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Planning, managing PR campaigns, PRecious Communications

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Planning and Managing
Successful PR Campaigns
@larsv
We are a boutique agency made up of highly adaptive,
responsive and self empowered people. Each of our team
members have a...
What we do
Summarise
and
present the
outcome
Execute
required
ideas
Propose
relevant
ideas
Understand
a partner’s
PR needs...

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Planning, managing PR campaigns, PRecious Communications

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This powerful program will further enhance your skills on designing, planning, analyzing and effectively utilizing the full range of PR media and channels. When devising strategic plans for campaigns the basic is to have a road map, to identify objectives and strategies, to plan and to execute. This program will delve into how to achieve key objectives, to communicate key messages, to target the right media channel to the intended audience, to identify the perfect face to communicate the messages, to utilize resources and mostly importantly how to evaluate the success of the campaign.

1) Understanding Public Relations
2) Objectives and Stakeholders
3) Generating Your Ideas
4) Getting Your Story Out
5) Managing Your brand through PR
6) Traditional Media
7) Communications Trends
8) Press Conferences
9) PR Measurement
10) Crisis Management

This powerful program will further enhance your skills on designing, planning, analyzing and effectively utilizing the full range of PR media and channels. When devising strategic plans for campaigns the basic is to have a road map, to identify objectives and strategies, to plan and to execute. This program will delve into how to achieve key objectives, to communicate key messages, to target the right media channel to the intended audience, to identify the perfect face to communicate the messages, to utilize resources and mostly importantly how to evaluate the success of the campaign.

1) Understanding Public Relations
2) Objectives and Stakeholders
3) Generating Your Ideas
4) Getting Your Story Out
5) Managing Your brand through PR
6) Traditional Media
7) Communications Trends
8) Press Conferences
9) PR Measurement
10) Crisis Management

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Planning, managing PR campaigns, PRecious Communications

  1. 1. Planning and Managing Successful PR Campaigns @larsv
  2. 2. We are a boutique agency made up of highly adaptive, responsive and self empowered people. Each of our team members have a strong background knowledge in a specific industry on top of public relations experience. As a team, we aim to provide our clients the best working experience through active listening and understanding of needs. © PRecious Communications 2015 2 About Us
  3. 3. What we do Summarise and present the outcome Execute required ideas Propose relevant ideas Understand a partner’s PR needs © PRecious Communications 2015 3 Social media Press releases Events Interviews Newsletters Integrated Marketing Comms
  4. 4. Partners we have worked with © PRecious Communications 2015 4
  5. 5. © PRecious Communications 2015 5 The PRecious Team
  6. 6. A Short Introduction March 31, © PRecious Communications 2015 6 • International communication and social media expert, with over 15 years of industry experience in public relations and corporate affairs for global and regional heavyweights as well as local brands in B2B and B2C with a focus on technology. • As former Executive Director at global agency Hill+Knowlton, I am heavily experienced in growing, managing, and leading global brands’ reputation across industry sectors in traditional and digital media environments. • Worked with global tech brands such as AT&T, Huawei, McAfee, Tata Communications, VMware and other leading technology brands.
  7. 7. © PRecious Communications 2015 Discussion in small groups What is the biggest PR related challenge you face today? Welcome! 7
  8. 8. Day 1 1) Understanding Public Relations 2) Objectives and Stakeholders 3) Generating Your Ideas 4) Getting Your Story Out 5) Managing Your brand through PR Day 2 6) Traditional Media 7) Communications Trends 8) Press Conferences 9) PR Measurement 10) Crisis Management © PRecious Communications 2015 8 Our Programme March 31,
  9. 9. © PRecious Communications 2015 9 Session 1: Understanding Public Relations • Why and when companies need public relations • The scope and role of public relations in an organization • The art of reputation management • Branding & PR
  10. 10. © PRecious Communications 2015 What are some brands that inspire you—and why? What is branding?
  11. 11. © PRecious Communications 2015 1 in 4 million What is branding?
  12. 12. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding?
  13. 13. © PRecious Communications 2015 1 + 1 = 2.5 What is branding?
  14. 14. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding?
  15. 15. © PRecious Communications 2015 20 vs 5 What is branding?
  16. 16. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding?
  17. 17. © PRecious Communications 2015 911 What is branding?
  18. 18. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding?
  19. 19. © PRecious Communications 2015 2,000 What is branding?
  20. 20. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding?
  21. 21. © PRecious Communications 2015 4,000 What is branding?
  22. 22. © PRecious Communications 2015 700,000 What is branding?
  23. 23. © PRecious Communications 2015
  24. 24. © PRecious Communications 2015 6,000,000,000 What is branding?
  25. 25. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding?
  26. 26. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding? 20,000,000,00 0
  27. 27. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is branding?
  28. 28. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is Reputation? The beliefs or opinions that are held about someone or something by the community or general public = perception [rep-yuh-tey-shuhn] 28
  29. 29. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is Reputation? “A brand is owned by the company, while reputation is owned by stakeholders”- Reputation Institute 29
  30. 30. © PRecious Communications 2015 Reputation & Brand When it comes to telling a brand’s story, what do you think are the main challenges? 30
  31. 31. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public Relations So… what is public relations? 31
  32. 32. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public RelationsAdvertising Brand Reputation “I HEARD HE IS A GREAT LOVER.” [Adopted from “The difference between marketing, pr, advertising & branding”] 32
  33. 33. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public relations The long and the short of public relations: Building or maintaining an organization’s relations with its various stakeholders (groups of people who are important to it) 33
  34. 34. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public Relations Remember: Most times, PR works indirectly… Where does PR sit in an organization? 34
  35. 35. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public Relations Why PR? • Two- way communication. • More cost effective as compared to other forms of communication. • Perception of an impartial opinion and reviewed in the media. • Essential tool in business growth. • Reputation and credibility as important as product and support. • Messaging helps to position the company/brand/products, conveying its key attributes and value proposition. 35
  36. 36. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public Relations Important! Your message to your target audiences 36
  37. 37. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public Relations So… what is a public relations campaign? 37
  38. 38. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public Relations Campaigns are… like projects: • Contributing to the organization’s overall objectives • Aimed at achieving specific goals • Defined budget and time frame • Coordinated and intentional 38
  39. 39. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public Relations Do remember any specific public relations campaigns that impressed you? 39
  40. 40. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 1? Understanding Public Relations Why and when companies need public relations The scope and role of public relations in an organization The art of reputation management Branding & PR © PRecious Communications 2015 40
  41. 41. © PRecious Communications 2015 41 Session 2: Objectives and Stakeholders • Aligning a public relations strategy with business objectives • Translating objectives into targeted outcomes • Identifying your audience • Applying creativity to messaging • Establishing credibility through third party endorsement
  42. 42. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Too many communicators work very hard on tactics… …that DON’T support corporate goals! 42
  43. 43. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper 43
  44. 44. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • Make business GOALS your communications goals, then develop STRATEGIES: 44
  45. 45. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • Conduct a gap analysis to understand your benchmarks and to decide what are your priorities • Choose metrics to measure the results 45
  46. 46. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • You can’t manage what you don’t measure • What impact do your programs have – what are the results? 46
  47. 47. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • Example: Bicycle Manufacturer 47
  48. 48. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • Example: Bicycle Manufacturer 48
  49. 49. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • Example: Bicycle Manufacturer 49
  50. 50. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • Example: Bicycle Manufacturer
  51. 51. © PRecious Communications 2015 Aligning PR Strategy and Objectives Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiva Whitepaper • Example: Bicycle Manufacturer Now it’s your turn for a campaign: 1) Pick one of these 3 strategies – and form groups 2) Work out a brief campaign What you should cover: • Theme • Audience • Media • Tactics You got 20 minutes
  52. 52. © PRecious Communications 2015 Stakeholder Mapping Stakeholders Resellers and providers Regulators CEOs and CTOs Government Potential customers Media Customers • Webinar • Media • Blog • Speaking engagement • Media • Round tables • LinkedIn • Media • Round tables • Workshops • Gatherings • Media • Round tables • Blog • Media • Webinar • Conferences • LinkedIn • Community (website) • Content advertising • SEO • Social media • Speaking engagement • Blog • LinkedIn • Twitter • Facebook • Media • Blog • Community (website) • Speaking engagement • Webinar 52
  53. 53. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public RelationsAdvertising Brand Reputation “I HEARD HE IS A GREAT LOVER.” [Adopted from “The difference between marketing, pr, advertising & branding”] 53 Now it’s your turn: • Think about your own organization • Who could be impactful 3rd party endorsers You have 5 minutes, then we will share.
  54. 54. © PRecious Communications 2015 Endorsements Stakeholders Resellers and providers Regulators CEOs and CTOs Government Potential customers Media Customers • Webinar • Media • Blog • Speaking engagement • Media • Round tables • LinkedIn • Media • Round tables • Workshops • Gatherings • Media • Round tables • Blog • Media • Webinar • Conferences • LinkedIn • Community (website) • Content advertising • SEO • Social media • Speaking engagement • Blog • LinkedIn • Twitter • Facebook • Media • Blog • Community (website) • Speaking engagement • Webinar 54
  55. 55. Growing Evernote in South East Asia In November 2012, PRecious Communications managed Evernote’s Smart Notebook launch in Singapore and Malaysia Campaigns Objectives • To launch Evernote brand • build brand awareness in South East Asia Market Action • Built an integrated outreach programme focusing on the idea of digital ‘marrying’ analog note taking • Invite digital influencerrs Results • Coverage on CNBC, Computer World, CIO-Asia, CNet, ThumbsUp © PRecious Communications 2015 55 Case Study: Cloud Service
  56. 56. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 2? Objectives and Stakeholders Aligning a public relations strategy with business objectives Translating objectives into targeted outcomes Identifying your audience Applying creativity to messaging Establishing credibility through third party endorsement © PRecious Communications 2015 56
  57. 57. © PRecious Communications 2015 57 Session 3: Generating Your Ideas • Thinking out of the box to get noticed • Generating attention grabbing ideas • Scale your competition • Raising the credibility of your story • Ensuring your story is pertinent to the publication • Your target audience – Who and Where
  58. 58. © PRecious Communications 2015 A history of PR campaigns Example: Bacon ‘n’ Eggs • Survey of more than 5,000 doctors in the early 1920s - convince Americans that a hearty protein-rich meal was recommended first thing in the morning • From 1919 until 2011, egg production has skyrocketed from 1.6 billion to an Egg McMuffin- worthy 6.5 billion. Source: PR Web / PR Daily – [Infographic] Top PR Campaigns - History
  59. 59. © PRecious Communications 2015 Content Strategy and Creation Why should people listen? • Connects people, gets people engaged and interested • Brings real personality to what it is you do • Brings your business alive Why How What Adapted from: Golden Circles by Simon Sinek Everybody knows what your organization does Most organizations know their USPs, value proposition Very little organizations know their core beliefs— what drives your organization?
  60. 60. © PRecious Communications 2015 Content Strategy and Creation Important! Your message to your target audience Your… products, offers, service, people Industry… trends, news, data, advice E.g. Technology, legislation, competition 60
  61. 61. • Why should you identify key differentiators? – Defines your position in the market/industry among competitors – Also referred to as Unique Selling Proposition (USP) • It should be unique, measurable and defendable • Answers the question of “Why should I purchase the product/service from you versus other similar alternatives?” Your Key Differentiators
  62. 62. For whom? What is YOUR USP?
  63. 63. © PRecious Communications 2015 Knowing Your Audience Who • (Potential) customers • Suppliers • Advertisers • Media • Financial bodies • Regulatory and government bodies • Industry groups and other networks What • Age • Gender • Occupation or qualification • Geography • Socio-economic group • Family structure • Lifestyle How • Choice of words • Use of jargons and technical terms • Tone • Focus • The design and feel of the communication • The medium used 63
  64. 64. © PRecious Communications 2015 Knowing Your Audience • Bios on their social networks. • Deeper look into the things that they value most highly about themselves. How Do They Describe Themselves? • Best time to post. When Are They Most Socially Active? • For example, rapper 50 Cent, tweeted about a company he’d invested in. His series of tweets bumped up the value of the company he promoted by 240%. Whom Do They Listen To? • Learn about their interests, dig deeper into the kind of content they want by the networks they favour. What Content Do They Want? 64
  65. 65. © PRecious Communications 2015 PR Campaign Planning 65 Steps What it is about Remarks / sources Business Goal Summary of the challenge(s) you’re addressing How does it relate to your business objectives Communications Objectives What do you want to achieve and how to measure What exactly do you want to do and why Strategies & Key Message(s) Methods you choose to convey your story What’s your overall story Target Audiences The types of people you want to reach out to e.g. customers, regulators Tactics & Ideas How you want to bring your message across Brainstorming, research Channels (Media) Specific publications / programs / channels By demographics or geography Execution Details Timelines, resources 65
  66. 66. © PRecious Communications 2015 PR Campaign Planning 66 Steps What it is about Remarks / sources Business Goal Summary of the challenge(s) you’re addressing How does it relate to your business objectives Communications Objectives What do you want to achieve and how to measure What exactly do you want to do and why Strategies & Key Message(s) Methods you choose to convey your story What’s your overall story Target Audiences The types of people you want to reach out to e.g. customers, regulators Tactics & Ideas How you want to bring your message across Brainstorming, research Channels (Media) Specific publications / programs / channels By demographics or geography Execution Details Timelines, resources 66 What are typical business goals?
  67. 67. • Business Goal: – Sell more Palm Centro phones • Communications Objectives: – Introduce lifestyle & non-tech media influencers – Attract fashion phone upgraders – Encourage Palm handheld users to change to a smartphone • Measurement Metrics: – Outputs: • Number of articles • Audience reach – Outtakes: • How favourable is the device viewed by the media • Is the coverage on message – Outcomes: Number of phones sold • Result: – Close to 80 articles; most positive (rest neutral); nearly all on message Case Study: Electronics Palm Centro Launch 67
  68. 68. 68 • Business Goal: – Sell more Palm Centro phones • Communications Objectives: – Introduce lifestyle & non-tech media influencers – Attract fashion phone upgraders – Encourage Palm handheld users to change to a smartphone • Measurement Metrics: – Outputs: • Number of articles • Audience reach – Outtakes: • How favourable is the device viewed by the media • Is the coverage on message – Outcomes: Number of phones sold • Result: – Close to 80 articles; most positive (rest neutral); nearly all on message Case Study: Electronics Palm Centro LaunchKey Message A Key Message B Key Message C It’s time for a smart decision Easy-to-use – not just ‘another’ computer Increasing personal productivity on the go Choosing the Centro is the ultimate smart decision for fashion phone upgraders who want both style & smart phone functionalities Through it’s intuitive user interface and the combination of touch screen and keyboard, the Centro is the ideal partner for young, energetic and sociable users who want a smart phone to organize their lives and relationships on the go Messaging, email, built-in capabilities to view & edit documents and access to over 20,000 applications, makes the Centro THE customizable mobile companion for dynamic junior- to mid-level professionals to help them managing their busy work and social live Tone Analysis No. of Positives No. of Neutrals No. of Negatives On-Message Analysis 23 3 No. On Message No. Not On Message
  69. 69. © PRecious Communications 2015 Exercise: PR Campaign 69 Steps Details Business Goal Leverage the hosting of the Southeast Asia games in Singapore to drive visitor numbers and top events hosted Communications Objectives Position Singapore as global sports hub and garden city to attract visitors and interest global events Strategies & Key Message(s) Target Audiences Tactics & Ideas Channels (Media) Execution Details 1) Form 3 teams 2) Develop 2-3 Strategies You have 15 minutes
  70. 70. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 3? Generating your ideas Thinking out of the box to get noticed Generating attention grabbing ideas Scale your competition Raising the credibility of your story Ensuring your story is pertinent to the publication Your target audience – Who and Where © PRecious Communications 2015 70
  71. 71. © PRecious Communications 2015 71 Session 4: Getting your story out there — How to get noticed • PR and storytelling • How to tell a story • Formats of storytelling • How to pitch your story to the journalists • Why me why now?
  72. 72. © PRecious Communications 2015 Storytelling Why do we “storytell” in PR? • Storytelling works because it stimulates more areas of the brain than simply listing facts. • Research tells us that when we listen to a story, our brain experiences it first-hand. • Storytelling allows us to connect with our audience and capture their attention. 72
  73. 73. © PRecious Communications 2015 Storytelling How to tell your story 1. The idea behind the story conveyed in a few words. 2. Communicating your story. 3. Graft powerful words together that pique emotion, stimulate a need, elicit a vision, and produce engagement. 4. Deliver the right content at the right time. 5. Share your content through multiple channels. 6. Be honest with your supporters. 73
  74. 74. Curiosity • Content that reveals secrets. • E.g.: Product leaks. Motivation • Content that reminds us that dreams can come true. Against the odds • David vs Goliath. Small is beautiful, big is advantage • Content that reminds us what we do matters. Affirmation • Content that confirms our assumption. Sensationalism • Content with unexpected twist. Feel good story • Content that tells a great story. New discovery • Content that challenges our discovery. Transformation • Content that inspires us to action. © PRecious Communications 2015 74 How to tell your story - Angles
  75. 75. Press Release Whitepaper Interview Holding Statement Byline Article Photo Story Round Table Event Research Comment ? Case Study Blog Post Opinion Piece Video Keynote Address Review Programme Exclusive Infographic Backgroun d Talk PR Stunt Advertorial Press Conference Survey Media Advisory © PRecious Communications 2015 75 How to tell your story - Formats
  76. 76. © PRecious Communications 2015 Storytelling Win at media relations • Look at which journalists have written about your competitors. • Send journalists compliments, notes, ideas, feedback. • Don't underestimate the power of in-person meetings with journalists. • Use current events as hooks to breaking news and inject your ideas into a breaking news stories. • Understand what writers do and what outlets they write for. 76
  77. 77. © PRecious Communications 2015 Storytelling Why me? Why now? 77
  78. 78. © PRecious Communications 2014 78 Everyday in Singapore, six people are diagnosed with a blood related disease such as leukaemia that requires a blone marrow or blood stem cell transplant. The BMDP is responsible for building and managing Singapore’s only register of volunteer donors who are willing to donate their bone marrow to save the lives of these patients. Objective • Create awareness for Singapore’s Bone Marrow Donor Programme (BMDP), • Encouraging people to sign up as donors. Action Pitch the positive, life-changing impact in the lives of patients and their families story of a patient and her donor to various print, broadcast and online media around the idea of giving the gift of life. Results Interview on 938Live (radio), The Straits Times and Shin Min newspapers (print), Yahoo (online) and a video feature done by the Singaporean of the Day project (online). Story Telling Case Study: Non-for Profit
  79. 79. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 4? Getting Your Story out there PR and storytelling How to tell a story Formats of storytelling How to pitch your story to the journalists Why me why now? © PRecious Communications 2015 79
  80. 80. © PRecious Communications 2015 80 Session 5: Managing your brand through PR • Promote key messages, differentiate the brand and enhance reputation • Using internal experts to address customer pain points • Getting started on thought leadership with a strong foundation • Thought leadership platforms on mainstream and social media
  81. 81. © PRecious Communications 2015 Content, content, content • Brands are getting desperate for content 81
  82. 82. © PRecious Communications 2015 Content Planning Example 82
  83. 83. © PRecious Communications 2015 Who is your message for? MEDIA Employees – current and potential Advertisers Businesses YOU Print Industry Local authorities National Newswires Broadcast International Regional Sharehold ers Customers Retailers and Distributors NGOs / Interest Groups Financial Analysts Primary stakeholders 83
  84. 84. © PRecious Communications 2015 Giving Substance to the Message (Message) SOCO Facts Statistics Research Anecdotes AnalogiesExpert opinion Graphics Personal experiences 84
  85. 85. © PRecious Communications 2015 Your Message House SOCO (Single Overriding Communications Objective) Message 1 Message 3Message 2 85
  86. 86. © PRecious Communications 2015 What’s in it for your audience? • A udience: What are they most concerned about? • I ncentive: How will they benefit? • M essage: Is your message credible? Will it compel and persuade? 86
  87. 87. © PRecious Communications 2015 Multi-Platform Outreach • Is your content relevant? • Is your content released at the right timing? • Who are the relevant (media) channels to reach your audience? • What’s the right content and timing for each channel? 87
  88. 88. © PRecious Communications 2015 Multi-Platform Outreach • Is your content relevant? • Is your content released at the right timing? • Who are the relevant (media) channels to reach your audience? 88
  89. 89. THOUGHT LEADER? THOUGHT LEADERSHIP? • WHAT IS A THOUGHT LEADER TO YOU? • WHAT IS THOUGHT LEADRSHIP TO YOU? FOOD FOR THOUGHT.. 89
  90. 90. A thought leader is an individual or firm that prospects, clients, referral sources, intermediaries and even competitors recognise as one of the foremost authorities in selected areas of specialisation, resulting in its being the go-to individual or organisation for said expertise. Russ Alan Prince and Bruce Rogers, authors of Profitable Brilliance A thought leader is a person who identifies trends, common themes and patterns within a particular industry or functional area of expertise to help others identify new opportunities or solutions for growth. Glenn Llopis, thought-leadership, human capital and business strategy consultant What is a… Thought Leader 90
  91. 91. Thought leadership should be an entry point to a relationship. Thought leadership should intrigue, challenge, and inspire even people already familiar with a company. It should help start a relationship where none exists, and it should enhance existing relationships. Daniel W. Rasmus, author of Listening to the Future What is a… Thought Leader 91
  92. 92. Source: Forbes.com, Dorie Clark How to become a… Thought Leader 92
  93. 93. 1.Start with one thing 2.Ride a growing wave 3.Expand your empire 4.Go where the people are How to become a… Thought Leader 93
  94. 94. © PRecious Communications 2015 Thought Leadership • Using internal experts to address customer pain points − Listen to gaps in the industry conversation and identify key areas of confusion / hot topics − Leverage in-house data to fill in gaps in customer dialogues − Give solutions to customer problems − Help them overcome obstacles 94
  95. 95. © PRecious Communications 2015 Thought Leadership • Using internal experts to address customer pain points − Listen to gaps in the industry conversation and identify key areas of confusion / hot topics − Leverage in-house data to fill in gaps in customer dialogues − Give solutions to customer problems − Help them overcome obstacles 95 Who would be experts in your organization? What should they talk about?
  96. 96. © PRecious Communications 2015 Thought Leadership • Media positioning: Distinguishing your brand • Stay ahead of the curve Who could be experts outdide your organization? What should they talk about?
  97. 97. 97
  98. 98. What would be suitable platforms? 98
  99. 99. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 5? Managing your brand through PR Promote key messages, differentiate the brand and enhance reputation Using internal experts to address customer pain points Getting started on thought leadership with a strong foundation Thought leadership platforms on mainstream and social media © PRecious Communications 2015 99
  100. 100. © PRecious Communications 2015 100 Session 6: Traditional Media • Paid / owned / earned media • Targeting different types of journalists: beat reporters, desk editors, wire reporters, print, TV, etc. • Forging lasting relationships with key media players • Managing the often contentious relationship between PR and journalists • Increasing engagement levels with journalists through exclusive content • Ethical issues in having relationships with the media
  101. 101. © PRecious Communications 2015 An additional sphere for your biz 101
  102. 102. © PRecious Communications 2015 Content Management • Brand Advocacy − News agenda tracking − From content creation to creation of value − Creating community around topics or issues 102
  103. 103. © PRecious Communications 2015 Media Relations • What’s your (exclusive) angle? • Can you handle the spotlight? • What’s your spokesperson’s preferred setting? 103
  104. 104. © PRecious Communications 2015 Matching Influencers to Topics 104
  105. 105. © PRecious Communications 2015 What does the media really want? Bridging the Gap Media and Blogger Engagement Survey Brought to you by: 105
  106. 106. # Question Not Important Somewhat Important Important Highly Important 1 Headline should be within 10-15 words and tell the key news. 0.00% 10.87% 34.78% 54.35% 2 It is more important to have a strong, relevant story hook in the first paragraph rather than ticking off the usual what / when / where / how etc. 4.35% 15.22% 36.96% 43.48% 3 The total length of the media release should be within 500 words. 15.22% 26.09% 39.13% 19.57% 4 The media release should include quotes from relevant spokespeople. 15.22% 32.61% 36.96% 15.22% 5 The release should come together with biographies of the spokespeople quoted. 28.26% 28.26% 36.96% 6.52% 4. How important are the following attributes in a press release? Close to 90% 80 % 106
  107. 107. 4. How important are the following attributes in a press release? # Question Not Important Somewhat Important Important Highly Important 6 A direct contact with email and phone number should be included for every media release. 4.35% 6.52% 17.39% 71.74% 7 Language of the media release should be suitable for the target audience in terms of tone, jargon etc. 0.00% 17.39% 39.13% 43.48% 8 Avoid marketing talk and quotes that are hardly encountered in real life. 6.52% 15.22% 39.13% 39.13% 9 There should be minimal formatting or restrictions for media releases so as to enable easy editing (e.g. no PDF). 10.87% 21.74% 36.96% 30.43% 10 With quotations, photographs of spokespeople should be included along with the media release document as separate files. 17.39% 23.91% 39.13% 19.57% Over 80% Close to 80% Over 75% 107
  108. 108. 4. How important are the following attributes in a press release? Close to 85% # Question Not Important Somewhat Important Important Highly Important 11 For statistics, infographics should be included along with the media release. 13.04% 21.74% 43.48% 21.74% 12 Let others talk about your company or product - include quotes from third parties like customers or industry experts. 17.39% 32.61% 47.83% 2.17% 13 The story should include links to additional information like previous releases, backgrounders etc to provide context. 8.70% 21.74% 45.65% 23.91% 14 For product releases, the focus should be on differentiators and customer benefits instead of just features. 0.00% 15.22% 43.48% 41.30% 15 There has to be more than just text, ideally with videos, photos or infographics included. 10.87% 15.22% 45.65% 28.26% 108
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  112. 112. © PRecious Communications 2015 On a slightly lighter note… 112
  113. 113. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 6? Traditional Media Paid / owned / earned media Targeting different types of journalists: beat reporters, desk editors, wire reporters, print, TV, etc. Forging lasting relationships with key media players Managing the often contentious relationship between PR and journalists Increasing engagement levels with journalists through exclusive content Ethical issues in having relationships with the media © PRecious Communications 2015 113
  114. 114. © PRecious Communications 2015 114 Session 7: Understanding Communications Trends • How technology and social media have changed PR • Understanding multimedia journalism • Shifting from platform centricism to customer centricism • The rise of alternative media outlets • The role of social media
  115. 115. © PRecious Communications 2015 Public RelationsAdvertising Brand Reputation “I HEARD HE IS A GREAT LOVER.” [Adopted from “The difference between marketing, pr, advertising & branding”; Now with Social Media Marketing] Social Media Marketing 115
  116. 116. © PRecious Communications 2015 Source: What happens on the Internet every 60 seconds - Rosa Golijan
  117. 117. © PRecious Communications 2015
  118. 118. © PRecious Communications 2015 The BIG Cultural Dilemma Be (Seen) Innovative – But Please Don’t Take Any Risk, Use Only Proven Methods 118
  119. 119. [Brands] have to surprise me, not only meet my needs, but anticipate my needs. By using social media exclusively, I think the company has to answer me whenever I have a question, enlighten me whenever I complain, and thank me whenever I compliment them. Source: The Language of Love in Social Media - Firefly Millward Brown Customers are demanding 119
  120. 120. © PRecious Communications 2015 The BIG Cultural Dilemma #2 • From natural respect to suspicion • Are you approachable? • Why would people want to connect with you? 120
  121. 121. Source: Digital Life 2011 - TNS 32% 11% 13% 45% What are people saying? 121
  122. 122. © PRecious Communications 2015 Communications Perspectives Social or not, it’s about relations 122
  123. 123. © PRecious Communications 2015 How technology has changed PR Everything Changes It’s about two-way conversations You’ve to deal with more channels We HAVE to listen and understand what’s said! What about those negative comments and posts? The game get’s so much faster Nothing Changes You’ve to manage relationships So it’s wires, print, broadcast – and social media You already: monitor and analyze your media coverage Not every negative comment means a crisis Already forgot newswires? Look at trends over time 123
  124. 124. © PRecious Communications 2015 Social Media: Where to Start? Two things might help: 1. The inequality of the web 2. The concept of target media 124
  125. 125. © PRecious Communications 2015 Listening 90-9-1 Principle: The Inequality of the Web Source: Jakob Nielsen - Participation Inequality: Encouraging More Users to Contribute 125
  126. 126. © PRecious Communications 2015 Are you catching the long tail? • How many relevant social media sites are there? • How many should—or simply, can—you monitor or even measure? 126
  127. 127. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is a community? Groups of people who… • Share a common passion, interest, or objective • Come together to learn from each other • Want to do something together An interactive group of people joined together by a common topic or interest 127
  128. 128. © PRecious Communications 2015 WHY HOW WHAT
  129. 129. 129 • Business-to-business shipping company. • 420,000 fans on Facebook and a comprehensive presence on 9 other platforms in less than 11 months (now over 2 million). • Facebook – Reach out to followers which include NGOs, employees, potential employees, competition, suppliers, regulatory bodies. • Twitter – Journalists following us and can see when they download their press releases from Twitter.
  130. 130. 130 • LinkedIn: – “serious professional forum” where they company can have conversations with customers. – bring together shipping experts to discuss issues like piracy, trends affecting the container industry and innovation. • Google+ Hangouts – Hold smaller press briefings when the company is launching new initiatives. • Own website dedicated to social media. “ Social media is about communication, not marketing. It’s about connecting and engaging, not about pushing your products…. We never thought of it as a campaign, but rather as a way of being, a presence.” - Jonathan Wichmann, Maersk Line’s Head of Social Media 130
  131. 131. Case Study 131
  132. 132. © PRecious Communications 2015 Source: Your Social Media Marketing in 5 easy steps - Jasmine Sandler, ClickZ • Your business model, mission, products and services, target audience, current marketing efforts Step 1: Create Your Executive Overview Business Plan • Validate a new product or service using social as a research platform. • Develop buzz and interest around a new product. • Engage users in social to generate relevant and targeted traffic to your site. Step 2: Define Your Specific Social Media Goals • Create and implement a voice that resonates with your specific target audience. • For each audience type, break down and research age, income, location, and reasons for possibly buying your products/services. Step 3: Find Your SMM Voice • Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and many more. Look at social tools statistics. e.g: Demographics Step 4: Choosing Your Social Tools Appropriately • Your frequency of content delivery & response to social engagement. • Your types and specific topics for content creation. • Ways to increase audience engagement. • Events that can drive social. • Your social success metrics Step 5: Plan & Execute Content & Delivery 132
  133. 133. Challenge within Organizations: Who‘owns’ Social Media? • The lines between PR and marketing are blurring. • “Turf battles” are evident. • Ownership of social media and blogging still undecided. • Benefits and communication measurement provides common ground. 133
  134. 134. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 7? Understanding communiations trends How technology and social media have changed PR Understanding multimedia journalism Shifting from platform centricism to customer centricism The rise of alternative media outlets The role of social media © PRecious Communications 2015 134
  135. 135. © PRecious Communications 2015 135 Excurse: Integrated Campaign Old Spice
  136. 136. © PRecious Communications 2015 136 Excurse: Agency Relations
  137. 137. © PRecious Communications 2015 137 Excurse: Agency Relations
  138. 138. © PRecious Communications 2015 138 Session 8: Press Conferences • Press conference dos & don’ts • What journalists want out of your press conference • Handling tricky situations
  139. 139. © PRecious Communications 2015 On a slightly lighter note… 139
  140. 140. © PRecious Communications 2015 Small group discussion What is your main concern about running a press conference? 140
  141. 141. © PRecious Communications 2015 Small group discussion What defines success for a press conference? 141
  142. 142. © PRecious Communications 2015 What journalists want When a reporter asks you a question… 142
  143. 143. © PRecious Communications 2015 Answerperson vs Spokesperson Answerperson • DEFENSIVE • Responds PASSIVELY • Answers the MEDIA • Low energy Spokesperson • PROACTIVE • On message • In control • HIGH energy • This is your brand! 143
  144. 144. © PRecious Communications 2015 How does he come across? 144
  145. 145. © PRecious Communications 2015 On a slightly lighter note… 145
  146. 146. Basics: • Location • Time • Material What do they need? • Think print • Think photo • Think broadcast Expert level: • Media needs guidance / context • Key: A strong MC What journalists want
  147. 147. • Make it easy and convenient (eg for AV) – Offer sound feed and power plugs – Make it visual (backdrop, photo opportunities) – Provide camera teams with good sight-lines – Think about possible noise disturbances (planes, construction, AC) • Media material (Press Kits) – Press release, fact sheet, bios, visuals, contact • Think about the location and room – Convenience and size • Proceedings – Opening statements, MC, clear agenda – Time for Q&A – Factor in time for briefings and FAQ – What’s next (follow ups)?! What journalists want
  148. 148. © PRecious Communications 2015 Handling Tricky Situations Bridging phrases • “What I really want to stress is…” • “The main is…” • “We may be overlooking the fact that…” • “Another important point…” • “Let’s put this into perspective…” • “That’s not the issue. The real issue is…” • “What people want to know is…” • “I don’t know about that, but I do know…” • “It boils down to this…” • “We prefer not to speculate, but…” 148
  149. 149. Bonus: The Art of Blocking and Bridging Block Bridge Communicate No, that is inaccurate This is what actually happened, let’s put things in perspective… Key Message That is an area outside of my authority But I can tell you this…. Key Message It’s not our policy to operate in that way We took the following approach… Key Message We prefer not to speculate At this stage all we can say is…… Key Message 149 149
  150. 150. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 8? Press Conferences Press conference dos & don’ts What journalists want out of your press conference Handling tricky situations © PRecious Communications 2015 150
  151. 151. © PRecious Communications 2015 151 Session 9: PR Measurement • Managing what you measure, identifying the right objectives • Output vs. outtakes vs. outcomes / awareness – opinion – behaviour • PR is always comparative: What’s your benchmark? • Social media ROI: Measuring your online success
  152. 152. © PRecious Communications 2015 Why measure media? Quick question: Why do you want to measure? 152
  153. 153. © PRecious Communications 2015 Why measure media? • What key initiatives did you drive? Reason 1: Outputs. Demonstrate the value of PR • How do you connect with publications & journalists, campaigns? • What's your brand perception? Reason 2: Outtakes. Plan & evaluate communications activities across channels and markets • How do your results relate to the budget allocation? Do you measure KPIs linking PR to business results? Whatis the value PR adds to your organization? Reason 3: Outcomes. Strategic communications • What's happening in the industry, with my clients? • Is there a crisis? • Are there issues? Reason 4: Radar. Discovering opportunities and threats 153
  154. 154. © PRecious Communications 2015 Alignment Aligning measurement with business objectives • Managing what you measure, identifying the right objectives and setting smart goals • Too many communicators work very hard on tactics… that DON’T support corporate goals! 154
  155. 155. © PRecious Communications 2015 Output / Outtakes / Outcomes • Output − What is generated as a result of a PR program or campaign • Outtakes − What audiences have understood and / or heeded and / or responded to • Outcomes − Quantifiable changes in awareness, knowledge, attitude, opinion, and behavior levels 155
  156. 156. Too dry, too theoretical, too complicated?
  157. 157. Won 6 games Won 5 games 8 goals scored 16 goals scored 7 matches played 7 matches played OUTCOME METRIC has to answer “So what?” OUTTAKE METRIC OUTPUT METRIC ACTIONGOAL 2010 World Champion Win matchesScore goalsPlay in the final round in South Africa Become the best country WORLD CHAMPION 3rd Place How to translate this to PR? Example: Football Worldcup 157
  158. 158. © PRecious Communications 2015 Output / Outtakes / Outcomes Typical metrics GOAL ACTION (INPUT) OUTPUT METRIC OUTTAKE METRIC OUTCOME METRIC Has to answer: “So what?” Sales Leads Place product reviews Initiate speakers program Proactive blogger outreach # meetings # of speaking engagements # of blog mentions # of reviews # of media contacts made # of news releases sent % awareness of your brand % considering your brand % preferring your brand # of requests for information 158
  159. 159. Benchmarking Who are they talking about? What are topics/ issues discussed? How good is your brand image? How is your media footprint globally? 159
  160. 160. Benchmarking What are trends in traditional vs. social media? Who is writing about you? What are keywords of your brand coverage? 160
  161. 161. © PRecious Communications 2015 Media Analysis Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting: “Measurement is not counting. Or monitoring. It is not the number of followers, friends, rankings, or scores. Measurement is a process that requires you to compare results against something—either with your competition or with your results over time. You note the change, analyze the reasons why, and improve your program accordingly.” Source: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting, KD Payne 161
  162. 162. © PRecious Communications 2015 Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? . . . RETURN ON INVESTMENT 162
  163. 163. © PRecious Communications 2015 Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? . . . RETURN ON ATTENTION
  164. 164. © PRecious Communications 2015 Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? . . . RETURN ON ENGAGEMENT
  165. 165. © PRecious Communications 2015 Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? . . . RETURN ON TRUST
  166. 166. © PRecious Communications 2015 Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? . . . RETURN ON PARTICIPATION
  167. 167. © PRecious Communications 2015 ROI is a business metric Can you connect your PR investments ($$$ ) with the financial impact, e.g. sales or savings ($$$)? ROI = COST OF INVESTMENT (GAIN FROM INVESTMENT - COST OF INVESTMENT) 167
  168. 168. © PRecious Communications 2015 Two Core Metrics 1. Influence 2. Engagement Sources: Social Media Metrics 168
  169. 169. © PRecious Communications 2015 Ratings worth monitoring • Blogs • Facebook • Twitter • Youtube 169
  170. 170. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 9? PR Measurement Managing what you measure, identifying the right objectives Output vs. outtakes vs. outcomes / awareness – opinion – behaviour PR is always comparative: What’s your benchmark? Social media ROI: Measuring your online success © PRecious Communications 2015 170
  171. 171. © PRecious Communications 2015 171 Session 10: Crisis management and contingencies • Crisis preparedness • During crisis • Post crisis
  172. 172. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is a reputation? The beliefs or opinions that are held about someone or something by the community or general public. 172
  173. 173. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is crisis? • unexpected • creating uncertainty • seen as a threat 173
  174. 174. Nestlé's social media crisis
  175. 175. Nestlé's social media crisis Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign 175
  176. 176. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page 176
  177. 177. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” 177
  178. 178. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…)
  179. 179. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable
  180. 180. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable
  181. 181. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable What are your Rules of Engagement? A crisis response protocol? How fast can you react? Who decides?
  182. 182. Crisis Fundamentals Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? 182
  183. 183. Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? 183 When a crisis happens: Get it fast, Get it right, Get it out, and Get it over! Your problem won’t improve with age. N. Augustine, CEO Lockhead Martin Time is crucial for managing risk as it allows you to stay in the ‘driver seat’ Crisis Fundamentals
  184. 184. © PRecious Communications 2015 What is a crisis? • What constitutes a real crisis • Scenario planning (internal / external) • Business continuity vs communications • Assessing potential crisis issues (audit) • Crisis-management team responsibilities • Setting up emergency communication plans (internal / external; channels) • Regular checks, updates, refreshers • Activation plans (e.g. for external partners) 184
  185. 185. © PRecious Communications 2015 Crisis Preparedness By the time you hear the thunder, it’s too late to build the ark. 185
  186. 186. © PRecious Communications 2015 Listening How to be a good listener • 99% noise
  187. 187. © PRecious Communications 2015 During Crisis Before the crisis: Be prepared for everything! • How to identify and prepare for different scenarios? What could be the critical decisions and the right people pre-authorized to make them? • How should your activation plans look like; who would need to get involved in your crisis team for which scenario? • Developing a crisis handbook as your first-stop manual with basic scenarios and prepared reactions – drafting a first response checklist • Why a social media crisis plan should be at the TOP of every brand and organization’s to-do list, before they begin to market on social media 187
  188. 188. © PRecious Communications 2015 During Crisis Size doesn’t matter A failure to engage a captive and influential audience represents an utter misunderstanding of the power that online communities wield in crisis. What Got You Here, Won’t Get You There It is essential to at least assuage consumer fears by acknowledging the problem and affirming that all that can be done is being done You Can Not Advertise Out of Crisis Traditional advertising and brand/reputation management cannot work in a galaxy where crisis moves at the speed of light. 188
  189. 189. Sorry seems to be the hardest word… • Don't RE-act right away • Acknowledge - Don't be angry • Admit the mistake and apologize • Take ownership • Ask for forgiveness and make the needed changes – use the magic words: “I’m sorry” and “thank you” [or at least a “we feel terrible about this”] Source: When You're Wrong, Say You're Sorry - SOLUTIONS: Social Media 189
  190. 190. © PRecious Communications 2015 Post Crisis Recovery • Downsizing the crisis team & media centre • Keep spokespersons on alert • Changing your story • Diligent media monitoring • Starting the “back-to-normal” plans • Work on crisis management does not stop when the noise ends • Continue to cultivate your KOLs, monitoring social media activity for signs of further flare ups, and following up with your consumers • Having a ready-react-recover program 190
  191. 191. © PRecious Communications 2015 Case study: #RaceTogether http://www.marketing-interactive.com/starbucks-race-together/ 191
  192. 192. When written in Chinese the word crisis is composed of two characters. One represents danger, and the other represents opportunity John F. Kenney - 1959 192
  193. 193. Quick Recap: What did you learn from Session 10? Crisis management and contingencies Crisis preparedness During crisis Post crisis © PRecious Communications 2015 193
  194. 194. Our Programme March 31, © PRecious Communications 2015 194 Day 1 1) Understanding Public Relations 2) Objectives and Stakeholders 3) Generating Your Ideas 4) Getting Your Story Out 5) Managing Your brand through PR Day 2 6) Traditional Media 7) Communications Trends 8) Press Conferences 9) PR Measurement 10) Crisis Management
  195. 195. What we do Summarise and present the outcome Execute required ideas Propose relevant ideas Understand a partner’s PR needs 195 Social media Press releases Events Interviews Newsletters Integrated Marketing Comms © PRecious Communications 2015
  196. 196. Global connections through a worldwide network of experts Hub-and-spoke approach: Using Singapore as a base to reach out in a tailored approach to other target markets. 196
  197. 197. Thank You Lars Voedisch Email. lars@preciouscomms.com Tel. +65-3151 4760 PRecious Communications Pte Ltd 21 Club Street, #02-11 Singapore 069419 © PRecious Communications 2015 197

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