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LHBS INSIGHT-SNAPSHOT
MAY 2015
LHBS is an unconventional strategy firm that helps its clients to solve
two of the most fundamental questions in business:
...
This presentation includes some of the most interesting signs of
emerging and shifting consumer behavior.
All signs are ou...
 
Parents Love Energy Drinks
	
  
According to a new report by Mintel, the market research company, American moms and dads...
 
Consumers Don’t Trust Big Food Brands
	
  
Big brands are looking into ways to reestablish their identity amongst the na...
 
Average-Sized Models Sell More Clothes
	
  
New research from the University of Kent shows that using average-sized mode...
 
Monogamish Millennials
	
  
Relationships boundaries become more fluid, as people are more open to exploring less convent...
 
Crying Rooms in Japan
	
  
In Japan, some hotels offer women "crying rooms" that are designed to help them relieve stres...
 
Young Women Do Not Want To Wear Thongs
	
  
Sales data shows that thongs have had their moment and full-bottom underwear...
 
Consumers Prefer Brands That Care
	
  
The findings from a study by advertising agency Havas, Meaningful Brands, has foun...
 
Highly Educated Women Having More Children
	
  
Women with doctorate degree and in high-powered careers are increasingly...
 
Pink & Glitter Marketing To Young Girls
	
  
New research uncovers why brands should stop market pink, princess and glit...
 
"Fitspo": Inspiring or Encouraging Unrealistic Body Standards?
	
  
Does the healthy-obsessed “fitspo” trend, actually ma...
•  How your organization can track relevant business and innovation
opportunities?
•  How other industries and companies a...
THANK YOU!
Impressum:
Die in dieser Präsentation dokumentierten Gedanken und Vorschläge sind geistiges Eigentum der
LHBS C...
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Insight-Snapshot May 2015

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LHBS continuously tracks changes in people, markets and technology to deliver curated and customised information to different organisations.

With a team of researchers collecting data on a daily basis for the Inspiration-Hub– an internal digital tool to monitor change and deliver relevant insights and inspiration– we would like to share these findings with our readers in a new way.

This presentation includes some of the most inspirational examples we have recently stumbled upon in the areas of marketing, service and product innovation.

Veröffentlicht in: Marketing
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Insight-Snapshot May 2015

  1. 1. LHBS INSIGHT-SNAPSHOT MAY 2015
  2. 2. LHBS is an unconventional strategy firm that helps its clients to solve two of the most fundamental questions in business: About LHBS Understand Today Shape Tomorrow How are customer needs & expectations evolving? How can companies create value for customers and benefit from it?
  3. 3. This presentation includes some of the most interesting signs of emerging and shifting consumer behavior. All signs are out of our Inspiration-Hub, a digital platform that tracks changes in people, markets and technology to bring customized insights and inspiration to your organization. LHBS Insight-Snapshot
  4. 4.   Parents Love Energy Drinks   According to a new report by Mintel, the market research company, American moms and dads are the bigger consumers of energy drinks than their childless counterparts. This finding is an interesting contrast to the stereotype that energy drinks were consumed by athletes, truck drivers, and video gamers. Instead, the study claims, parents are more likely to use energy drinks than those without children, and the numbers are a bit startling. While only 34% of childless men consume energy drinks, 68% of dads do. For mothers, 38% of mothers consume such beverages while only 22% of women without children drink them. Despite these surprising numbers, the market energy drinks continue to grow, with a 56% increase in energy drink consumption between 2009-2014, with another 52% growth predicted over the next five years.     *  Source:  Mintel  Energy  Drink  Report  2015  
  5. 5.   Consumers Don’t Trust Big Food Brands   Big brands are looking into ways to reestablish their identity amongst the natural food movement and changing customer expectations.  The eating habits of modern consumers are changing— people are choosing fresh vegetables in place of frozen ones, granola instead of cereals and fruit instead of sweets—and sales of puddings, canned pasta, and ready-made dinners are also decreasing. In addition, customers look for smaller brands that are healthier, more transparent and authentic—and they grow skeptical about big food brands being able to deliver these. In the past years, big corporations earned a deserved reputation of not being transparent, sacrificing quality to cut costs and even including toxic ingredients in their recipes. However, the apparent dominance of the large corporations seems to be slowly eroding— according to the BCG report, between 2009 and 2014 $18 billion of US sales have shifted away from large to small food companies.  *  Source:  Large  Companies  Cede  Further  Share  in  U.S.  Consumer  Packaged  Goods  Market  
  6. 6.   Average-Sized Models Sell More Clothes   New research from the University of Kent shows that using average-sized models increases the sales.  The recent study has shown that aside creating body image issues, thin models actually sell fewer clothes than the average-sized ones. With the existing fashion brands, the polled women show no partiality towards the zero and average-sized models. However, when it came to made-up “new brands”, women chose clothes that were presented by models with average sizes, over the ones modeled by very thin girls.  *  Source:  Research  suggests  average-­‐sized  models  could  sell  more  fashion  
  7. 7.   Monogamish Millennials   Relationships boundaries become more fluid, as people are more open to exploring less conventional types of relationships. The new couples are not like the “free love” hippies of the 60’s but neither the strict-ruled marriages of 1990. The movement is fueled by though not limited to, millennials who are choosing their own ways of living (or not) in relationships. Typically, the couples tend to be young professionals in varying levels of commitment— and on occasions considering or actively searching for an outside companionship. And, of course, there is an app for that— though it differs from these used for a hookup or affair. OpenMinded claims that it “offers a safe and stigma-free environment that brings the ease and flexibility of online dating to the currently under- served world of open and alternative relationships”. The aim is to make monogamy an open dialogue rather than a taboo.  *  Source:  The  Washington  Post  
  8. 8.   Crying Rooms in Japan   In Japan, some hotels offer women "crying rooms" that are designed to help them relieve stress.  Rooms can be booked for 10,000 Japanese yen per day (around 70 euros) and contain tissues, warm sheets and eye masks. The TVs contain playlists with typical tearjerker movies and every room has sad manga comic books. However, the hotels with "crying rooms" are not the only type of special amenities in Japan. In "love hotels" couple can rent a room per hour for some amorous and private time. There are also "cuddle cafes" where men pay to sleep next to a girl and "cat cafes" where people can enjoy their coffee while petting a cat.  *  Source:  TTG  Asia  
  9. 9.   Young Women Do Not Want To Wear Thongs   Sales data shows that thongs have had their moment and full-bottom underwear is being increasingly considered cool amongst young women.  Millennial and Generation Z women are discovering underwear that used to be reserved “for grannies”, and are embracing comfortable and practical fuller brief styles. Sales of thongs have been decreasing year-on-year and sales of fuller styles— briefs, boy shorts and high-waist briefs— have grown by 17% in the past year alone. The research on how young women shop for lingerie has found that the majority do not choose for themselves, and is instead asking if their partner will like it —an attitude that the store encouraged with underwear primarily designed to appeal to men. However, the number of young women that think that the goal of lingerie is to seduce is decreasing. Millennial women believe their sexuality should be based on their own likes and pleasures— and what is sexy to them is being and feeling natural and comfortable.  *  Source:  NYT—  Women  Say  No  To  Thongs    
  10. 10.   Consumers Prefer Brands That Care   The findings from a study by advertising agency Havas, Meaningful Brands, has found that meaningful brands enjoy increased sales, more awareness and higher annual returns.  According to the study, the top 25 meaningful brands outperformed the stock market by 133%. In addition, customers are 46% more likely to purchase a brand that is considered to be meaningful. Further findings show that “for every 10% increase in meaningfulness, a brand can increase its purchase and repurchase intent by 6% and price premiums by 10.4%” which statistically proves that a brand’s meaningfulness is a key driver of KPI success. When it comes to purchasing a product, not only are customers buying into the functional benefit, but they also look for more personal connection. As the study shows, they care more and spend more on brands that enhance their personal wellbeing and create a bigger impact on societies and communities we care about.  *  Source:  Meaningful  Brands  
  11. 11.   Highly Educated Women Having More Children   Women with doctorate degree and in high-powered careers are increasingly choosing to have bigger families.  Census data from the US shows that in 1994, 35% of women aged 40-44 with a doctorate were childless but in 2014 the figure has already fallen to only 20%.  Women who choose to have children are also more likely to have bigger families—  the numbers with two children or more is increasing too. What can explain these numbers? It seems that the social changes in the nature of marriage are the main driver. Men are more likely to share the housework and childcare with women. In 1965, mothers spend as much as seven times longer caring for children, comparing to fathers. In 2012, the figure fell to only twice as much— making it easier for women to remain in her career and opt for another child. With the growing number of high-powered career women having children, companies started responding with more flexible contracts offering part-time work and longer maternity leaves, which enabled women in deciding to have another child.  *  Source:  Childlessness  Falls,  Family  Size  Grows  Among  Highly  Educated  Women  
  12. 12.   Pink & Glitter Marketing To Young Girls   New research uncovers why brands should stop market pink, princess and glitter stereotypes to young girls.  “Little Miss Understood” is a survey conducted by Pineapple Lounge: an agency that specialises in researching children’s opinions. The research has revealed that 27% of girls aged 8-10 dislike “princess and pink” stereotypes and the figure grows higher with age: amongst girls aged 13-14, nearly 40% did not like it. Half of the girls surveyed said that that engage with brands that help them make fun- with 41% interested in celebrities and nearly 60% in video games. Young girls also like when brands encourage them to think differently (33%) and be themselves (51%). An alarming part of the study revealed that young girls self-esteem lowers as they age: they are less likely to be confident about their future, happiness and gender equality than young boys. 
  13. 13.   "Fitspo": Inspiring or Encouraging Unrealistic Body Standards?   Does the healthy-obsessed “fitspo” trend, actually manages to inspire healthier lives or is it just another form of body fascism?  “Fitspo” is a shorter term for “fitspiration”, a trend that consists of “inspiring” mirror selfies of lycra clad people with perfect abs, supported with encouraging quotes and Instagram feed of clean food and after workout  snacks. The “motivational” language is also somewhat extreme: pain is progress, fat is shameful and there no room for the weak. Until this date, the movement has already gained millions of followers, produced numerous Instagram celebrities, blog millionaires, published books and signed deals with fitness brands. The rise in health consciousness  and interest in fitness is certainly a good thing in the world which is increasingly battling with growing obesity numbers. But is this health obsession actually healthy for us?  *  Source:  Fitness  Living,  Fitspo  Blog  
  14. 14. •  How your organization can track relevant business and innovation opportunities? •  How other industries and companies affect your customer needs? •  How insights & inspiration be can easily accessed and shared within your organization to fuel innovation? Please feel free to visit inspiration-hub.com or get in touch with Fabiola Lewandowska at fl@lhbs.com. If you would like to learn more about:  
  15. 15. THANK YOU! Impressum: Die in dieser Präsentation dokumentierten Gedanken und Vorschläge sind geistiges Eigentum der LHBS Consulting Berlin GmbH und unterliegen den geltenden Urhebergesetzen. Die unautorisierte Nutzung, die ganze oder teilweise Vervielfältigung sowie jede Weitergabe an Dritte ist nicht gestattet. LHBS Consulting Berlin GmbH Köpenicker Straße 154  10997 Berlin Germany  

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