has of its own acts and states; self-consciousness. • mnemonic device Any specific learning technique that aids information retention. • peer pressure encouragement by others in one's age group to act or behave in a certain way. • precocious Characterized by exceptionally early development or maturity. • prefrontal cortex The anterior part of the frontal lobes of the brain, lying in front of the motor and premotor areas; a part of the brain associated with higher cognition • puberty The age at which a person is first capable of sexual reproduction • puberty The age at which a person is first capable of sexual reproduction • self-esteem confidence in one's own worth; self-respect Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development
  11. 11. Identity Adolescence is the period of life between the onset of puberty and the full commitment to an adult social role.It is the period known for the formation of personal and social identity. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Wordpress. "Personal Identity | Bodhi Leaf." License: Other http://bodhileaf.wordpress.com/2010/01/12/personal-identity/ View on Boundless.com Human Development
  12. 12. Jean Piaget Jean Piaget describes adolescence as the stage of life in which the individual's thoughts start taking more of an abstract form, and egocentric thoughts decrease. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Wikipedia. "Jean Piaget." GNU FDL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Piaget View on Boundless.com Human Development
  13. 13. Community Culture is learned and socially shared, and it affects all aspects of an individual's life.Social responsibilities, sexual expression, and belief system development, for instance, are all things that are likely to vary by culture. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Wikipedia. "Community." GNU FDL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community View on Boundless.com Human Development
  14. 14. Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development includes four stages: sensorimotor, pre-operational, concrete operational, and formal operational. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Wikispaces. "mcmETEC5303 - My Stance on Educational Technology, by Jean Piaget." CC BY http://mcmetec5303.wikispaces.com/My+Stance+on+Educational+Technology,+by+Jean+Piaget View on Boundless.com Human Development
  15. 15. The parent-child relationship When children go through puberty, there is often a significant increase in parent-child conflict, and a less cohesive familial bond. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Wikipedia. "Parents." GNU FDL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parents View on Boundless.com Human Development
  16. 16. Puberty Girls usually complete puberty by ages 15 to 17, and boys usually complete puberty by ages 16 to 17.Girls attain reproductive maturity about four years after the first physical changes of puberty appear. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Wikipedia. "Adolescence." GNU FDL http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolescence View on Boundless.com Human Development
  17. 17. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development What change(s) occur during puberty? A) There is increased hair growth in certain parts of the body B) Puberty is a time of increased strength and endurance C) All of these answers D) Hormones signal the body to grow faster
  18. 18. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Saylor OER. "Psychology « Saylor.org – Free Online Courses Built by Professors." CC BY 3.0 http://www.saylor.org/majors/Psychology/ Human Development What change(s) occur during puberty? A) There is increased hair growth in certain parts of the body B) Puberty is a time of increased strength and endurance C) All of these answers D) Hormones signal the body to grow faster
  19. 19. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development Which of the following is a reason adolescents feel that they are invincible? A) Personal fable B) Abstraction C) Scientific thinking D) Imaginary audience
  20. 20. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Boundless - LO. "Boundless." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://www.boundless.com/ Human Development Which of the following is a reason adolescents feel that they are invincible? A) Personal fable B) Abstraction C) Scientific thinking D) Imaginary audience
  21. 21. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development The behavior of an adolescent will most likely be guided by: A) Peer influence B) Parental conflict C) Religious beliefs D) Cognitive skills
  22. 22. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Boundless - LO. "Boundless." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://www.boundless.com/ Human Development The behavior of an adolescent will most likely be guided by: A) Peer influence B) Parental conflict C) Religious beliefs D) Cognitive skills
  23. 23. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development Young adolescents are most likely to identify what as their main identity source? A) Social aspects B) Gender C) Race D) Sports played
  24. 24. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Boundless - LO. "Boundless." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://www.boundless.com/ Human Development Young adolescents are most likely to identify what as their main identity source? A) Social aspects B) Gender C) Race D) Sports played
  25. 25. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development What characterizes the parent-teen relationship during adolescence? A) The frequency and intensity of parent-teen conflict is high. B) Parent relationships are generally undermined by peer relationships. C) Although peer influence grows, parents continue to be the most influential in the life of teens. D) Teens report having religious, political, and general beliefs very different from their parents.
  26. 26. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Saylor OER. "Psychology « Saylor.org – Free Online Courses Built by Professors." CC BY 3.0 http://www.saylor.org/majors/Psychology/ Human Development What characterizes the parent-teen relationship during adolescence? A) The frequency and intensity of parent-teen conflict is high. B) Parent relationships are generally undermined by peer relationships. C) Although peer influence grows, parents continue to be the most influential in the life of teens. D) Teens report having religious, political, and general beliefs very different from their parents.
  27. 27. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development How do peer friendships in adolescence differ from those in childhood? A) Friendships tend to be more complex and teenagers tend to have multiple layers of friend groups. B) Friendships tend to be more dynamic and subject to change. C) Friendships tend to be more complex and teenagers tend to have multiple layers of friend groups, AND friendships tend to be more dynamic and subject to change. D) Teenagers tend to have friends dissimilar to themselves in terms of gender, age and interests.
  28. 28. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Saylor OER. "Psychology « Saylor.org – Free Online Courses Built by Professors." CC BY 3.0 http://www.saylor.org/majors/Psychology/ Human Development How do peer friendships in adolescence differ from those in childhood? A) Friendships tend to be more complex and teenagers tend to have multiple layers of friend groups. B) Friendships tend to be more dynamic and subject to change. C) Friendships tend to be more complex and teenagers tend to have multiple layers of friend groups, AND friendships tend to be more dynamic and subject to change. D) Teenagers tend to have friends dissimilar to themselves in terms of gender, age and interests.
  29. 29. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development An adolescent is most likely to experience high self-esteem when: A) They have a good relationship with their parents. B) All of these answers. C) They have not been rejected by their peers. D) They have at least one close friendship.
  30. 30. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Boundless - LO. "Boundless." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://www.boundless.com/ Human Development An adolescent is most likely to experience high self-esteem when: A) They have a good relationship with their parents. B) All of these answers. C) They have not been rejected by their peers. D) They have at least one close friendship.
  31. 31. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development Which of the following describes a behavior from Piaget's formal operational stage of development? A) Hypothetical thinking B) Abstract reasoning C) Both hypothetical thinking and abstract reasoning D) Neither hypothetical thinking nor abstract reasoning
  32. 32. Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Boundless - LO. "Boundless." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://www.boundless.com/ Human Development Which of the following describes a behavior from Piaget's formal operational stage of development? A) Hypothetical thinking B) Abstract reasoning C) Both hypothetical thinking and abstract reasoning D) Neither hypothetical thinking nor abstract reasoning
  33. 33. Human Development Attribution • Wikipedia. "Developmental psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_psychology#Adolescence • Wikipedia. "Adolescent psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolescent_psychology#Biological_development • Wiktionary. "gonad." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/gonad • Wiktionary. "puberty." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/puberty • Wiktionary. "precocious." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/precocious • Wikipedia. "Adolescent psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolescent_psychology#Biological_development • Wikipedia. "Piaget's theory of cognitive development." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piaget%2527s_theory_of_cognitive_development#Formal_operational_stage • Wikipedia. "Cognitive development." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_development#Formal_operational_stage • Wikipedia. "Adolescent psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolescent_psychology#Cognitive_development • Wiktionary. "egocentrism." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/egocentrism • Wiktionary. "introspection." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/introspection • Wikipedia. "mnemonic device." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/mnemonic+device • Wiktionary. "prefrontal cortex." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/prefrontal+cortex • Wikipedia. "Developmental psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_psychology#Adolescence • Wikipedia. "Identity formation." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_formation • Wikipedia. "Adolescent psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolescent_psychology#Identity_development • Boundless Learning. "Boundless." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://www.boundless.com//management/Free to share, print, make copies and chadngeefsi.n Giteito ynou/rds iafft ewrwewn.btoiuantdiolesns.com
  34. 34. • Wiktionary. "self-esteem." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/self-esteem • Wikipedia. "Identity formation." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_formation • Wikipedia. "Adolescent psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolescent_psychology • Wikipedia. "Adolescent psychology." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolescent_psychology • Wikipedia. "peer pressure." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/peer+pressure • Wiktionary. "adolescence." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/adolescence • Wiktionary. "puberty." CC BY-SA 3.0 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/puberty Free to share, print, make copies and changes. Get yours at www.boundless.com Human Development

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