Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 99 Anzeige

Association leadership

Herunterladen, um offline zu lesen

Professional associations are in transition and so to must be association leadership. What's it take to be a trustee leader in this environment? Here are a few thoughts recently shared with the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists region II leadership.

Professional associations are in transition and so to must be association leadership. What's it take to be a trustee leader in this environment? Here are a few thoughts recently shared with the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists region II leadership.

Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Ähnlich wie Association leadership (20)

Anzeige

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

Association leadership

  1. 1. Association Leadership and Governance © Signature Resources 2015 1 Faculty Les Wallace, Ph.D. AANA Region 2 Director: Debbie Barber, CRNA, DNP, MS March 21, 2015
  2. 2. Final Exam My goal today… You will act on something to advance governance leadership! © Signature Resources Inc. 2015 2
  3. 3. Leading in the 21st Century “When best selling authors bore you, you think it’s your fault.” Jim Collins © Signature Resources 2015 3
  4. 4. My Best Seller… Right Behind Good to Great  30 dimensions of Contemporary leadership  New research on leadership development and succession  Ten 21st Century Legacy needs  Gobs of other great stuff © Signature Resources 2015 4 Speak to 20,000 / year on Leadership
  5. 5. Another Best Seller… Right Behind Good to Great © Signature Resources 2015 Bringing governance out from the Shadows of the 1950s. 5
  6. 6. Who is this guy?  Ideal 21C job: Grandparent!  University professor / administrator  Hospital administrator—traditional Board  International consulting company… Touch 20,000 people yr. / Coach 28 Execs / 17 Boards a year  50% for-profit / 50% government & not-for-profit clients  Served on a Bank Board of Directors  Serving on Counterpart International Board  Serving on World Future Society Board © Signature Resources 2015 6
  7. 7. 300+ Boards 1,000+ Board Meetings Over 100 Board Assessments © Signature Resources 2015 The BAD, the frustrated, the disengaged. 7
  8. 8. And then there’s committee work… © Signature Resources 2015 A dark alley down which good ideas are led to be strangled! 8
  9. 9. What is The Future of Association Governance? “The future is already here—it’s just not evenly distributed yet.” © Signature Resources 2015 9 Let’s see if we can do something about that!
  10. 10. What is The Future of Association Leadership? “The ever Present Future” Benchmark, Read the Governance literature, call in the experts. © Signature Resources 2015 10
  11. 11. © Signature Resources 2015 11 Synthesis of Elements of Governance
  12. 12. The Professional Association Curse: “Old Wiring in a New Era” © Signature Resources 2015 Tradition—old models remain unexamined. Time—dangerously slow to upgrade. Timidity—we might hurt someone’s feelings. Inexperienced leaders at the state level. 12
  13. 13. Courage to Re-Wire the Model © Signature Resources 2015 13 Race for Relevance: 5 Radical Changes for Associations H. Coerver & Mary Byers, CAE, 2011 The End of Membership As We Know It, Sarah Sladek, 2011 Maximum Engagement C. David Gammel, 2011 Governance as Leadership: Reframing the Work of Nonprofit Boards, Richard Chait,2005
  14. 14. Leadership Governance Leadership  Leadership is helping others find their own leadership in a journey to personal and professional accomplishment: as individuals, teams, & organizations.  Governance leadership is a responsibility to serve as a “trustee” of the profession by sustaining a viable and relevant association who serves member interests. Let’s take a separate look at each forms of leadership. © Signature Resources 2015 14
  15. 15. 21st Century Leadership All humans struggle with two common issues… 1. We want to be successful—with our work, our families and our lives. 2. We are unable to predict the future. That’s why leadership matters so much! © Signature Resources 2015 15
  16. 16. People Everywhere Want to be respected. Want to feel valuable. Want to be successful. They Are uncertain about their future. Get complacent when times are going well. Wonder what their leaders are thinking. © Signature Resources 2015 16
  17. 17. Traditional Views of Leadership  Position of power over budgets and people.  In charge of others.  Directing decisions about the future.  Leading the creation of new products, services, processes, partnerships.  Recognized by others as the “face” of the department or organization.  Elected, so, therefore, must be a leader. © Signature Resources 2015 17
  18. 18. Leading in the 21st Century “Leaders don’t create followers… …they create other leaders!” © Signature Resources 2015 18
  19. 19. Contemporary Views of Leadership  Leaders are servants to families, communities, work teams and organizations.  Leaders develop other leaders.  Leaders are transformational voices— helping us all keep up with change.  Leaders help craft and achieve “common energizing visions.” © Signature Resources 2015 19 “A good leader inspires people to have confidence in the leader, a great leader inspires people to have confidence in themselves."
  20. 20. Leadership out the the 20th Century and into the 21st Century From “Heroic” to “Transformational” “Whereas the heroic manager of the past knew all, could do all, and could solve every problem, the post-heroic manager asks how every problem can be solved in a way that develops other people’s capacity to handle it. Charles Handy, The Age of Reason © Signature Resources 2015 20
  21. 21. Servants or Commanders “No one likes to be bossed!” “The servant-leader is servant first… It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve. Then conscious choice brings one to aspire to lead.” “That person is sharply different from one who is leader first because of their need to fulfill an unusual power drive…The leader- first and the servant-first are two extreme types.” © Signature Resources 2015 21
  22. 22. Servants or Commanders “The difference manifests itself in the care taken by the servant-first to make sure that other people’s highest priority needs are being served. The best test, and difficult to administer, is: Do those served grow as persons?” © Signature Resources 2015 22
  23. 23. Points to Ponder Leaders of the future are known less by what they control and more by what they shape. “The leader of the past was a person who knew how to tell. The leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask.” Peter Drucker, 1993 © Signature Resources 2015 23
  24. 24. Servant Leadership  How many people are in the sales business?  Influence and facilitation of “our” decisions rather than command.  Facilitators use phrases such as: “What about?” “Does this fit?” “Could this be another option?” “Here are some ideas I’ve been thinking about.” © Signature Resources 2015 24
  25. 25. 21st Century Leadership Points to Ponder Distributed leadership vs top down “The most pernicious myth of all is that leadership is reserved for only a few of us.” “When we liberate the leader in everyone, Extraordinary things happen!” © Signature Resources 2015 25
  26. 26. Questions for You? © Signature Resources 2015 26  When’s the last time you believe you behaved as a “servant leader?”  Coached? Mentored? Is there a difference?  Facilitate?  Develop someone else’s leadership capacity / perspective?  Supported someone else behaving as a leader?
  27. 27. Building Leadership in your Sphere of Influence Leadership is really this simple:  Help others be as successful as they can be.  Help others gain knowledge and develop new skills.  Help others anticipate the future of their work and organization to reduce surprise.  Help others adapt to the transformation of their work and organization--anticipate and cope.  Help your entire organization / profession continue to innovate and transform to stay relevant and vibrant.  And in all things, remain honest and true to your values. © Signature Resources 2015 27
  28. 28. Sets of Leadership Competencies  Vision: external awareness, strategic thinking, energizing vision.  Transformation/Adaptation: leading transitions, process redesign, facilitating innovation, developing alliances.  Developing leaders @ every level.  Communication: transparency, coaching/mentoring, influence/negotiating, interpersonal competence.  Customer /patient focus: quality, value, service, inclusion.  Self: integrity, continuous learning, personal/professional balance. A Legacy of 21st Century Leadership, Wallace, Trinka The Extraordinary Leader, Zenger, Folkman © Signature Resources 2015 28
  29. 29. 21st Century Leadership Competencies © Signature Resources 2015 CEO Leadership Competency Governance Competency Visioning External awareness Critical, strategic thinking Creating an energizing future vision Analyzing the changing environment Critical, strategic thinking Creating an energizing future vision Adaptation/Transformation Leading transitions Leading work process/systems re-design Sponsoring continuous learning Facilitating creativity/innovation Developing partnerships/alliances Initiating organizational change Leading large organization transformation Continuous governance development Breakthrough thinking Developing partnerships/alliances Developing Leaders @ Every Level Distributing accountability for outcomes Creating involvement in decision making Developing/leading multifunctional teams Leadership development Leveraging diversity Committee functions distribute leadership Assuring inclusive member input Engaging member leaders Finding / growing the next generation Leveraging diversity Source: A Legacy of 21st Century Leadership 29
  30. 30. 21st Century Leadership Competencies © Signature Resources 2015 CEO Leadership Competency Governance Competency Communication Openness/transparency of information Coaching / mentoring Influence/negotiating Interpersonal competence (emotional intelligence) Openness/transparency of information Direct/professional/timely feedback Influencing / negotiating Interpersonal competence Customer/Member Focus Member value and satisfaction focus Products/services designed with member input Quality improvement/Risk management Constituent value & satisfaction focus Constituent input Enterprise risk management Self Values/ethics Continuous learning Personal / professional balance Integrity / credibility Continuous learning Personal / Professional balance Source: A Legacy of 21st Century Leadership 30
  31. 31.  Marcus Buckingham, et. al., Now Discover Your Strengths (2001).  Robert Goffee and Gareth Jones, Why Should Anyone Be Led by You? (2009).  Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ (1995).  Michael Marquardt, Leading with Questions: How Leaders Find the Right Solutions by Knowing What to Ask (2014).  Simon Sinek, Start with Why (2011)  Michael Unseem, The Leadership Moment (1998).  Les Wallace and Jim Trinka, A Legacy of 21st Century Leadership (2007)  Les Wallace, Dennis Derr, Eric Meade, Personal Success in a Team Environment (2014) © Signature Resources 2015 31
  32. 32. Questions on Personal Leadership? © Signature Resources 2015 32
  33. 33. On Governance: My Job Today © Signature Resources 2015  A look @ high performance governance practices as assembled from BoardSource, National Association of Corporate Directors, American Hospital Association, The Conference Board and others.  Candid opinions based on work with 300+ boards: For-profit, non-profit, international, financial, healthcare, community, national associations.  Likely to challenge assumptions, stretch thinking.  Open dialogue—your question is not an interruption!  “Where governance is going!” 33
  34. 34. Leadership within Professional Associations © Signature Resources 2015 How can the average CRNA contribute to leadership within their state? 34
  35. 35. Leadership within Professional Associations  Involvement in conferences and other TxANA events.  Volunteering to help in some capacity.  Attending to the changing political and work environment.  Contributing to the PAC; attending Capitol Day.  Learning about association leadership.  Participating in feedback to the Board of Directors.  Service on task forces or committees.  Supporting your elected officers.  Running for office yourself.  Serving as an elected “trustee” of your state board. © Signature Resources 2015 35
  36. 36. Ugly Realities of Professional Membership Associations 2015  Younger members disengaging at an alarming rate.  Transparency pressures are requiring greater board and administrative time and demand a new generation of leadership.  Shallow governance literacy is rampant—a board is not a committee on steroids. Trustees need to be “governance” competent.  Virtual communities can supplant Association value.  Virtual networks can accelerate Association strategies or become viral cancers requiring enormous time and money to treat.  Traditional “bundled” member services transforming to “unbundled buffet” driven by member desire to target professional investments. © Signature Resources 2015 36
  37. 37. Dilemmas in Association Leadership Characteristic Challenge It’s Personal Emotion runs high on even the smallest of issues. Emotion vs business savvy can drive decisions. It’s Voluntary The best frequently don’t step up. It’s Popularity Driven Popularity does not = competency. It’s Changing Drastically Old models challenged by younger members. Economic stress continues to crunch associations. It’s Frequently Boring Traditional business meetings, educational presentations, and conferences based on a tired model. © Signature Resources 2015 37
  38. 38. The Professional Association Promise © Signature Resources 2015 “To be personally valuable to you and our profession.” 38
  39. 39. © Signature Resources 2015 The Association 4 Value Promise™ 4 My Region 4 My Profession 4 My Job 4 My Career 39
  40. 40. Professional Life-Cycle Focuses Member Need / Value Advanced CRNA: Advanced Clinical Competency Leadership Business of Anesthesia Advocacy Established CRNA: Clinical Competency Career Development Advocacy Leadership New CRNA: Clinical Competency Personal Advocacy OR Teamwork Navigating their Organization © Signature Resources 2015 The unengaged member looking for value—from students on. 40
  41. 41. Constituent Engagement Ten Year Leadership Development Life - Cycle Early volunteer engagement offerings are mostly basic to prepare tactical competencies and literacy for state/regional levels of governance leadership. Increased volunteer engagement offerings range from self-directed learning modules to workshops to required “boot camps” for officers and committee chairs. Inclusive to any member who believes they will benefit! National level leadership engagement offerings focus on high performance governance leadership and national regional and state liaison leadership roles. © Signature Resources 2015 The unengaged member looking for support and insight. 41
  42. 42. National Board of Directors Lead National Advocacy for Practice Scope / Reimbursement ID & Deliver on 4 Member Values Assure Leadership Pipeline National Board Support/Develop State Association / Local Chapter / SIG Excellence Rally State Advocacy Develop Engagement in Association Leadership State Associations Assure Professional Competence [Clinical & Work Place Competencies] Personal Advocacy Support Protect Practice Scope and Reimbursement © Signature Resources 2015 42
  43. 43. Economic Value of Constituent Leadership Engagement © Signature Resources 2015 Engagement Level Economic Value Volunteer @ hourly support (registration desk, conference support, other coordination) $50-$75/hr. State Committee / Task Force Service $75-$100/hr. State Board $300/hr. National committee/task force $500/hr. National Board $500/hr. 43
  44. 44. Economic Value of Leadership Engagement © Signature Resources 2015 Engagement Level Economic Value An all day State Board meeting of 9 members $21,600 of intellectual value Plus Travel Plus staff support A 5 person national committee meeting of 1.5 hours + 3 hrs. prep $11,250 of intellectual value Plus Travel Plus staff support A one day National Board meeting of 11 members + 4 hours prep $66,000 of intellectual value Plus staff support Plus travel for all 44
  45. 45. What is The Business of Governance?  Fiduciary:  Financial soundness, sound association processes, ethical and legal responsibility.  Strategic:  Member engagement, professional and leadership development, advocacy, future vision for AANA. © Signature Resources 2015 45
  46. 46. 21st Century Governance The role of governance is to create, authorize and monitor the strategic direction of the enterprise and create values, policy and financial plans that support vibrant delivery of their mission. Fiduciary, policy and strategy governance. Boards that Make a Difference, John Carver © Signature Resources 2015 46
  47. 47. General Board and Committee Accountabilities  Your mission is to provide value and positive impact for a constituent community.  Your vision is a future horizon of organization impact relevant to shifting dynamics.  Your values are the principles to which you commit your organizational practices.  Your legal responsibilities include fiduciary accountability to advance the mission and oversee assets in a responsible matter.  Board role: policy and strategy; ensure operational systems support members; monitor details of organizational performance and make course corrections; set transformational strategy.  Your Committee roles: consider current and future issues; organize, evaluate and deliver options and products for Board consideration.  Our measures: business success, constituent value, AANA vibrancy & relevance. © Signature Resources 2015 47
  48. 48. Legal Obligations of Individual Board Members Duty of Care  Use your best judgment.  Stay informed, engaged and attentive to governance work.  Ask pertinent and challenging questions, raise ethical questions. Duty of Loyalty  Disclose conflicts of interest.  Put aside narrow personal / professional interests. Duty of Obedience  Support the organizational mission.  Obey the law and organizational by-laws, policies, values, and ethical standards. © Signature Resources 2015 48
  49. 49. Governance vs Managerial roles FUNCTIONS GOVERNING RESPONSIBILITY MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITY Strategic Planning • Set mission & Vision. • Determine organizational values. • Identify Service philosophy. • Set strategic objectives (3-5 yrs). • Ensure operational objectives are aligned with and support strategic objectives. • Approve major org. realignment • Approve new services / expansion, cutbacks, partnering. • ID long range operational & strategic issues for board. • Translate strategy into operation. • Implement change & monitor progress. • Provide timely market data. • Execute. Finance /Budget • Establish annual budget. • Approve working capital and capital investment. • Approve variations from budget. • Ensure accounting system to track and monitor use of funds. • Ensure regular financial and operational audits by external sources. • Support fundraising. • Conduct feasibility studies. • Investment analysis. • Financial forecasts. • Develop annual budget. • Prepare Pro-forma budget statements. • Justify budget exceptions. • Manage cash flow. • Fundraising/Capital development.© Signature Resources 2015 49
  50. 50. Governance vs Managerial roles FUNCTIONS GOVERNING RESPONSIBILITY MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITY Operational Excellence • Ensure robust constituent feedback and evaluation of products / services. • Ensure adequate quality processes: planning, evaluation, improvement. • Approve significant corrective actions & changes in service profiles. • Determine preferred organizational culture. • Regular review and update of policies. • Collect constituent input. • Routinely monitor quality indicators. • Special studies and corrective action as needed. • Review/update procedures. • Translate all Board guidance into procedures and operations. Public Policy • Develop strategic alliances and partnerships. • Maintain appropriate government, professional and organizational relations. • Support professional activities. • Establish & maintain governmental., professional & organizational relations. • Serve as communication link. © Signature Resources 2015 50
  51. 51. Governance vs Managerial roles FUNCTIONS GOVERNING RESPONSIBILITY MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITY Human Resources • Evaluate performance/set CEO objectives. • Approve org. salary & benefits plans. • Ensure legal & competitive human resources policies. • Ensure a leadership succession plan. • Hire Executive Team • Recommend salary ranges. • Develop/manage HR system & records. • Performance management system. • Recruitment & retention. Board Development • New member orientation. • Commit to in-service & conference attendance. • Succession planning for board positions. • Evaluate Board performance. • Assess committee functions. • Assist new member orientation. • Encourage / arrange training. • Support in governance leadership development for potential and new board members. • Assist board evaluation process. © Signature Resources 2015 51
  52. 52. Building Leadership in the Association Sphere of Influence Leadership is really this simple:  Help CRNAs be as successful as they can be.  Help CRNAs gain knowledge and develop new skills.  Help CRNAs anticipate the future of their work and organization to reduce surprise.  Help CRNAs adapt to the transformation of their work and organization-anticipate and cope.  Help your entire organization / profession continue to innovate and transform to stay relevant and vibrant.  And in all things, remain honest and true to your values. © Signature Resources 2015 52
  53. 53. Strategic Objectives for Associations 1. Actively influence national and state governmental reimbursement decisions in support of CRNA reimbursement equity. 2. Drive quality and scope of practice excellence for CRNAs. 3. Enhance state association operational and governance excellence, and CRNA leadership development. 4. Maintain member engagement: meetings, communication, task groups, focus groups, committees, Board service. 5. Organizational excellence: identifying what it means to be a High Performance Professional Association. © Signature Resources 2015 53
  54. 54. Ahh, Committees and Task Forces “If Columbus had an advisory committee he would still be at the dock.” © Signature Resources 2015 54
  55. 55. When to Use A committee or task force  Standing Committees should be convened to provide the Board depth of analysis and future facing ideas for the areas of greatest organizational risk (e.g. finance, continuing education, conferences, nominations, government relations, programs/services, etc.)  A task force is a temporary action group charged with a specific question, issue, opportunity that may require heavy lifting, innovative thinking, or inclusion of other members. © Signature Resources 2015 55
  56. 56. When to Use A committee or task force Questions to ask before creating a task force: Are the organizational staff or consultant capable of answering the questions and identifying options? If Yes! Go here first. It’s cheaper, faster, and values your staff. If No? Should a subject matter expert / consultant be contracted to give direction to the board instead of a task force? Do you need specialized input from subject matter experts in your constituency or diverse perspective on scoping a difficult and controversial issue? A task force can serve this purpose for a board thereby keeping the Board’s positions open until they’ve received broader perspective. © Signature Resources 2015 56
  57. 57. High Performance Committee Work  Clarity: committee outcomes are VIVIDLY spelled out.  Clarity: charter clearly aligns work with Board strategic and operational objectives.  Clarity: process expectations, boundaries and timing.  Membership: convened for capability not political currency or payback. Fresh eyes always helpful.  Deliberation sessions focused and effective.  Transparency: full and complete to all interested!  Courageous: willing to confront the brutal facts.  Collaborative: the Board is your partner—and boss. © Signature Resources 2015 57
  58. 58. Committee Contributions to High Performance Governance  Speak to the deliverable you were asked to address.  A clear annual work plan and specific individual assignments for each meeting.  Create a culture of inquiry: assure a broad spectrum scan has supported your deliberations—this includes best practices everywhere. Challenge assumptions.  Remove Klingons, Divas, and other non-leader life forms.  Never surprise the Board—inoculate early & seek advice.  Allow for a minority report if the committee is split.  Annually report accomplishment but also suggest future direction. © Signature Resources 2015 58
  59. 59. Chairperson Assessments:  Advanced agendas guide our deliberations.  Ample dialogue with balanced participation is assured.  Minutes are kept and transparent to all (48 hr. turnaround).  Members are held accountable for contributions or replaced.  Any presentation—member or guest—is guided by “Executive Summary” guidelines:  Begin with the bottom line and move backwards.  Summarize key information—let the group decide how much detail they need.  Recommendations also in Executive Summary Format! © Signature Resources 2015 59
  60. 60. The “Flipped Meeting / Presentation” and Executive Summaries A Demonstration © Signature Resources 2015 60
  61. 61. Linking Personal Leadership and Governance Leadership Personal Leadership Governance Leadership Servant Leadership Listen, inclusive input, responsive, transparent, engage Develop others Beyond clinical to leadership Transformational voice & coach Pay attention to the changing Association models and best practices—change AANA accordingly; transparent plans “Common energizing Vision” Inclusive input into the future; Teach members about changing models; Benchmark with other State Associations doing exciting things © Signature Resources 2015 61
  62. 62. Reading can help you meet new friends  Twelve Principles of Governance that Power Exceptional Boards (BoardSource 2005) Owning UP: The 14 Questions Every Board Member Needs to Ask (Ram Charan, 2009) Governance as Leadership: Reframing the Work of Nonprofit Boards (Richard Chait, et. al., 2005) 21st Century Governance (Les Wallace, 2013) © Signature Resources 2015 62
  63. 63. 21st Century Governance  Boards as Committees (‘50s-’60s) CEO Driven  Boards as Managers (’60s-’70s) Operational / Fiduciary  Boards as Trustees (‘80s-90’s) Policy and Strategy (John Carver) 21st Century Boards Transformational Leaders“Board of Directors must be a strategic asset.” © Signature Resources 2015 63
  64. 64. “Nothing ages faster than the future.” David Carr All centuries are different as the velocity and complexity of change accelerates. Every generation finds their traditional models of doing business tested by new ideas & demands on leadership. © Signature Resources 2015 64 “The problem is never how to get new innovative thoughts into your mind, but how to get the old ones out.” Dee Hoc, Retired CEO Visa Card Executive
  65. 65. 21C… It’s Quite Different Speed: blinding, touching every aspect of life. Complexity: quantum leap in mix of related forces. Risk: upheaval raises threats and risks of “new ideas.” Change: radical, drastic, sudden. Surprise: unimaginable—challenging sensibility & logic. Disrupters: new models unleashed in traditional domains. Enterprise Size: complexity, geographical spread, enterprise culture, governance competency, speed of decision making are all impacted. © Signature Resources 2015 65
  66. 66. Today’s Governance From the Literature NACD Public Company Governance Survey, Nat. Association of Corp. Directors (2014) “What Directors Think” (2014), Spencer Stuart © Signature Resources 2015 priorities for Boards from national surveys: ① Strategic planning and oversight. ② Board composition. ③ Board refresh. ④ Risk oversight. ⑤ Regular board assessments are considered very effective by 85% of the survey population. 66
  67. 67. Today’s Governance From the Literature © Signature Resources 2015  Majority of meeting time invested in “strategically focused agenda.”  Competency based director nominations.  Competency development of directors receives serious focus--40 hrs. a year [3.3 hrs. a month].  Governance Self-assessments become annual routines.  Are these themes surfacing with your Board? 67
  68. 68. A High Performance Governance Discipline © Signature Resources 2015 68
  69. 69. Basic Fiduciary Competence and Organizational Performance Competent  Financial stability with ample operating reserve.  Regulatory compliance with few to no exceptions.  In healthcare—consistently meeting quality standards.  Constituent satisfaction and value confirmed regularly.  CEO / Executive Director board partnership with open communication, goal setting and regular feedback.  Meetings / Boardroom dynamics efficient and focused.  By-laws, policies up-to-date.  Board competent and committed. © Signature Resources 2015 69
  70. 70. Applying Competency Theory © Signature Resources 2015 70
  71. 71. Future Governing Boards © Signature Resources 2015 “In the not to distant future, new board members, at all levels of enterprise--from community organization to corporations--will be required to ‘certify governance competency’ to quality for an appointment / election.” Les Wallace  71
  72. 72. Future Governing Boards on the move! © Signature Resources 2015 72
  73. 73. Exceeding Fiduciary Competence and Organizational Performance Exceeding Competent  Meeting agendas are strategic and high priority focused vs operational & activity based. 50%-70% strategic!  Real time assessment* of effectiveness following each board meeting.  Annual self-assessments and development plans drive improvement.  Minimum committees.  All committees / task forces have written charters and clearly identified outcomes or deliverable expectations.  Committee charters reviewed every couple of years.  Officer development program assures competent officers get elected.  A dose of governance leadership development at every meeting (+/- 15 minutes) e.g. compliance refresh, board’s role in organizational culture, board succession planning, etc.). [Ave director education investment 22.1 hrs. each per NACD 2012-13 survey] *Assessment: http://www.slideshare.net/LesWallace/board-self-assessment © Signature Resources 2015 73
  74. 74. 21st Century Meeting Agendas Five Agenda Domains in Priority Order 1. Convene 2. Consent Agenda 3. Financial tracking / planning Items 4. Strategic Agenda Items (tied to current or developing strategic issues) 5. Executive Session to Assess Meeting © Signature Resources 2015 74
  75. 75. Executive Summaries and “Flipped” Presentations © Signature Resources 2015 75 “Flip That Meeting…” www.signatureresources.com/about-us/nine-minute-mentor
  76. 76. Exceeding Fiduciary Competence and Organizational Performance Exceeding Competent  Board makeup mirrors geographic and demographic footprint of organization.  Board job descriptions identify leadership competencies required [posted on organizational web site] (nominations, interviews, screening confirm competencies).  Term limits (officers and board seats) assures governance refresh and infusion of fresh eyes / new competencies.  Governance leadership succession program in place develops future leaders from the field early…1-3 years out. This Workshop!!!!!!!!  Balanced scorecard “dashboard” provides efficient and competent oversight vs information overload and helps the board stay out of the weeds. © Signature Resources 2015 76
  77. 77. Exceeding Competent Performance Oversight: Uses a Balanced Scorecard/Measures Dashboard  Monitoring a set of “indicators” across the “balance” of the organization’s work.  Distilling the “cattle call” of numbers and progress reports from management into a visual report card. “Balanced Scorecard: Measures that Drive Performance,” Kaplan/Norton HBR 2/1/2000. Research on Malcolm Baldridge Award Winners © Signature Resources 2015 77
  78. 78. Competent Performance Oversight: The Balanced Scorecard/Measures Dashboard Business Performance Constituent Performance Employee Engagement / Organizational Culture  Budget performance  Capital investments  Operating reserve  Business expansion performance  Individual services performance Robert Kaplan, Balanced Scorecard  Quality metrics  Constituent value tracking  Constituent satisfaction  Products / site specific metrics  Community brand measures Harry Beckwith, Selling the Invisible  Employee climate survey  Employee retention  Employee development  Leadership development  Talent succession  Employee ideas adopted  Internal customer surveys (tech., HR, purchasing, facilities, etc.) Marcus Buckingham, First, Break all the Rules © Signature Resources 2015 78 Other categories are common: “Learning and Growth,” “Internal Processes,” “Corporate Social Responsibility.”
  79. 79. High Performance Governance Member Conversations  At least 2-4 times a year checks on “customer/constituent” value and satisfaction (two different issues). Satisfaction =  Value = meets my needs.  Board voice represents a broad & diverse spectrum of stakeholders.  Strategic agenda helps brand the organization as keeping up.  Robust & open communication strategy links community to Board: Newsletter, Tweets, Facebook, dynamic website, communities blogs—keep community informed in real time—a local branding strategy!  Interact with your members via Facebook, Twitter, A Blog! Two way communication.  Be alert to the era of “Ratocracy:” on-line ratings and critiques. © Signature Resources 2015 79
  80. 80. The “3A” Member Value Proposition “I get what I need.” “What could we do to add even greater value to you our constituents…? Access to: information, services, sites, partners, etc. Appropriate: do products / services fit customer needs. What’s missing? Acceptable: customers well informed, products delivered in a way that meets needs, services meet industry standards (Parallel or ahead of peer group benchmark). © Signature Resources 2015 80
  81. 81. Member Satisfaction CPR™ “I’m happy” “How well did we deliver on the following… Courteous Service: courteous and timely service and treatment through each contact point and across the service continuum and all engagements with the system. Providing Information: timely, available, accurate, transparent, keeps me well informed as a customer, identifies options.? Responding to individual circumstances: dealing with problems and goofs, helping me in an emergency, referring me to helpful solutions/assistance, protecting my interests—warning me of risks. © Signature Resources 2015 81
  82. 82. High Performance Governance Transparent / Dialogic Tone  Unrushed board agendas assure generative dialogue occurs with 50%-70% of board agenda (Richard Chait, Governance as Leadership) . Characterized by candid discussions with appreciative respect for diverse points of view (“When we all think alike no one thinks at all”).  NACD recommends minutes register the extent and depth of debate / deliberation.  Board votes noted by name!  Transparent—no back room agendas, limited use of “executive / closed session.”  Transparent--robust information available to constituents through dynamic web site / publications (board credentials, Ethics and values statement, corporate social responsibility statement, IRS 990 for the tax exempt, etc.).  Committee / task force proceedings available to the board in real time. (Draft minutes available within 48 hours). © Signature Resources 2015 82
  83. 83. Strategic Focus Next Up for Discussion © Signature Resources 2015 83 What do you notice about this Board picture?
  84. 84. © Signature Resources 2015 84 Meetings / agendas Performance oversight / tracking Scorecards Board makeup, development, job descriptions Enterprise Risk Management Board’s role in organizational culture Board self-assessment Committees / charters
  85. 85. “Role of the Board Chairperson” A Flipped presentation / Discussion! © Signature Resources 2015 85
  86. 86. © Signature Resources 2015 Strategy in the 21st Century 86
  87. 87. 21st Century Governance and Strategy 21st Century Boards Transformational Leaders The Board should be a strategic asset to the organization! What’s the implication for board makeup? © Signature Resources 2015 87
  88. 88. Boards as Transformational Leaders © Signature Resources 2015 Challenge assumptions & models Benchmark products / performance with peer group Empower voice of the Customer Commit to change Move with deliberate speed on the vital few 88
  89. 89. Strategy and the VUCA Future U.S. Army War College 1990’s  Volatility  Uncertainty  Complexity  Ambiguity “Permanent Whitewater.” Peter Vaill (Learning as a Way of Being) “The New Normal.” Warren Buffet © Signature Resources 2015 89 “Changes in Attitudes Changes in Latitudes”
  90. 90. © Signature Resources 2015 90 Is your Board Made Up of Strategic Thinkers and Transformational Leaders?  If you’re not changing your dying!  Risk aversion is a bad board characteristic; risk assessment is an important competency.  Experience with the social and organizational technology of change and transformation is important.  It’s important to be able to think in “scenarios” rather than focus on a single model.
  91. 91. © Signature Resources 2015 91 Strategy is about Transforming the Organization to Remain Viable, Valuable, and Vibrant! So your board needs to be…  Strategic thinkers.  Change compatible.  Focused on transformation of the enterprise.  Effectively navigating changing funding, regulatory and constituent demands.  Strategic planning looking three to five years out.  Annually refreshing the strategic plan.
  92. 92. High Performance Governance Strategic  Strategic plan in place looking 3-5 years out.  70% of board agenda devoted to strategic topics—future facing. (Meetings: 30% fiduciary; 70% strategic)  Tracking / discussions of “emerging” strategy & shifts.  Discussion of “disruptions in your industry.”  Annual refresh of strategic plan.  Inclusive input from constituent leaders on strategic plan:  Past board members  Focus groups of constituents by segment (e.g. generational, geographical, community leaders, opinion leaders, local business, etc.)  External subject matter experts  Staff! Inclusive input does not mean they vote on strategy. © Signature Resources 2015 92
  93. 93. High Performance Governance  Where are we? Get a good grip on reality.  Where could we be that’s more desirable? Think big, dream, be innovative.  How do we get there? Execution is crucial!  What is the strategic and financial impact? Measurable outcomes! © Signature Resources 2015 93
  94. 94. Typical Foundations for Association Strategy Achieving sound association management  Operational excellence  Board support/partnership Achieving sound financial management  Budget and reserve investments  Literate/active finance committee; dashboard tracking Member engagement  Meetings / events; web site; services; clinical CE  Value tracking/voluminous input  Professional leadership development Robust advocacy / governmental relations  Practice scope and reimbursement issues  PR  Collaboration with other nursing and healthcare groups Leadership succession  Governance leadership development down to local levels  Mentor programs  Board development  Student engagement © Signature Resources 2015 94
  95. 95. 21st Century Leadership: Strategic Thinking Strategic Planning: “What is our desired business position and how must we change to get there?” Strategic Thinking: “How might we re-design our business to leverage leading edge marketplace and business models?”  Identifying an alternative future position  Anticipating opportunity and threats  Setting change priorities  Designing change pathways  Evolving / adapting systems  Outlining formal plans  Three-five year cycle  Course corrections regularly  Challenging core business assumptions  Re-inventing the business  Exploration of new paradigms  Sponsoring paradigm shifts / pilot tests  Bold innovative movement  Confirming customer value shifts  Projecting / anticipating lifecycles of products, services, organizational model © Signature Resources 2015 95
  96. 96. Some Typical Mistakes of Organizational Strategy: The Tatooed lady and the Alligator Man! © Signature Resources 2015 96 “Complexity is the enemy of execution.”
  97. 97. Awake for Questions © Signature Resources 2015 97
  98. 98. Final Exam You will act on something to advance governance leadership! What might that be? © Signature Resources Inc. 2015 98
  99. 99. Les Wallace, Ph.D. President, Signature Resources Inc. Les@signatureresources.com  Dr. Wallace is recognized for tracking business environment and workplace trends and their impact upon business and government. His publications have appeared in Leadership Excellence, Personnel Journal, Credit Union Management, Public Management, and Nation's Business as well as numerous research and conference proceedings. His latest book, co-authored with Dr. Jim Trinka, A Legacy of 21st Century Leadership, outlines the leadership organizations need in a global, fast moving business environment. His book, Principles of 21st Century Governance (2013) is being used by many boards in the profit and not-for-profit sectors to design governance development approaches.  His new book, Personal Success in a Team Environment (2014) is used by individuals and organizations to improve teamwork, career building and success at work.  Les is a frequent consultant and speaker on issues of organizational transformation and leadership, employee engagement, strategic thinking and board of directors development and governance. His clients include Fortune 100 businesses, Government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations world-wide. Dr. Wallace is also the host resource on the 9Minute Mentor, a series short video tutorials governance.  Les has served on the Board of Security First Bank and currently serves on the international Boards of the World Future Society and Counterpart International. He is a member of the National Association of Corporate Directors. Les writes an on-line column for CUES Center for Credit Union Board Education.  Preview his video series on governance: www.signatureresources “Dr. Wallace on Camera.”  https://twitter.com/9MinuteMentor © Signature Resources 2014 99

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • How the mighty fall.
  • The age of the heroic leader is over. The man or woman …

×