Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.
ETHNOCENTRISM
AND RELATIVISM
1
ETHNOCENTRISM
• is judging another culture solely
by the values and standards of
one's own culture.
2
• Ethnocentric individuals judge
other groups relative to their
own ethnic group or culture,
especially with concern for
l...
. These ethnic distinctions and
subdivisions serve to define
each (culture) ethnicity's unique
cultural identity.
4
•
• According to William G. Sumner,
ethnocentrism is defined as the
“technical name for the view of
things in which one's ...
• He further characterized it as often
leading to pride, vanity, beliefs of
one's own group's superiority, and
contempt of...
In the study of Anthropology
• Ethnocentric are: People born into a
particular culture that grow up
absorbing the values a...
• If people then experience other
cultures that have different
values and normal behaviors,
they will find that the though...
• However, since people are
accustomed to their birth
culture, it can be difficult for
them to see the behaviors of
people...
• Examples of ethnocentrism
include religiocentric constructs
claiming a divine association like
"divine nation", "
One Na...
11
Cultural Relativism
• is the principle that an individual
person's beliefs and activities
should be understood by other...
• It was established as accepted in
anthropological research by Franz
Boas in the first few decades of
the 20th century an...
• Cultural relativism was in part a
response to Western
ethnocentrism. Ethnocentrism
may take obvious forms, in which
one ...
• Boas first articulated the idea in
1887: "civilization is not
something absolute, but is
relative, and our ideas and
con...
Franz Boas, originally trained
in physics and geography,
argued that one's culture may
mediate and thus limit one's
percep...
He understood "culture" to
include not only certain tastes in
food, art, and music, or beliefs
about religion. He assumed ...
• the totality of the mental and
physical reactions and activities that
characterize the behavior of the
individuals compo...
This understanding of culture
confronts anthropologists with
two problems:
•first, how to escape the unconscious
bonds of ...
GENERALIZATION:
• Ethnocentrism – the tendency to
assume that one’s own culture and
way of life represent the norm or are
...
Nächste SlideShare
Wird geladen in …5
×

Ethnocentrism and relativism

A topic from the curriculum guide for Grade 11 of K to 12

  • Loggen Sie sich ein, um Kommentare anzuzeigen.

Ethnocentrism and relativism

  1. 1. ETHNOCENTRISM AND RELATIVISM 1
  2. 2. ETHNOCENTRISM • is judging another culture solely by the values and standards of one's own culture. 2
  3. 3. • Ethnocentric individuals judge other groups relative to their own ethnic group or culture, especially with concern for language, behavior, customs, and religion. 3
  4. 4. . These ethnic distinctions and subdivisions serve to define each (culture) ethnicity's unique cultural identity. 4
  5. 5. • • According to William G. Sumner, ethnocentrism is defined as the “technical name for the view of things in which one's own group is the center of everything, and all others are scaled and rated with reference to it.” 5
  6. 6. • He further characterized it as often leading to pride, vanity, beliefs of one's own group's superiority, and contempt of outsiders. 6
  7. 7. In the study of Anthropology • Ethnocentric are: People born into a particular culture that grow up absorbing the values and behaviors of the culture will develop a worldview that considers their culture to be the norm. (standard) 7
  8. 8. • If people then experience other cultures that have different values and normal behaviors, they will find that the thought patterns appropriate to their birth culture are not appropriate for the new cultures. 8
  9. 9. • However, since people are accustomed to their birth culture, it can be difficult for them to see the behaviors of people from a different culture from the viewpoint of that culture rather than from their own. 9
  10. 10. • Examples of ethnocentrism include religiocentric constructs claiming a divine association like "divine nation", " One Nation under God", " God's Own Country", " God's Chosen People", and "God's Promised Land“. 10
  11. 11. 11 Cultural Relativism • is the principle that an individual person's beliefs and activities should be understood by others in terms of that individual's own culture.
  12. 12. • It was established as accepted in anthropological research by Franz Boas in the first few decades of the 20th century and later popularized by his students. 12
  13. 13. • Cultural relativism was in part a response to Western ethnocentrism. Ethnocentrism may take obvious forms, in which one consciously believes that one's people's arts are the most beautiful, values the most virtuous, and beliefs the most truthful. 13
  14. 14. • Boas first articulated the idea in 1887: "civilization is not something absolute, but is relative, and our ideas and conceptions are true only so far as our civilization goes.“ However, Boas did not coin the term. 14
  15. 15. Franz Boas, originally trained in physics and geography, argued that one's culture may mediate and thus limit one's perceptions in less obvious ways. 15
  16. 16. He understood "culture" to include not only certain tastes in food, art, and music, or beliefs about religion. He assumed a much broader notion of culture, defined as : 16
  17. 17. • the totality of the mental and physical reactions and activities that characterize the behavior of the individuals composing a social group collectively and individually in relation to their natural environment, to other groups, to members of the group itself, and of each individual to himself. 17
  18. 18. This understanding of culture confronts anthropologists with two problems: •first, how to escape the unconscious bonds of one's own culture, which inevitably bias our perceptions of and reactions to the world, •and second, how to make sense of an unfamiliar culture. 18
  19. 19. GENERALIZATION: • Ethnocentrism – the tendency to assume that one’s own culture and way of life represent the norm or are superior to all others. • Cultural Relativism – the viewing of people’s behavior from the perspective of their own culture. 19

×