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Indiana academy slc_pdf

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This presentation was provided to the student life staff at the Indiana Academy on July 26.

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Indiana academy slc_pdf

  1. 1. CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH ABILITY STUDENTS INDIANA ACADEMY
  2. 2. WHO IS GIFTED? WHO IS A BALL STATE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT?
  3. 3. WHO IS GIFTED? WHO IS A BALL STATE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT? Female, White, Member of the College of Sciences and Humanities with an SAT score (3-part combined) of 1630, attending Ball State full time…
  4. 4. WHO IS GIFTED? WHO IS A BALL STATE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT? Female (57%), White (83%), Member of the College of Sciences and Humanities (n=5620), SAT (3-part combined) = 1630, Full Time (99%)… Does this describe all students? Is it important?
  5. 5. Characteristic Manifest Support
  6. 6. FROM NAGC’S WEBSITE HTTP://WWW.NAGC.ORG/RESOURCES-PUBLICATIONS/RESOURCES/MY-CHILD-GIFTED/COMMON-CHARACTERISTICS-GIFTED-INDIVIDUALS/TRAITS
  7. 7. ADORA SVITAK
  8. 8. VIEWER COMMENTS “Oh, if I only had a child who was half intelligent, yet not so full of herself, I would rejoice.” “She is obnoxious, full of herself, and disrespectful to adults...” Adora Svitak
  9. 9. NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE CHARACTERISTICS
  10. 10. MAIN CHARACTERISTICS ASYNCHRONOUS V. MULTIPOTENTIALITY
  11. 11. CHARACTERISTICS PERFECTIONISM
  12. 12. WHICH ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT FOR YOU? REVISIT THE LIST. VOTE.
  13. 13. WHAT DO THESE LOOK LIKE IN THE RESIDENCE HALLS? MANIFEST
  14. 14. HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT? SUPPORT
  15. 15. SUPPORT HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT THESE STUDENTS? ▸ Recognize and validate their feelings and experiences. ▸ Help them to challenge any cognitive distortions. ▸ Provide techniques and information on stress.
  16. 16. VALIDATE.
  17. 17. If we all understood that everyone has their own battles to fight and insecurities to face, the world would be a gentler place.
  18. 18. “It is okay to feel ______. You can handle that feeling. Just let it be.
  19. 19. CHALLENGE.
  20. 20. Self-Talk Coaches
  21. 21. “Cognitive distortions are specific examples of negative self-talk. Cognitive distortions are inaccurate thoughts used to reinforce negative thinking or emotions.
  22. 22. #1: ALL OR NONE THINKING
  23. 23. HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES ➤ Recognize the distortion. ➤ Compartmentalize 1. What is the middle ground? ➤ Compartmentalize 2. What are things to be good at? What are things that it is okay not to be perfect in? ➤ Create a plan.
  24. 24. #2: MIND READER
  25. 25. Reality v. perception?
  26. 26. HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES ➤ Recognize the distortion. ➤ Reflect/journal on the following: ➤ Who says you have to be perfect? ➤ What will your parents think if you are not perfect? ➤ What will your teachers think if you are not perfect? ➤ Ask the person. Discuss. ➤ Feedback filter (selective listening/actively ignoring): ➤ What is helpful? What can I use to get better? ➤ Everything else: Let go. Why might “Just do your best.” be a dangerous phrase for a perfectionist?
  27. 27. #3: SHOULDS/ SHOULDN’TS
  28. 28. I should be a doctor…
  29. 29. Do you have any examples of students’ “shoulds” thinking?
  30. 30. “If one fails to meet the unrealistic expectation, one has failed; but if one does meet it, one feels no glow of achievement for one has only done what was expected. (Weisinger & Lobsenz, 1981, p.281)
  31. 31. HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES ➤ Recognize the distortion. ➤ Consider: How much can you do? Think back to all-or-none thinking. Some is better than nothing. ➤ Goal: Promote realistic thinking. ➤ Create a realistic plan. (Perhaps, still a little aspirational, but not so much so that they feel like a failure.) ➤ Celebrate effort.
  32. 32. STRESS.
  33. 33. 30,000 Americans A LOT OF STRESS 43% increased chance of dying BUT….
  34. 34. 30,000 Americans A LOT OF STRESS 43% increased chance of dying Belief that stress is harmful. &
  35. 35. “People who experienced a lot of stress but did not view stress as harmful were no more likely to die. In fact, they had the lowest risk of dying of anyone in the study, including those who had relatively little stress. -Kelly McGonigal (TED talk)
  36. 36. YOUR PERCEPTION OF STRESS MATTERS. WE CAN MODEL THIS. WE CAN TEACH THIS. &
  37. 37. YERKES DODSON DIAGRAM
  38. 38. The goal is not to eliminate stress, but rather to create ways to leverage it to work for us.
  39. 39. SHIFTING LANGUAGE Research from Alison Wood Brooks from Harvard Business School I am anxious! ANXIETY EXCITEMENT DEPRESSION CALM Positivity Arousal I am excited!
  40. 40. SHIFTING LANGUAGE Research from Alison Wood Brooks from Harvard Business School I am anxious! ANXIETY EXCITEMENT DEPRESSION CALM Positivity Arousal I am excited! Predict how this switch affected people singing, doing math, or giving a speech.
  41. 41. Research from Alison Wood Brooks from Harvard Business School I am anxious! ANXIETY EXCITEMENT DEPRESSION CALM Positivity Arousal I am excited! 17% 22% 17% Threat Opportunity SHIFTING LANGUAGE
  42. 42. WHY WOULD I SHARE THIS RESEARCH?
  43. 43. Show them a 13 minute TED talk…
  44. 44. TEACHING STUDENTS… ➤ How stressed are you? ➤ Remember, this stress can be helpful. ➤ How will you use this stress to rise to the challenge? When? Study guides for tests. Journals. Morning meetings and work. The more you model, the more automatic it will become. When would work for you?
  45. 45. STRESS V. ANXIETY? ➤ Stress is the body’s reaction to a circumstance or situation that requires physical, mental, or emotional adjustment or response. It could be caused by negative or positive changes. ➤ Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in America, affecting 18% of US population, and almost 30% of Americans across the lifespan. ➤ Anxiety is a feeling of fear, unease, worry when situations are perceived as uncontrollable, unavoidable. Most common symptoms of anxiety are insistent worrying, phobias, social anxiety, and OCD. Others include: chest pain, dizziness, shortness of breath, and panic attacks.
  46. 46. CALMING TECHNIQUES
  47. 47. BASIC STRATEGIES ➤ Movement: Exercise, yoga. ➤ Breathing. ➤ Purposeful prayer/meditation. ➤ Quiet time (without screens). ➤ Art/creation time.
  48. 48. BIG PICTURE CHARACTERISTICS MATTER. SUPPORT MATTERS.

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