Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.
intead.com
Degree
Programs
Training
Communication Optimize
Best Practice
Students
India
China
CanadaAgent
Vietnam
Marketin...
 
 
Table of Academic Industry Contributors
The following industry professionals shared their experience for all of our be...
 
 
1 
 
 
 
 
 
Once again, Intead has produced a thoughtful analysis of an important 
development in international educa...
 
 
2 
Acknowledgments
We would like to thank all contributors for their helpful collaboration on this e‐book. 
We relied ...
 
 
3 
4. Finding the Right Agents for Your Institution ..................................................... 25	
Identify...
 
 
4 
About the Authors
Michael Waxman‐Lenz and Lisa Cynamon Mayers are the authors of the popular 
compendium 88 Ways to...
 
 
5 
managed a venture capital fund. His previous work experience includes his position 
as a manager in Ernst & Young’s...
 
 
6 
To Our Readers
Recruiting students from around the world is complicated stuff. Cultural differences aside, 
simple ...
 
 
7 
1. Executive Summary
Agent recruitment has an air of picking the easy and cheap way to find students as 
opposed to...
 
 
8 
2. Introduction
Overview
We are going to cover the practical implementation issues of managing an agent‐
based recr...
 
 
9 
both secondary school and college admission counselors,” has been vocal in the great 
agent debate. Over the last t...
 
 
10 
 
Research Methodology
Our research selection was by definition a skewed sample since we focused heavily on 
AIRC ...
 
 
11 
Agency recruitment is just another recruitment channel
During our conversations, we heard frequently that agency r...
 
 
12 
In the end, services and products are sold to an end consumer.  Let’s use an example 
with which you may be very f...
 
 
13 
What motivates and drives agents?
While in the US we are quick to distinguish between agents and independent colle...
 
 
14 
school; the institution must develop a brand and marketing package that clearly 
explains why international studen...
 
 
15 
How’s this as a comparison? When you want to buy a new appliance, say a TV, do 
you look at some kind of consumer ...
 
 
16 
3. Getting Started
Seven Steps to Building an Agent Network
1. Get Senior Leadership onboard: Provost and Presiden...
 
 
17 
Agent Management within a Strategic Framework
George Burke, who recently retired from Cleveland State University, ...
 
 
18 
In some instances, the process is driven by the strategic decision to partner with an 
organization that has large...
 
 
19 
international enrollment infrastructures, including its own professionally managed 
travel team and institutional ...
 
 
20 
We found only a limited number of specific systems dedicated to supporting the 
agency marketing administration pr...
 
 
21 
What Do Agents Do?
Services Most Often Provided by Education Agents  
Source: Hobsons 2007
Since they are on the g...
 
 
22 
Agents will provide the basic services in 
selecting and applying to universities. But 
many agencies have added s...
 
 
23 
Building Consensus
You work in academic institutions, so 
we know the importance of research to 
you. We went deep...
 
 
24 
Below we provide a diagram displaying the different phases of your work. This chart 
may help to demonstrate to in...
 
 
25 
4. Finding the Right Agents for Your Institution
Identifying Agents
If you are a somewhat visible college or unive...
 
 
26 
We have also seen LinkedIn groups frequently used as forums for additional agent 
recommendations or requests for ...
 
 
27 
Post Information on Your Website
Canadian universities have a much longer history of using agents than their Ameri...
 
 
28 
Buy lists of agent brokers
We have seen offers to buy lists of agents by 
country or region. We don’t know the qua...
 
 
29 
guidelines of their respective organizations but in most cases (maybe all) there is no 
enforcement mechanism othe...
 
 
30 
 
 
AIRC (American International Recruitment Council)
In the United States, AIRC is a standard‐setting organizatio...
 
 
31 
Who manages the largest agent networks?
This publication focuses on agency agreements for college‐ and university‐...
 
 
32 
Who is looking for whom and is the tide turning?
We have given you a solid list of ways to 
identify appropriate a...
 
 
33 
Agent Qualities and Qualifications
As with all other professional relationships, you need to feel comfortable with...
 
 
34 
existence to guide institutions in their work with agents. So, the idea was to inform US 
institutions that they w...
 
 
35 
We will talk in greater detail in section 7 about the situation in Australia. But we 
should point out that the US...
 
 
36 
5. Onboarding, Training and Communication
Experienced agents and university recruiters stress the importance of on...
 
 
37 
Link to ICEF/IDP Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/24973225 
 
 
38 
Signing the Contractual Agreement
At the outset both parties, the institution and the agency, must agree to certai...
 
 
39 
We must emphasize that it is critically important to building trust that the entire 
agency fee structure be trans...
 
 
40 
school counselors visit campus to learn, feel, experience and understand your 
institution. For your agent network...
 
 
41 
Business plan
Appropriate relationship management requires setting expectations and benchmarks 
on both sides, the...
 
 
42 
While we are on the topic of promoting your programs via 
your website, you may want to consider how your website ...
 
 
43 
 
The Agent Management Process
Source: A Best Practice Guide for Agent Management, Department of Education, Traini...
 
 
44 
6. Support Organizations
Department of Commerce Commercial Service
The Department of Commerce’s (DOC) Commercial S...
 
 
45 
help to create a transparent and more professionally managed process by universities 
and agencies. This may help ...
 
 
46 
7. International Comparison
The Australian Experience
Australian universities, and to a similar extent British and...
 
 
47 
The Australian government introduced a rating system connected with visa issuance 
that sanctions institutions. Au...
 
 
48 
and four‐year colleges and universities. All 40 Australian universities have a large 
percentage of international ...
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Intead Agent Management E-book
Nächste SlideShare
Wird geladen in …5
×

Intead Agent Management E-book

259 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

Student Counselors and Agents: Building and Managing Your International Network.

Recruiting students from around the world is complicated stuff. Cultural differences aside, simple barriers to technology can keep your outreach efforts from reaching your target audience.

Copyright: Intead

Veröffentlicht in: Bildung
  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

  • Gehören Sie zu den Ersten, denen das gefällt!

Intead Agent Management E-book

  1. 1. intead.com Degree Programs Training Communication Optimize Best Practice Students India China CanadaAgent Vietnam Marketing Channels Optimize Verification Egypt Saudi Arabia Dubai Fam Tours Recruiting International Tours Core Values Commissions Digital Tools International Borders Russia Insurance South Korea Australia Test Scores Global Reach United States Graduate Students Language Skills Rank Outcomes Intercultural Understanding Undergraduate Students Guidance Overseas Enrollment Communication Trust Visa Assistance Marketing Support Credentials Enrollment Counselor Responsiveness Verification Relationship Building Co-Marketing Student Counselors and Agents: Building and Managing Your International Network
  2. 2.     Table of Academic Industry Contributors The following industry professionals shared their experience for all of our benefit. The interviews conducted with  each of them added valuable insight and we thank each them for their generosity of wisdom and time.  We want to be clear: none of the individuals listed below or mentioned in this e‐book endorsed any particular  recruiting approach on behalf of their affiliated institution. We apologize for any inadvertent omissions of  conversations. (Alphabetically by last name)   Ahmed, Angel, Full Sail University   Arredondo, David, Lorain County Community  College   Badde, Markus, ICEF   Bahan, Rebecca, Fontbonne University   Behnke, Andrew, EMC   Boyd, Steven, University of Bridgeport    Brown, Rebecca, Humboldt State University, CA   Burke, George, retired (previously Cleveland State  University)   Brunner, Dan, Davis College   Chan, Sonia, Swinburne University of Technology   Chaulk, Elizabeth, Northern Kentucky University   Cullen, Tony, Navitas    Cushing, Ron, University of Cincinnati   DiMaria, David, Kent State University, OH   John Deupree, AIRC   Joseph DeCrosta, Duquesne University   Eisenhardt, Andrew, Drexel University    Gerdeman, Penny University of Findlay    Greenfield, Shawn, University of Idaho    Griffith, Ryan, Upper Iowa University    Grover, Colleen, Husson University, Maine    Hallett, Mark Hallett, Colorado State University   Hansen, Mandy, Northern Arizona University    Heriza, May, Montana University    Hilpipre‐Frischman, Christina, University Of Saint  Thomas   Hofmann, Paul, California State University, Fresno   Leventhal, Mitch, SUNY   Littlefield, Tony, Washington College   Lokken, Jay, University Of Wisconsin‐La Crosse   McGinnis, John, Birmingham Southern College   McGrenra, Shamus, St. Francis University   Morales, Rachel, University Of Southern Maine   Moreno, Georgina Herrera, Bridge‐Linguatec   Morris, Fiona, The University of Sydney    Nelligan, Anthony, University of Melbourne    Northup, Krista, SUNY   Price, Chris, Adventus Education   Provoost, Greet, University of Mississippi    Schellenberger, Christie, Wilfid Laurier University   Schwartz, Charlie, University of Cincinnati   Skinner, Sam, University Of Hartford    Spellman, Joseph, University Of New Haven    Stremba, David, INTO University Partnerships    Swan, Sonia, University of Swinburne   Thorne, Debbie, Texas State University    Trecartin, Ralph, SUNY Brockport    Tully, Sara, University of Wisconsin‐Milwaukee   Van Rooyen, Patrick, Navitas   Weinberg, Amy, Bridge‐Linguatec   Wilkerson, Charles, Tennessee Tech University    Wood, John, Navitas 
  3. 3.     1            Once again, Intead has produced a thoughtful analysis of an important  development in international education. This monograph will be useful to any  institution considering an agency‐based recruitment strategy, as well as  institutions which are already on this path.   ~ Mitch Leventhal, PhD, Vice Chancellor for Global Affairs, The State University of New York System            Student Counselors and Agents: Building and Managing Your International  Network, Published by International Education Advantage, © November 2013, All  Rights Reserved.   
  4. 4.     2  Acknowledgments We would like to thank all contributors for their helpful collaboration on this e‐book.  We relied on all the insights from our colleagues at universities, colleges, language and  boarding schools as well as non‐for‐profit and for‐profit company partners (see our list  of Academic Industry Contributors on the inside front cover).   We appreciate Christopher Clark’s and DJ Burgess’ creative design concepts. Elizabeth  Prouty contributed her editing skills, in particular, modifying Michael’s German  sentence structure. Ben Waxman provided valuable clarifications throughout the  process.  It takes a team; we’ve got a great one.   Contents Table of Academic Industry Contributors Acknowledgments ...................................................................................................................... 2 About the Authors ...................................................................................................................... 4 To Our Readers ............................................................................................................................ 6 1. Executive Summary ............................................................................................................ 7 2. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 8 Overview ...................................................................................................................................... 8 What is an Agent? ....................................................................................................................... 8 The Agent Debate ....................................................................................................................... 8 Research Methodology ............................................................................................................ 10 Agency recruitment is just another recruitment channel ................................................ 11 Can this recruitment channel work for all types of schools? .......................................... 11 B2B versus B2C .......................................................................................................................... 11 What motivates and drives agents? ...................................................................................... 13 3. Getting Started ..................................................................................................................... 16 Seven Steps to Building an Agent Network ....................................................................... 16 Marketing Channels and Systems ........................................................................................ 19 Big Picture: Marketing Strategy and the Role of Agents ................................................. 20 What Do Agents Do? ............................................................................................................... 21 Building Consensus .................................................................................................................. 23
  5. 5.     3  4. Finding the Right Agents for Your Institution ..................................................... 25 Identifying Agents .................................................................................................................... 25 Who manages the largest agent networks? ........................................................................ 31 Agent Qualities and Qualifications ....................................................................................... 33 The Cincinnati Principles—Guidelines for Success in Recruiting ................................. 33 5. Onboarding, Training and Communication ......................................................... 36 Signing the Contractual Agreement ..................................................................................... 38 Follow up .................................................................................................................................... 39 Agent visit programs ............................................................................................................... 39 ICEF FAM tours ........................................................................................................................ 40 Agent management tools ........................................................................................................ 40 Business plan .............................................................................................................................. 41 Promoting agent activities on your university website ................................................... 41 Contract renewal ....................................................................................................................... 42 6. Support Organizations ..................................................................................................... 44 Department of Commerce Commercial Service ................................................................ 44 NAFSA ........................................................................................................................................ 44 AIRC ............................................................................................................................................ 44 7. International Comparison .............................................................................................. 46 The Australian Experience ...................................................................................................... 46 The UK experience .................................................................................................................... 52 8. Conclusion ............................................................................................................................. 53 9. Appendix ................................................................................................................................. 55 Valuable Information Sources, Media Coverage and Training Material ..................... 55 Various authors and sources .................................................................................................. 55 Support Svcs for Campus Internationalization & Agent Network Management ..... 56 Australia Specific Resources ................................................................................................... 57 10. Give Feedback ................................................................................................................... 58 
  6. 6.     4  About the Authors Michael Waxman‐Lenz and Lisa Cynamon Mayers are the authors of the popular  compendium 88 Ways to Recruit International Students, which has been  downloaded several thousand times on the Intead website and through the Kindle  store. World travelers and education industry professionals with experience in the  classroom and the admissions office, the authors are pleased to share their insights  with you.   Thank you for taking an interest.    Michael Waxman-Lenz Co-founder and CEO of International Education Advantage, LLC Michael arrived in the United States as an international graduate student from  Germany, which gives him a personal understanding of the needs and challenges of  students studying outside their home countries. His twenty‐five‐year career spans  activities in technology, academia and doing business around the world. Michael provides a deep understanding of international markets and how to deploy  digital technology creatively and effectively for the international marketing and  student enrollment process. Prior to co‐founding Intead, Michael spent ten years in  various senior executive functions at the Digital Media Division of a consumer  products company, rising to General Manager. As VP of Business Development for an  internet start‐up company, he was responsible for strategic partnerships and digital  content. Prior to that position, Michael lived in Central Asia for five years and 
  7. 7.     5  managed a venture capital fund. His previous work experience includes his position  as a manager in Ernst & Young’s International Finance Group. Michael has taught as an adjunct professor at Baldwin‐Wallace University and John  Carroll University. His academic credentials include a Chartered Financial Analyst  (CFA) charter, a Masters from Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), and studies at the  University of Konstanz in Germany and Kingston University in London. His  executive education includes courses at Harvard Business School, Stanford Business  School and Case Western Reserve University’s Weatherhead School of Business. Lisa Cynamon Mayers Academic Advisor, International Education Advantage, LLC Lisa has spent more than twelve years working in undergraduate admissions and  college counseling and now provides guidance on the application and admissions  processes for Intead’s clients. Lisa worked at Washington University as a Senior Assistant Director of  Undergraduate Admissions. She was responsible for the Northeast region, led the  admissions committee for the School of Architecture, and coordinated the Student  Admission Committee (including the tour guide program). Throughout Lisa’s years of  graduate study at Case Western Reserve University, she worked with the admissions  office on projects including interviewing prospective students and revamping the  campus tour program. Recently she served as an international application reviewer  for Case. For the past ten years, Lisa has worked as an independent college counselor, guiding  American and international high school students and their parents through the college  admissions process. Lisa was a keynote speaker at the 2008 Inside Ivy Conference in  Seoul, South Korea, organized by the Princeton Review Korea and Road to College.  As a speaker and published writer on the subject of college admissions, Lisa has been  able to advise countless students and parents. Lisa is a featured writer for the book  Getting to the Quad. She earned a BA from Washington University in St. Louis and an  MA from Case Western Reserve University.  Feedback is welcome and encouraged Please share your feedback on this book and your own experience with agents:   Michael Waxman‐Lenz: michaelwl@intead.com    Lisa Cynamon Mayers: lcynamonmayers@intead.com
  8. 8.     6  To Our Readers Recruiting students from around the world is complicated stuff. Cultural differences aside,  simple barriers to technology can keep your outreach efforts from reaching your target audience. At Intead we understand the factors driving US academic institutions to seek international  students. Administrators consider not only the valuable cultural exchange a diverse campus  brings but also the economic benefit of full‐paying students.  The agency recruitment channel has a particular history within US higher education and has  been more controversial than other methods. No other recruiting method seems to be scrutinized  as much for effectiveness or return on investment.  Even as schools across the country plan to increase the number of international students on their  campuses, they grapple with the marketing challenges of finding and enrolling these students  while making the educational experience valuable for everyone involved. With these motivations and challenges in mind, Intead offers its first edition guide to building,  managing and growing an international student recruitment network using education agents. US higher education institutions should be developing the same knowledge base as their  counterparts in Australia, the UK and Canada. The experience of institutions in those countries  can be invaluable in helping US colleges and universities avoid mistakes. AIRC, the American  International Recruitment Council, is certainly one attempt to incorporate lessons learned, while  providing a standard‐setting organization We hope you will find new ideas and gain perspective on what can be a daunting undertaking.  This resource is available to help our community of international enrollment professionals learn  from us, and each other. Building, growing and maintaining a productive agency‐based recruitment network around the  world will take time, significant effort, internal and external resources and dedicated staff to  build and maintain global relationships.  We can all learn from each other as we enter new international markets and figure out what  works. And as we all get better at this and communicate those attributes that make our  institutions stand out from each other, more international students will land in the academic  programs that best meet their needs. And that result is what we all want: well‐placed and well‐prepared international students to  complement the domestic student population at our schools. We look forward to collaborating with you.
  9. 9.     7  1. Executive Summary Agent recruitment has an air of picking the easy and cheap way to find students as  opposed to the typical US domestic student recruiting process of visiting high schools  and attending college fairs. Our research shows that successful recruiting via agents is  neither easy nor inexpensive. Building,  supporting and managing an agent network  requires initial investment and ongoing  commitment and resources.  In interviewing more than 50 professionals in  this field, we found those adding this recruiting  channel had deliberate strategic and practical  reasons to do so. Here we highlight the  advantages and value of agent recruiting:   Consistent presence in the country with  local representatives and offices versus  fly‐in/fly‐outadmissions officers   Local cultural understanding of the education tradition and an ability to  convey the complex US admissions process   Language facility and ability to communicate with students and parents    A successful, well‐designed and managed agent recruiting channel requires:  o Ongoing support internally and externally o Thoughtful selection, evaluation and monitoring of the partner agencies  o Consistent and repeated training of agents o Direct personal interaction and communication via as many channels as  possible (visits in‐country, visits by agents to the institution, email, phone,  video conferencing)   o Consistent evaluation of results  o Fair and prompt compensation to agents
  10. 10.     8  2. Introduction Overview We are going to cover the practical implementation issues of managing an agent‐ based recruitment network for most types of educational institutions. We talked to  people affiliated with over 50 colleges and universities about their recruitment needs.  We also surveyed ESL programs, language schools and boarding schools. The issues  we address will be similar for language schools and boarding schools, but we focus on  the college market due to the greater complexity of programs, admissions  requirements, accreditations, state requirements, etc. What is an Agent? Before we can discuss how to develop an agent network, good qualities to seek in an  agent, and other tips of the trade, it’s worthwhile  to first unpack the definition of an agent.   Agent, noun, ˈā‐jənt, a person who does  business for another person: a person who acts on  behalf of another. (Source: Merriam Webster Online  Dictionary) We want to focus on the latter half of the  definition—“a person who acts on behalf of another.” In every business arena, agents  serve a critical role—real estate, sports, law, travel, to name a few. In education, the  agent—also known as international education agent, educational counselor, or  independent counselor—acts on behalf of the student and his/her parents and the  college or university to ease the process of learning about the institution, applying,  and enrolling. The agent serves the needs of both the student and the university. It is a  triangular partnership: everyone could coordinate individually, but the agent provides  the conduit for easier interaction for the other two parties.   The Agent Debate Though we are certainly aware of it, we will  disregard the question and debate in the United  States as to whether it is appropriate to use agents.  The purpose of this e‐book is not to focus on the  debate around agents, but rather to provide a  roadmap for those institutions that have already  made the decision to work with agents. The National Association for College  Admission Counseling (NACAC), which “strives to support and advance the work of  The world is full of agents – when you buy a house,  book a holiday, prepare documents. Athletes use  sports agents. Writers use literary agents.    ~ Markus Badde, CEO, ICEF  Agents can help institutions better understand the  local education market. They often are effective  inroads to the region. ~ Joseph DeCrosta,  Director of International Programs, Duquesne  University 
  11. 11.     9  both secondary school and college admission counselors,” has been vocal in the great  agent debate. Over the last two years, a NACAC Commission was tasked to review  the use of agents in member organizations. At the 2013 NACAC Toronto conference,  the commission issued a recommendation for member organizations that allowed for  the use of agents. The recent NACAC decision will, in our view, broaden the number  of schools that admit using agents and  encourage others to enter this recruiting  channel. It is your professional judgment  whether or not to use agents. It is your decision to admit students qualified and  capable of completing your programs. We  believe that the use of agents is an  appropriate marketing channel, if managed  professionally.   We are most familiar with the US higher  education market, yet we know that the principles will apply to all other markets as  well. We researched and talked with a number of Australian and UK institutions; both  are markets with much longer and stronger traditions of using commission‐based  agents to recruit international students.   Commission‐based agents are not a panacea. They require significant support and  management. You will also find varying levels of quality among these professionals.  Agents are used widely around the world. The majority of Australian, British and  Canadian universities use them as part of their extended marketing reach.   In Australia, the majority of international students are recruited with agent support.  We haven’t seen any official estimates of the percentage of universities in the United  States working with agents. Our own research among 100 NAFSA members indicates  40 percent were using commission‐based agents. The American International  Recruitment Council (AIRC ‐ http://airc‐education.org) has more than 200 academic  members that in principle will at  least consider, if not actively use,  agents.   These data show widespread use  of commission‐based recruiters.  Anecdotally, we believe that  many more US colleges and  universities use agents than will  admit to their use.     Parents want reassurance that their decision for  their children is correct. They want somebody who  speaks their language and is local. Agents are  facilitators in today’s market where lots of  information is available. ~ Tony Cullen, Executive  General Manager – Marketing, Navitas  University Partnerships  Imagine you are a Chinese university interested in recruiting  US students and you had a modest budget. What would be  more effective: (a) coming to the US for one week each year to  promote your institution; or (b) having a 24/7 on‐the‐ground  recruitment network working on your behalf? When the shoe is  on the other foot, why is it that most US colleges gravitate to (a)  rather than (b)? ~ Larry Green, Managing Director / EVP  Higher Education North America, Study Group 
  12. 12.     10    Research Methodology Our research selection was by definition a skewed sample since we focused heavily on  AIRC university members. AIRC is a standards development organization, officially  registered with the US Department of  Commerce and Federal Trade Commission,  which has developed a rigorous agency  certification process based on its  standards. Agencies which achieve AIRC  Certification, following external due  diligence, self‐study and external review by  examiners from member institutions, are  listed on the AIRC website. You could  compare AIRC’s work to the accreditation process for academic institutions. The  process is time intensive and expensive, so not all agencies will seek AIRC  certification. We believe these agency reviews identify a distinct level of expertise and  professionalism.  Parents are seeking trusted advice to make this  financial and time commitment. There is a massive  amount of noise in the market. ~ David Stremba,  Managing Director, North America, INTO  University Partnerships  Source: A Best Practice Guide for Agent Management, Department of Education, Training and  Employment Queensland Government, Australia 
  13. 13.     11  Agency recruitment is just another recruitment channel During our conversations, we heard frequently that agency recruitment is just another  channel in addition to direct recruitment, digital marketing, and so forth. While we  completely agree that universities should build and support a portfolio of recruiting  methods, you will also hear from us that agency recruitment can only be successful if  there is adequate support and emphasis on this channel. Signing agent agreements  without sufficient support, follow‐up, and dedication is unlikely to lead to consistent  enrollment success.   Can this recruitment channel work for all types of schools? Our answer is yes.  Understand, with few exceptions, unless this marketing channel is accepted as a  legitimate recruitment channel, supported by the institution and resourced  appropriately, the channel will not yield results.  Now let’s add a few more refinements and  caveats to that answer. We can think of  several scenarios in which you don’t need or  want agencies. Some universities don’t need agents since they have the brand, location  and/or ranking to be highly successful with  international student recruitment without  such a channel. Congratulations.  Certain universities are seeking to find a very small number of international students  to add diversity; they choose to recruit directly. Other universities want and can invest  in other direct and indirect recruitment channels.   So here’s the thing: for the vast majority of institutions, working with agents will open  an untapped channel for international student recruitment. As with most of life, the  more an institution can put into the agent relationship, the more benefits and  successes the institution will reap.  B2B versus B2C In the business world and, in particular, the Internet, we talk about two distinct  business models.   Business to Business (B2B) sales channels   Business to Consumer (B2C) sales channels  You have to know your strength. The agent cannot  sell a school alone, the university has to develop a  statement where international students can enter  [the programs] and be successful. ~ George Burke,  retired Director Center for International  Students, Cleveland State University 
  14. 14.     12  In the end, services and products are sold to an end consumer.  Let’s use an example  with which you may be very familiar: Apple computers. Historically Apple computers were sold only in electronic and department stores. So  Apple had a whole organization supporting stores such as Best Buy. The support  ranged from the logistics of how to deliver product, manage inventory, support to co‐ marketing, pricing and, of course, finance administration.  In recent years Apple  established a highly successful chain of their own company stores. Sales staff  employed by Apple, technical staff, the wonderful Genius bar, are located in their own  stores. Interestingly enough, Dell computers went exactly the opposite direction. Dell  started with a highly successful online direct sales process. The company cut out the  “middleman” retailers, and consumers would buy directly from Dell. Yet at some  point, Dell added an indirect B2B sales channel via third‐party retail stores. So, think of the general advertising, marketing and logistics of these companies. They  support the direct sales channel as well as the B2B channel. Your university marketing  is no different. While it is sometimes uncomfortable to make these commercial  comparisons to education, from our perspective, these are marketing and sales  channels with advantages and disadvantages that need to be explored, managed, and  optimized in order to bring students and educational institutions together.   For which programs do you recruit? 7.5% 17.7% 26.1% 36.0% 39.1% 46.6% 50.1% 64.4% 67.1% 71.1% .0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% Work & Travel Programmes MBA Programmes Work & Study Programmes Vocational Diploma/Further Education Secondary and High School University: Foundation University: Distance education/Online learning University: Graduate/Postgraduate University: Undergraduate Language Courses Source: ICEF –i‐Graduate Agent Barometer 2013 Base = 1,042 
  15. 15.     13  What motivates and drives agents? While in the US we are quick to distinguish between agents and independent college  counselors, many international agents don’t distinguish between the two. Good  international agents are good student counselors. While the discussion in the US is  largely focused on the compensation an agent receives for placing a student, we hear  from agents a great deal about finding the appropriate university for the student.  Parents frequently have unrealistic expectations that their son or daughter can be  placed in a well‐known or highly ranked institution. Agents advise, coach and coax  parents to expand the group of universities they consider in order to achieve their  objectives.   Ultimately, agents need to be concerned about the success of their placed students  since word of mouth is a critical part of building their business. Smaller agencies may  feel this connection between good advice and more business success more strongly  than larger agencies.  Agents are facilitators in the current environment. Parents and students have access to  a great deal of information via the media, digital channels and word of mouth. Yet  families need reassurance, additional advice and guidance on the application and  selection process, visa application in their own language, and local accessibility. Our recent podcast [LINK] with Gabriel Monteros, Director and Senior Consultant at  Xueer, an education agency in China, gives the Chinese perspective on the US college  application process.  To gain a better  understanding of  the insights of  someone on the  ground in China  working as an  agent, we encourage  you to listen to this  podcast. Before you engage  the services of  agents, you must be able to effectively articulate, in conversation and marketing  materials, the strengths of your institution. An agent cannot be expected to sell a 
  16. 16.     14  school; the institution must develop a brand and marketing package that clearly  explains why international students should consider it. Regardless of your marketing channel (B2B or direct), you need to develop a value  proposition for the international  market. In your home market,  proximity, existing alumni and a  regional brand affinity may support  your recruitment. However, many  universities are not as well‐known in  international markets. You need to  explain and “package” your  education program and in the end,  deliver a valuable educational  experience for international students. The agent cannot be expected to “sell” an  institution that is having a tough time “selling” itself. We cannot reiterate enough how often we heard that students and parents are  overwhelmed by the choices available to them. Universities around the world are  looking to add the talented, well‐qualified, fluent English‐speaking, full‐tuition‐paying  international student. Arguably, that’s why the US News & World Reports’ rankings are  so powerful in their simplicity.   Certain U.S. universities have the perception that international  students fall off trees; there is a lack of appreciation of how  savvy international students have become and how many  choices they have today. ~ Krista Northup, Director of  International Recruitment & Agency Operations, State  University of New York System Administration  Source: ICEF –i‐Graduate Agent Barometer 2013 43.5% 37.6% 48.6% 15.3% 29.8% 30.9% 45.9% 50.1% 34.8% 79.1% 62.5% 62.2% 0% 50% 100% Regular visits to education institution by you or your staff (n=763) Agent training workshops organised in the destination country (n=755) Agent training courses via the internet (n=730) Quick response times to enquiries and applications (n=757) Agent manual with fees and information (n=752) Regular communication updates (n=753) Very unimportant Unimportant Important Very important The Main Ingredients in Successful Educator-Agent Partnerships
  17. 17.     15  How’s this as a comparison? When you want to buy a new appliance, say a TV, do  you look at some kind of consumer ratings to make a decision? Most people do. With  so many varieties of TVs now on the market, most of us look for guidance to limit the  field of options as we make our choice.   A Chinese family looks at the field of 4,000 US colleges and universities and asks,  “Can someone help us narrow our choices to a reasonable number of options to  evaluate?” And so, the online rankings come to their rescue…for better or worse. But  it makes sense that we need to limit the pool of options when the options are so many.      16 187 215 117 76 75 68 29 29 18 27 14 210 37 0 50 100 150 200 250 Base = 1,118  Approximately how many institutions does your agency represent? Source: ICEF –i‐Graduate Agent Barometer 2013
  18. 18.     16  3. Getting Started Seven Steps to Building an Agent Network 1. Get Senior Leadership onboard: Provost and President need to be fully knowledgeable on the decision so that they can speak to the decision of using agents. 2. Selection of agents: What is their track record? What credentials do they hold? Who are their references and colleagues? 3. Onboarding: Once you bring an agent on board, do you have staff to establish a communication stream? Do you have a manual that effectively describes your institution? How do you train agents initially and on an on- going basis? 4. Communication: You must establish the criteria of communication: agree upon when you or your staff are available to engage, how that communication will occur, the appropriate period of time to respond to information requests from the agents. 5. Visits: In an ideal world, your staff would visit every agent you have engaged. It is important to the agency’s staff to assess their level of understanding of your institution. 6. Set expectations: From Day 1 all agents should know that they have 2 to 3 years to prove success. 7. Ongoing monitoring: You must establish the process for evaluating success. Agents must be aware of the evaluation system and all parties should agree to the terms. Three factors are mentioned consistently by those who have built agent networks:  consensus, permission and senior leadership. This isn’t a program that one person on  staff can decide to implement— ultimately, it takes a team‐based approach to find  success.  We heard repeatedly that building a (sufficient) consensus to use commission‐based  recruiters was challenging and time‐consuming but critical for many schools. We  noted several levels of political and legal consensus and permissions required within  each institution.   Source: A special thank you to George Burke for providing us with this succinct set of steps for building an agent  network. 
  19. 19.     17  Agent Management within a Strategic Framework George Burke, who recently retired from Cleveland State University, described  educating and earning the support of the provost and president as a vital step. They  need to understand the process and have the ability to respond to questions.   Sara Tully from the University of Wisconsin‐Milwaukee (UWM) noted that their state  procurement process has an important set of guidelines to help define how to  establish university‐agent negotiations and contracts. The State of Wisconsin provides  annual permission for the agent contracts.  An alternative to a large‐scale embrace of an agent network is to start with a smaller  pilot project. We talked to several universities that instituted smaller‐scale projects,  some with specific time limits. The advantage is speed: to proceed, test the waters,  learn. On the other hand, we heard from some universities about a lack of political and  resource commitment to the pilots that appeared to have hindered the likelihood of  success.  Source: A Best Practice Guide for Agent Management,  Department of Education, Training and Employment  Queensland Government, Australia 
  20. 20.     18  In some instances, the process is driven by the strategic decision to partner with an  organization that has large‐scale  agent networks in place. All the  pathway and language school  providers have extensive agent  networks and support them  with dedicated in‐country  representatives. In some  instances, schools rely heavily  on these mostly commercial partners such as INTO, NAVITAS, Kaplan, and ELS to  support the international enrollment process. For others, such a relationship is just one  of many elements of a broad internationalization and international enrollment  strategy. In several cases, the roles and responsibilities in terms for student  recruitment have shifted over time between the university and the recruiter.   An example: Northeastern University in Boston was one of the early adopters of a  pathway program with Kaplan where the latter provided the international recruiting  infrastructure. Over the last several years, Northeastern has built one of the broader  The political will of the institution has to be in place; you have  to put the means and resources in place. ~ Rebecca Brown,  Director, Center for International Programs, Humboldt  State University 
  21. 21.     19  international enrollment infrastructures, including its own professionally managed  travel team and institutional partnerships, but they have not built an agent network  as part of their internal recruitment process.  In addition, Australian and UK companies such as Navitas, INTO and StudyGroup  have entered the US market and established their first set of partnerships with US  universities. These companies bring their years of experience, expertise, in‐country  support teams and extensive agent networks to new pathway programs in  collaboration with established entities.   Scale and penetration of these pathway programs are still much smaller. They are  really in their infancy compared to their penetration and importance in the UK and  Australia. We would not be surprised if such programs gain traction in the US context  as well since they enable universities to reduce their risk. In our view, these providers  will not be interested in the hundreds of smaller US colleges.  Marketing Channels and Systems In the domestic admissions marketing process, we encounter a number of strong  influencers and key events that do not exist for most international students. We are  thinking in particular of high school counselors and the campus visit.   Universities pay a great deal of  attention to cultivating  relationships with a network of  high school counselors. They  dedicate efforts and resources to  organizing meaningful campus  visits and off‐site programs. In the  international domain, agents—both  those paid by parents and the  commission‐based agents—play  functionally a similar role to US  high school counselors. Only international students who attend American or  international schools are likely to have access to American‐style college counselors  within the school system. Efficiency can be created via IT support. While it may seem overwhelming at first to  engage numerous agents around the world, digital resources exist to make the  relationships easier to manage. Tools that allow you to send regular email or  newsletter updates, participate in webinars, and control record keeping are some of  the ways that technology can help you to manage your agent network.  US colleges have long had the demographic curve in their favor.  But the curve has shifted and one consequence is that  competition for foreign students is now intense. Unless you  have the luxury of being a well‐ branded and highly ranked  college, tapping into a well‐managed agent network is the most  effective means to reach these in‐demand students. ~ Larry  Green, Managing Director / EVP Higher Education North  America, Study Group 
  22. 22.     20  We found only a limited number of specific systems dedicated to supporting the  agency marketing administration process. In most instances, it appears that  universities add a dedicated staff member to support the administrative needs of the  agency recruitment process.   Big Picture: Marketing Strategy and the Role of Agents We’d like to emphasize again that agent  recruitment needs to fit into your overall  marketing strategy. Considerations include  your mix of recruiting in various markets,  production and distribution of marketing  materials, and internal and external promotion  of the use of agents.   Certain markets will lend themselves to more high school marketing or partnerships,  while other areas, such as China, India, and smaller markets such as Nepal, are  strongly influenced by agents. In our experience, one size does not fit all. And most  marketing and recruitment marketing efforts will support each other, though you  have to be mindful of the channel conflicts and  compensation issues.   Let’s say you are attending recruitment fairs  with your agents. The agents are following up  and providing ongoing support to students  and will expect compensation even though  you may have been the first touch point.  Agents are a direct enrollment channel, and they are very valuable in providing local  market context and information. Steven Boyd from the University of Bridgeport and  many of his colleagues emphasized the local intelligence and insights obtained from  agents—what programs are attractive, what issues are encountered during the  application process, what visa issues are known and so forth.   Lastly, agent marketing can have a longer‐term positive impact on the brand visibility  of your university. Agents will  provide printed materials in their  offices and may include you in their  digital, social media and print  advertising. We’ll discuss joint  business planning with agents shortly.  Stay with us.   Agents are just a piece of the puzzle. ~ Charlie  Schwartz, Associate Director, International  Admissions, University of Cincinnati  Agent agreements need to be living documents as  opposed to papers in a filing cabinet.   ~ Paul Hofmann, Assistant Vice President for  International Affairs, California State  University, Fresno   International students are more focused on ranking than  domestic students. Programs of distinction are more important  than a broad range.” ~ Ralph Trecartin, Assistant Provost  for International Education, The College at Brockport,  State University of New York
  23. 23.     21  What Do Agents Do? Services Most Often Provided by Education Agents   Source: Hobsons 2007 Since they are on the ground in a given territory  agents are best at handling student inquiries or  leads...because they are able to follow up swiftly in the  local language. ~ Markus Badde, CEO, ICEF  Agents offer brick and mortar offices and they build a  bridge to demystify the US application process.   ~ David DiMaria, Vice President of Enrollment,  Kent State University 
  24. 24.     22  Agents will provide the basic services in  selecting and applying to universities. But  many agencies have added several other  services. The somewhat dated Hobsons survey  from 2007 provides one of the few quantified  research pieces. It does not show ESL services,  travel support and tour organization, which we  have seen in the marketplace as well.   When asked about the roles they serve, agents responded in this way:  Source: Guardian, July 2013: http://www.guardian.co.uk/    Agents can be useful cultural guides for  institutions, offering insight into their particular  region and educational systems.   ~ Joseph DeCrosta, Director of International  Programs, Duquesne University 
  25. 25.     23  Building Consensus You work in academic institutions, so  we know the importance of research to  you. We went deep into the academic  research, and we actually found an  Australian academician who wrote her  PhD thesis on how Australian  universities manage their relationships with agents. Voila—we can provide you with  empirical research.   In all seriousness, there is an empirical body of knowledge about how Australian  universities have built a strong competitive position in the world without many of the  assets other English speaking countries bring to bear, and on a broad scale.  Source: A Best Practice Guide for Agent Management, Department of  Education, Training and Employment Queensland Government, Australia  Core International Educational Agents’ Services The market has changed so that agents have the business;  now schools have to market themselves to agents.   ~ Angel Ahmed, Director of International Business  Development, Full Sail University  Source: A Best Practice Guide for Agent Management, Department of  Education, Training and Employment Queensland Government, Australia 
  26. 26.     24  Below we provide a diagram displaying the different phases of your work. This chart  may help to demonstrate to internal colleagues how thoughtful you are about the  agent recruitment process.   These summaries give you an idea of the breadth of agent activities. Now let’s move on to identifying agents that might work well for your institution. A broken line indicates possible actions that could be undertaken, but were not always necessarily  Process flow of contracting and managing education agents – empirical findings Source: A Best Practice Guide for Agent Management, Department of Education, Training and Employment Queensland  Government, Australia 
  27. 27.     25  4. Finding the Right Agents for Your Institution Identifying Agents If you are a somewhat visible college or university, you receive emails and cold calls  from various agencies. You can choose to respond, verify credentials and references,  and build your network. Chances are that if you use only this approach, you will miss  excellent, suitable agencies. Word of mouth In our experience, this is a widely used method. Admissions officers from different  institutions trust each other and they may choose to share agents with others— probably institutions that are not direct competitors. Hire admissions staff with relationships We heard many examples of admissions officers who had prior experience with  agents and took those relationships to a new institution. This path of talent acquisition  ‐‐ so common in the commercial world ‐‐ is  somewhat overlooked in our view. You can  shorten your learning and building cycle by  many years with an experienced admissions  officer bringing his/her relationships to the  right institution. The more you believe that  relationships are the key for agent  recruitment, the more attractive are  admissions and marketing staff with  extensive relationships.   Search the Internet There are plenty of agencies available. Australian universities are required by law to  list their agency relationships on their websites, as you can see from the example  below. If you need a list of Australian Universities we’ve provided a few valuable  links in the appendix to this e‐book.  Some of the US institutions, such as the  University of Cincinnati and SUNY do the same and publish their overseas  representatives. They provide you with a vetted list.    http://futurestudents.unimelb.edu.au/info/international     http://futurestudents.unimelb.edu.au/info/overseas‐representatives    (registration required) If you want a diverse population, look for smaller  agencies that can demonstrate that they find the right fit  of students and don’t make unrealistic promises about  your university.  ~ Colleen Grover, Director of  International Initiatives, Husson University 
  28. 28.     26  We have also seen LinkedIn groups frequently used as forums for additional agent  recommendations or requests for specific markets. 
  29. 29.     27  Post Information on Your Website Canadian universities have a much longer history of using agents than their American  counterparts. Within their websites there is often information for agents who are  interested in representing the institution or who already do so. Having a convenient  format to facilitate agent inquiries and applications will make your job easier. Wilfrid  Laurier University in Ontario, Canada, has a nice portal on its website for agents.  Source: https://www.wlu.ca/forms_detail.php?grp_id=1928&frm_id=2644
  30. 30.     28  Buy lists of agent brokers We have seen offers to buy lists of agents by  country or region. We don’t know the quality  and source of these lists, and we have not  heard of any schools using them. If you have  any experience, please give feedback on our  site www.inteadreviews.com.  Travel around the world If you are traveling, you’ll be able to find and  visit recruiters directly. Depending on your  university’s travel budget, you could meet  several recruiters at fairs in the US or choose  to travel to each country to select your agents.  In the big cities in China and India, you can find areas with lots of education  consultancies. This would certainly be more of a hit or miss approach. The  Commercial Service of the Department of Commerce can be a helpful independent  group arranging meetings for you with educational agents and other relevant entities.  We discuss this option in more detail section 6 of this e‐book. National associations of professional agents FELCA [LINK], the Federation of Education  and Language Consultant Associations, is  the international association of national  agency associations. Felca is the forum of  national language and education travel  associations from all over the world. Its  members include the national associations of  Brazil, Italy, Europe, France, Indonesia,  Japan, Korea, Russia, Spain, Taiwan,  Thailand, Turkey, and Vietnam. The  members of the national associations are  individual businesses whose role it is to  advise and counsel students who want to  travel overseas to study at a language school,  high school or university. Associations such  as, BELTA in Brazil, TIAC in Thailand, or  JAOS in Japan, are examples of associations  that can help you to identify agents in  various regions. In most cases, these agents  agree to abide by the ethical practice 
  31. 31.     29  guidelines of their respective organizations but in most cases (maybe all) there is no  enforcement mechanism other than AIRC (which we discuss below and in section 6 of  this e‐book).  Agent fairs ICEF and WEBA host the two largest conferences we have found. Agents and  admissions officers meet at these events, which are effectively trade fairs for student  recruitment; the tongue‐in‐cheek comparison would be to speed dating. At these  conferences, school admissions officers and  recruiting agents meet and discuss their  respective needs. The organizers emphasize  that they screen recruiters for quality. These  fairs represent an efficient way to meet  agents. There are a number of providers,  www.icef.com. For full disclosure, Intead has  a working relationship and sponsorship  activity with ICEF, which organizes these  agent workshops around the world.      For those just starting go to the ICEF website. Attend an  ICEF workshop. I can’t say enough good things about  ICEF and how they are an excellent conduit between  universities and agents.  ~ Christie Schellenberger,  Manager, International Recruitment & Admissions,  Wilfrid Laurier University 
  32. 32.     30      AIRC (American International Recruitment Council) In the United States, AIRC is a standard‐setting organization that qualifies and audits  commission‐based agents. According to John Deupree, Executive Director of AIRC,  the organization was founded to “safeguard the interests of students and institutions  through promotion of best practice strategies of international recruitment.” AIRC was  founded by US accredited institutions who believed that the industry would benefit  from having a certification process for agents that was modeled on US higher  education accreditation, with comparable rigor.   Other countries rely upon government regulation to assure institutional compliance.  But no other country has any mechanism that can sanction an agent. AIRC is capable  of doing that. Laws do not cross‐borders. Accreditation regimes do. In that respect,  AIRC is stricter and more rigorous as far as agents are concerned. As an institutional member, you can examine their membership list and receive a list  of approved agencies. AIRC is a relatively young organization and has a limited list of  audited agencies.   Again, for full disclosure, Intead has a working relationship and sponsorship activity  with AIRC.
  33. 33.     31  Who manages the largest agent networks? This publication focuses on agency agreements for college‐ and university‐level  education in the United States. In practice, many other levels of education use agent  networks very extensively.   In language schools around the world, agency recruiting is the predominant method of recruitment. The large language and education companies such as ELS,  StudyGroup, Navitas, and Kaplan have networks with hundreds of agency  agreements and thousands of recruiting agents. They maintain a professionally  managed operation, often with in‐country local representatives to support the  marketing activities, orientation of agents, and advice to parents and students. This  extensive pre‐existing network is one of the key assets small and large third‐party  English as a Second Language (ESL) providers bring to universities and colleges when  they partner. The second group of companies deeply involved in agency recruiting networks are  the pathway providers. Companies such as Navitas, INTO, Kaplan and StudyGroup  again manage these networks as one of their core competencies. You notice that  there is some overlap between the service providers as they offer language and  pathway programs as well as their own education programs to various degrees.  IDP is a joint venture between Australian universities and an online recruiting  company called SEEK. IDP was established by Australian universities in 1969 to  provide development assistance to universities in Asia. The organization started to  develop its global network of student placement offices in 1987 when Australia began  accepting full‐fee‐paying international students.  IDP also owns the English Language  Testing System (IELTS), the TOEFL competitor. IDP has a network of over eighty  offices.  Smaller but still sizable language school providers such as the Language Company  have built their own networks as well as country‐specific recruiting organizations  such as IEC in China.  We strongly believe that these scale recruiting networks, with their sophisticated  digital marketing operations, in‐country support teams, scaled back‐end software and  extensive distribution relationships will have a growing role in the increasingly  competitive international education market. 
  34. 34.     32  Who is looking for whom and is the tide turning? We have given you a solid list of ways to  identify appropriate agents, and we will  further analyze how to vet and build  relationships, but we want to share one  observation from our research. Many  admissions staff members mentioned that  they get inundated with requests to sign  agent agreements. Some do not respond at  all, others respond selectively and  opportunistically as time permits, and only a few sign a large number of agreements.  The latter would have the motto: Let the agent prove him/herself. Results will be the  best way of selection.   We’d like to emphasize the following: Experienced, successful agencies around the  world have become selective themselves. They are selective in their approach to  appropriate partnerships. These agents already have plenty of students to choose  from; they want to partner with attractive schools with the right support team, and  favorable terms. We have heard of agents actively canceling agreements if they cannot  deliver students to a particular type of school or when it is not worth their staff’s time  to seek students. In reality, most of these agreements will just expire without any  communication. But schools need to understand that they have to work hard to be  represented by the strongest, most successful agents.   We do feel that some admissions officers are underestimating the need to select the  right agents for their types of programs and schools. Further, it will take time to build  a relationship. Unless you are a highly attractive school in terms of ranking, location  and other attributes, let’s be honest, you will be one of many schools from the US,  Canada, Australia, UK and many other international markets vying for the attention  of prospective students. On a side note, if you think that agents have a choice of  schools, just think of the demands of being the counselor at an international school. The Coincidental Connection Our respondents also mentioned a number of times a local or coincidental connection  to the right Chinese or Indian business person who helps solve some of the  university’s recruitment challenges. Particularly in smaller regional institutions, we all  understand the critical dynamic between local trustees and the community. Yet many  of these arrangements do not lead to long‐term success. Most often, with these  informal connections, the recruitment partner in the targeted enrollment market is not  equipped, nor is the university ready, to lend support without an integral strategy and  execution plan.  Both agent and college should be made to feel that the  other is their most important agent or college, number  one.  ~ David Arredondo, Director, International  Student Services, Lorain County Community  College 
  35. 35.     33  Agent Qualities and Qualifications As with all other professional relationships, you need to feel comfortable with the  individuals and the companies you hire. They will represent your institution. In  developing an agency relationship, you’ll be  concerned with:  Honesty   Expertise   Dedication    Experience  What about scale? It depends on who you  are and what you are looking for. As we mentioned, agencies have become very  discerning in their selection of schools as well. You have to remember that it’s easy to sign an agreement. The start‐up cost is  minimal. The real work starts with the agents learning about and representing your  programs.  You need to feel that your school profile fits  into the activities of the agency. It might  sound great if a large‐scale agency (many  branch offices with many counselors and  prospective students) signs on, but not if  they lack the ability to effectively market  your institution.  If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  We have seen and heard of many cases where agencies focus on the more highly  branded universities and locations and agreements with lower ranked, lesser known  schools result in little, if any, activity. The Cincinnati Principles—Guidelines for Success in Recruiting The Cincinnati Principles were published by Mitch Leventhal, PhD, the pioneer of and  a strong advocate for agency‐based recruiting in the United States. Mitch is now Vice  Chancellor for Global Affairs for The State University of New York System.  The Cincinnati Principles were created as an ad hoc guide; they were ultimately  superseded by AIRC. They were created because there were no US standards in  Each market has its own niche. You have to be thinking  multi‐faceted with your arrangements. You have to be  flexible, the environment is constantly changing. And  you have to build long‐term relationships.    ~ Jay Lokken, Director of International Education  Program, University of Wisconsin LaCrosse  Have clarity of purpose in terms of regions, number  and quality of students, find a champion of  international recruitment on campus, and provide  fast turnaround. ~ John C. Wood, Chief Executive  Officer, University Programs, Navitas 
  36. 36.     34  existence to guide institutions in their work with agents. So, the idea was to inform US  institutions that they would be well served  to follow the standards that exist in  Australia. This was a stop‐gap approach  until the development of domestic  standards for the US market.   According to Mitch Leventhal, “In late  2005, the University of Cincinnati began its  journey toward commission‐based  recruitment. UC’s first agent agreements were signed in January 2006, and success in  the first two years is very apparent. In the course of the work, UC has developed 10  principles which are not written in stone, but which guide all agent‐related actions,  and against which assumptions are tested.”   If your institution is serious about changing course, consider these principles as you  plan your new international recruitment strategy.  1.  Work with well‐established commission‐based agents who already work with  the Australian universities.  2.  Refuse to work with agents who exclusively charge students.  3.  Always check the references of agencies under consideration.  4.  Demand that agents operate as though the ESOS Act applies to your US  institution. (See our discussion of ESOS in section 7 of this e-book).  5.  Embrace best practices that are already in place, and do not re‐invent the  wheel.  6.  Utilize the Australian agency agreement with as few modifications as possible.  7.  Work within the established operating framework with which agencies are  familiar and comfortable; adapt your admissions and marketing practices to  the new reality.  8.  Establish a dedicated international admissions office to coordinate agency  relationships and support their efforts.  9.  Do not appoint more than three agents in any given country, and avoid  appointing fewer than two.  10.  Collaborate with your local competitors—embrace co‐opetition—the result  will be economies of scale in an expanding market with accelerated benefits  for all.  There is a difference between being well represented  versus being well promoted.  ~ Greet Provost, Director, Office of International  Programs, University of Mississippi 
  37. 37.     35  We will talk in greater detail in section 7 about the situation in Australia. But we  should point out that the US market is a follower and not a fast one at that. The  Australian entities have been working on a Code of Practice for international  recruitment, including agent use for many years. In contrast to the incredibly diverse  and varied response and  application process in the  US, there is great cohesion  and consensus in the  Australian market.  http://sydney.edu.au/documents/future_students/CodeOfPractice.pdf
  38. 38.     36  5. Onboarding, Training and Communication Experienced agents and university recruiters stress the importance of onboarding and  the continuous communication flow. Many agencies represent a significant number of  programs. The counselors need to be familiar with your programs, standards and the  type of student that will succeed and fit in at your institution. Unfortunately, high staff turnover among counselors seems to plague agencies around the world. We  could not find any quantifiable data, but anecdotal evidence is very strong. It appears  that small agencies, managed by the owners, are less affected by turnover but these  agencies offer, by definition, less recruitment scale and smaller marketing reach. Developing a manual for agents will ultimately save you a great deal of time. A one‐ time investment up front, this manual should be easily updatable so that agents  throughout the world can access the information you want to convey and  understand the system you want to use for ongoing agent communication and  management. Agents can find it overwhelming to be  inundated with emails from your  institution. While it might seem useful to  send emails every time a new program  is announced or whenever there is  exciting news, the effect is quickly lost  when agents stop reading the emails.   Better to develop a newsletter of sorts or some other regular communication channel  so that your agents will be able to keep up with exciting news from your institution  without feeling bombarded. You want to establish a communication protocol such as  being available weekly, or monthly, for a Skype conversation. You want to agree on a  time frame for responding to information requests, to get away from the immediacy  and fire drills.   George Burke advises “Remember that they are often sales people; they want  immediate response.” You need to control the information flow. We suggest that you  look at speed and quick customer service to your representative network as a  necessity for remaining competitive. You need to develop your processes and manage  information in a way that allows you to respond. Otherwise others will, and you will  lose the prospective student.   If you don’t have a manual, you need to create one.  Agents can send you pages of questions. ~ Charles  Wilkerson, Director of International Education &  Recruitment, Tennessee Tech University 
  39. 39.     37  Link to ICEF/IDP Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/24973225 
  40. 40.     38  Signing the Contractual Agreement At the outset both parties, the institution and the agency, must agree to certain terms  of engagement. An agreement must be reached that includes:  compensation structure  a marketing plan   training   marketing materials The compensation structure will be a  critical discussion at the beginning of the  relationship. How agents receive  compensation is truly the crux of the great agent debate. Some agents/counselors  receive compensation exclusively from the student/parents while others seek  additional compensation from the institution for placing the student. You will need to  determine, along with your administration and colleagues, how you want to approach  agent compensation.   We have heard the term “double dipping” frequently which refers to agents receiving  a payment from the parents and the school. Transparency seems to be the best way  to manage this part of the relationship.  We find the term “double dipping” pejorative at the outset, as if there is something  inappropriate going on. Industry relationships in a wide range of industries have been  built on vendors selling their services to a range of customers. Take advertising for  instance. When a business (including universities) place ads through their ad agency,  the agency gets paid for the creative work  and then typically takes 15 percent of the  ad placement cost as a fee just for placing  the ad in the chosen medium (TV,  newsprint, online, etc.).  Consider the international education  agent who spends time helping a family  with their application process, taking the  student to the relevant embassies to acquire visas, etc. That they receive payment from  the family seems appropriate for these services. That the agency then receives a fee for  placing the student in a particular university also seems appropriate. There is nothing  out of line or inappropriate in these transactions.   Create structure around training—by region, have  people who speak the local languages. The local  counselor’s English is not that good.  Have team  members who speak the local language. ~ Angel  Ahmed, Director of International Business  Development, Full Sail University  Agents should be encouraged to visit your campus, at  least once, if not regularly. In turn, college staff must try  to visit the agent’s offices while traveling abroad.   ~ David Arredondo, Director International Student  Services, Lorain County Community College 
  41. 41.     39  We must emphasize that it is critically important to building trust that the entire  agency fee structure be transparent to everyone involved (family and institution) with  no unexpected fees tacked on later in the process once everyone is feeling committed  to the process and reversing course would be painful.  For those who are brand new to agency  contracts, it would be useful to speak with  experienced colleagues to understand the  appropriate terms of engagement and  determine how agency and institution  might meet each other’s needs and interests  in the most satisfactory way.  Follow up Agents mentioned frequently that getting quick responses to questions is critical for  them. They need to be responsive to their clients (students and their families), which  means that you need to be responsive to them. The better your working relationship,  the more motivated the agents will be to present your school. This raises an important  point: don’t take on more agents than you can manage. Better to work closely with a  few well‐trained agents than to cast a wide net without the ability to effectively engage  your agents. This is another example of depth being better than breadth.  Your admissions officers have an in‐depth knowledge of your campus. They also have  access to the network of in‐house contacts and experts on all facets of your school.  Agents do not have that context. So you  need to provide as much context as  possible. If you have worked with busy  high school counselors in the US, you  know that they can have hundreds of  students to support. The counselors  (whether high school counselors in the US  or agents abroad) need to get to know the  students and the schools. It’s a challenge.  You have the ability to make it easier for  your agents. And those agents will be  more successful for you when you are a strong, responsive partner. Agent visit programs One of the best ways to strengthen your professional relationship with your agent  network is to invite your agents to visit campus. Think how useful it is to have high  While liberal arts has found some fashion around the  globe, we find we have to explain our most popular  major, business management, to international  counselors because of its liberal arts foundation. Some  agents and international students get stuck on this.   ~ Tony Littlefield, Senior Associate Director of  Admission, Washington College  The commission model allows the institution to be in  charge of the process. ~ John Deupree, Executive  Director, AIRC 
  42. 42.     40  school counselors visit campus to learn, feel, experience and understand your  institution. For your agent network this can be just as useful. Successful agents want to  understand the ins and outs of the colleges they represent. A visit to campus is the best  way to share your unique strengths and attributes.   Piggybacking off of other scheduled programs and events can be incredibly  successful. When agents visit for the North American ICEF Workshops or for the  annual AIRC Conference, you are presented with a terrific opportunity to invite your  agents to extend their visits by traveling to your campus.   ICEF FAM tours Agent familiarization (FAM) tours and  receptions are excellent ways for you to  gain exposure and promote your  institution and/or association with  workshop‐registered agents. FAM tours allow you to take advantage  of the large number of agents attending  the workshop and attract them to visit  your institution, campus and region. Effective FAM tours highlight a region and its  various education options (universities, colleges, secondary schools, and language  schools), enabling agents to increase their product knowledge and bring back  firsthand information to potential students.  Agent management tools A range of software tools are available to help  institutions manage their agent network and  communicate efficiently with this group as well  as track the results of their work.    Agints.com: offers an online tool to manage your agent networks.   Oscar (Internal System for IDP clients)  (http://www.idp.com/pdf/IDP_Services.pdf)    STOURY: Intead’s tablet presentation tool and  content management system to manage a global  agent network.   See:  http://info.intead.com/stoury  Parents are the foundation in Asia. The agent needs to be  able to say the city is safe, talk about the services on campus  such as your health center, housing, food services – all the  support services for international students. ~ Jay Lokken,  Director of International Education Program,  University of Wisconsin LaCrosse  You have to be able to manage your agents if youʹre  going to do this right. ~ John Deupree, Executive  Director, AIRC 
  43. 43.     41  Business plan Appropriate relationship management requires setting expectations and benchmarks  on both sides, the agent and the school. Both will have to agree to deliverables and  performance. This is not a one‐way street. Agents have to agree to a realistic number  of applicants and enrolled students. Don’t expect miracles and be realistic about the  time frame, type of school and the market.  Agents will expect support in terms of marketing and information. The quick  response to questions is one of the most  frequently cited requests. Fast decisions by  the school are another critical element,  which can be particularly challenging for  US universities which often have strict  deadlines and application processes  without much flexibility.  The business plan is your basis for regular  evaluation and ultimately contract  renewal.  We don’t want to ignore compensation  and payment, but it is only one element of  your successful business plan.  Not every agent relationship will warrant  the same planning, but the key agency  relationships will require care and  attention.   Promoting agent activities on your university website Within your institution’s website you can create a login‐only microsite so agents can  easily find useful information, including your agent manual and other helpful  updates, deadlines and information. This has been especially popular in the UK and  Australia. Australian and British universities have a longer tradition of using  commission‐based agencies as extensions of their marketing functions. They list  appointed agents on their websites and direct students to their offices.  The University of Sydney’s website allows prospective students to connect with  approved agents in their home countries. This university also has an agent portal,  providing documents to help manage the relationship with agents.  A word of caution. Even with quality agents, it takes a  lot more time to manage an agent network than you  think. ~ Ron Cushing, Director of International  Services, University of Cincinnati  “We have somebody on the ground ‐ 6 weeks in the  spring, 6 weeks in the fall. He meets with all agents,  training them. We add new agents in the second or  third tier cities [in China]. Beijing and Shanghai are  working with numerous schools and are usually  looking to send their students to the highest ranked  schools. ~ Penny Gerdeman, Director of  International Admissions and Services,  University of Findlay 
  44. 44.     42  While we are on the topic of promoting your programs via  your website, you may want to consider how your website  appears to students and agents when viewed through that  country’s ISPs (internet service providers). That your  website works well when you check it through your  Comcast, Verizon or other US‐based ISP does not mean it  will appear the same way when viewed from overseas. For  instance, China blocks YouTube, Facebook, Google and  other standard social media tools we take for granted here  in the US.   Intead offers a digital audit and audit report complete with  screen shots and recommendations for improving your  website’s presentation in other countries. With so many  students and agencies conducting their research online and  sharing information about school options, it can be invaluable to see yourself through  their digital eyes.  For more information see: Intead Digital Audit. Contract renewal Relationships take time to develop. The  agent‐institution relationship is like any  other both sides require investment. In fact,  in our research for this e‐book and our work  in the field, we learned that the agencies may  actually have to invest more time and energy  than the institutions do.  We have heard from experienced admissions officers that three years seems to be an  important threshold. If you are unsuccessful in enrolling students through an agency  after three years, the relationship may not be worthwhile.   Time zones are a big challenge. ~ Georgina Herrera  Moreno, International Relationship Manager,  Bridge Linguatec 
  45. 45.     43    The Agent Management Process Source: A Best Practice Guide for Agent Management, Department of Education, Training and Employment Queensland  Government, Australia 
  46. 46.     44  6. Support Organizations Department of Commerce Commercial Service The Department of Commerce’s (DOC) Commercial Service appears to be  underutilized by colleges and universities. We call it the best‐kept secret in  international recruitment. Many other US industries use the DOC service as a “door  opener” and on‐the‐ground support organization around the world. In contrast to  EducationUSA, the Commercial Service specializes in servicing and promoting  individual companies and institutions directly.   The Department of Commerce “Gold Key Service” is a cost‐efficient paid service,  providing support when making your local country arrangements, including meeting  with potential partner schools and recruitment agents. DOC considers recruitment  agents a legitimate marketing channel for universities. The Commerce Department is  even able to arrange local receptions, and the invitation will come from the US  embassy or consulate, elevating your local standing immediately.  We also strongly recommend DOC research reports that provide information on local  education markets. The Commercial Service organizes country missions, which create  inroads and facilitate contacts.  For more information, see: http://export.gov/salesandmarketing/eg_main_018195.asp  NAFSA NAFSA is the Association of International Educators. There are 10,000 members  worldwide who work in every area related to international education. NAFSA is a  tremendous resource for introductory training, ongoing learning, best practice  exchanges, collegial conversations and relationship building. NAFSA hosts an annual  conference yearly as well as smaller regional conferences. Through NAFSA you can  find institutional members who use agents as part of their recruitment strategies. For more information, see: http://www.nafsa.org/  AIRC As mentioned previously AIRC is the American International Recruitment Council.  For those institutions who are just beginning to consider working with agents, AIRC  can be a worthwhile starting point. AIRC provides a venue for discussion and  learning. It seems to us that AIRC exemplifies the US approach to have a self‐ regulatory membership organization providing ethical standards for universities and  agents. If the AIRC rules are implemented by a large number of universities, it will 
  47. 47.     45  help to create a transparent and more professionally managed process by universities  and agencies. This may help to avoid consumer and student complaints, which led to  government regulation in Australia. The latter we will discuss in the next section in  greater detail.   For more information, see: http://airc‐education.org/ 
  48. 48.     46  7. International Comparison The Australian Experience Australian universities, and to a similar extent British and Canadian universities, have  been active users of the agent recruitment channels for decades. International students  account for a much larger part of the  Australian student body, roughly 25%  vs. 3 % in the US. So universities have  had, and continue to have, a much  greater need to scale their international  enrollment operations.  Australian universities have a long‐ standing, deep internationalization component as part of their institutional DNA.  During the past twenty to thirty years, the Australian universities as a whole, and the  government, have gone through an extensive learning process about international  recruitment. The Australian government has been a strong supporter and has  established a strong regulatory framework that guides and binds the institutions and  protects international students. The regulatory framework includes the use of agents.  (Australian Government Information on ESOS).   We learned from the Australian universities that you don’t  want to be overrepresented; identify and develop strong  relationships with key partners. ~ Steven Boyd, Director  International Admissions, University of Bridgeport  ** Includes EU and Non‐EU citizens   Sources: IIE, Project Atlas OECD, Wikipedia, HESA  
  49. 49.     47  The Australian government introduced a rating system connected with visa issuance  that sanctions institutions. Australian universities are not allowed to recruit or issue  visas, similar to the prohibition on issuing I‐20s in the United States. Education has become the third largest export for the Australian economy.  Universities have developed a pragmatic and commercial attitude towards managing  and scaling international student enrollment while developing a strong institutional  and academic support infrastructure.    Pathway programs have probably further increased the market size by becoming an  entry point for a broader group of international students. The programs prepare  students culturally, linguistically and academically to transition to Australian higher  education institutions. We would contrast that with the US approach of picking the  best and brightest from around the world—students the US Ivy League institutions  (and beyond) would attract.  Australian universities have had a much stronger outward‐looking perspective, than  their American counterparts. This international perspective was driven by the need of  a large country with a small population to attract talent from abroad and expose its  own students to a broad international population. The university system was  considered the means to attract and develop talent. The Australian visa system itself is  driven by a plan to attract specific skilled individuals and award points to those with  skills in higher demand. If the country needs nurses, students interested in nursing  and credentialed nurses will get preferential visa treatment. The same holds for  accountants and other professions. Traveling around Australia and meeting with Australian university officials reminded  me of German export‐oriented companies. They are low‐key, efficient, focused on  their task and quite self‐confident. And they are successful. Though incredibly  friendly, the Australian universities were not about to spill the beans on how and why  they are successful. While they retained their specific commercial “secrets,” they  shared their sophisticated thinking about university internationalization and the  associated processes. First let’s compare the United States and Australia. Australia has a population of about  23 million and the US more than 300 million. Australia has 800,000 domestic students  and about 200,000 international students whereas the US has over 20 million domestic  students and approximately 750,000 international students.  The Australian university “system” includes fewer than 40 institutions and its size is  quite manageable compared to our incredibly large US group of more than 4,000 two‐ 
  50. 50.     48  and four‐year colleges and universities. All 40 Australian universities have a large  percentage of international students ranging from 15 to 45 percent of total enrollment.  Internationalization is broader than enrollment Few Australian academic leaders look at student enrollment as the sole means of  enacting internationalization. Stacey Farraway, Regional Manager for Europe and  Americas at The Queensland University of Technology, started our discussion by  highlighting a broad framework that looks at all aspects of internationalization of the  university on multiple levels:    Student services for international students,    Industry relationships,    Alumni, and    Enrollment marketing.   Comprehensive internationalization, a phrase that is frequently tossed around in  academic circles, is achieved in the Australian universities. Even with the focus on  comprehensive internationalization, international student enrollment is treated as a  key revenue driver.  From our conversations, we learned that US institutions seem to be in the earlier  stages of institutional development of broad‐based internationalization plans. It’s  certainly part of our industry ethos that all professionals focus appropriate support on  international students’ success and well‐being. The Australian university perspectives  appeared, at least anecdotally, to be more well‐rounded and to have wider  institutional support, than their US counterparts. Commission-based recruitment is part of the recruitment DNA In stark contrast to the US, the agency recruitment channel is a mainstream recruiting  method deployed by all Australian universities. The agent recruiting channel did not  elicit any defensiveness by Australian university officials; the management of agents  seemed a natural part of their work. As specified within the government regulatory  framework, universities must document the agents representing their institutions. As  a matter of fact, one of the largest commission‐based recruiting companies in the  world, IDP, is owned partially by Australian universities themselves. The Australian universities appear to have developed processes to build and manage  recruiting networks that are rare in the United States. Due diligence processes are  similar on paper but there is a deeper pool of knowledge. Most universities have an  extensive network with several hundred agents, or even more when branch offices are 

×