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Cognitive theory of multimedia learning, krista greear, csun 2017

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Cognitive theory of multimedia learning, krista greear, csun 2017

  1. 1. Krista Greear Assistant Director Disability Resources for Students greeark@uw.edu Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning
  2. 2. > Been in industry since 2007 > Working on Masters since 2014 Backstory
  3. 3. Agenda > Theory > Reaction > Analysis > So what?
  4. 4. Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning > Hypothesis: learning by pictures and words is better than words alone > How to maximize learning when using pictures and words
  5. 5. Words > Printed text > Spoken text
  6. 6. Pictures
  7. 7. Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning
  8. 8. Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning
  9. 9. Why So Interesting? > Convert textbooks and documents into accessible formats > Convert videos into accessible formats > Work with websites as needed
  10. 10. All I do is work with multimedia!
  11. 11. (1) Dual-channel > a channel for processing visual/pictorial (pictures) > a separate channel for processing auditory/verbal (words)… – Baddeley’s theory of working memory – Paivio’s dual coding theory
  12. 12. (2) Limited capacity > …each channel has a limited capacity and… – Sweller’s cognitive load theory
  13. 13. (3) Active-processing > …active learning occurs when learner engages in cognitive processing (Moreno & Mayer, 2002). – Cognitive theory
  14. 14. What’s the Problem?
  15. 15. (1) Dual-channel > a channel for processing visual/pictorial (pictures) > a separate channel for processing auditory/verbal (words)…
  16. 16. Concerns > Assumes that both channels work similarly across all humans – Blind? Deaf? Auditory processing disorders? Deaf-Blind? Traumatic brain injuries? Learning disabilities? > What about tactile? Where’s that “channel”?
  17. 17. (2) Limited capacity > …each channel has a limited capacity and…
  18. 18. Likes > Emphasizes cognitive load theory
  19. 19. Concerns > Does not account for differences in capacity in two channels – Blind humans often listen to content 2-3 times faster than non-blind humans
  20. 20. (3) Active-processing > …active learning occurs when learner engages in cognitive processing (Moreno & Mayer, 2002).
  21. 21. > Neuroplasticity General Concerns
  22. 22. General Concerns > Individual differences – Although human brains all share the same basic recognition architecture and recognize things in roughly the same way, our recognition networks come in many shapes, sizes, and patterns. In anatomy, connectivity, physiology, and chemistry, each of us has a brain that is slightly different from everyone else’s. (Rose & Meyer, 2002, p. 17).
  23. 23. “Evidence-based” Principles of CTML
  24. 24. Coherence Principle > Use simpler visuals to promote understanding > Avoid irrelevant graphics, stories, and lengthy text > Avoid irrelevant videos, animations, music, stories, and lengthy narrations
  25. 25. Contiguity Principle > Integrate text nearby the graphic on the screen > Avoid covering or separating information that must be integrated for learning > Allow learners to play an animation before or after reviewing a text description
  26. 26. Segmentation Principle > Break content down into small topic chunks that can be accessed at the learner’s preferred rate (using a continue or next button) > Use a continue and replay button on animations that are segmented into short logical stopping points
  27. 27. Multimedia Principle > Use relevant graphics and text to communicate content > Use explanatory visuals that show relationships among content topics to build deeper understanding
  28. 28. Redundancy Principle > Do not present words as both onscreen text and narration when there are graphics on the screen
  29. 29. Implications
  30. 30. Universal Design for Learning > accommodate the widest spectrum of users without individual adaptation or specialized design (Rose & Meyer, 2002) > addressing the divergent needs of special populations increase[s] usability for everyone (p. 71)
  31. 31. Intellectual Crisis > CTML (theory) vs UDL (framework) > Instructional Design vs Disability Services > Research vs reality
  32. 32. Need Cross Collaboration

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