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Improving the Patient Experience with HIT Webcast

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Learn how to improve patient experience, weave patient-facing HIT and engagement protocols into your plans, and create a roadmap to improve patient care.

Veröffentlicht in: Gesundheitswesen
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Improving the Patient Experience with HIT Webcast

  1. 1. Beyond Meaningful Use: Enhancing the Patient Experience with HIT Presented By: Mike Elvin, Practice Director, Patient Experience
  2. 2. By the end of this presentation, you will: 1. Understand how patient engagement is linked to the overall patient experience 1. Learn how to design a roadmap for an improved patient experience 1. Learn how to enhance adoption of your patient portal and mHealth options, both publicly and internally
  3. 3. Polling Question #1
  4. 4. Meaningful Use of HIT: What is it?
  5. 5. Meaningful Use of HIT: What Does it Mean? CMS states that Meaningful Use of HIT must: 1.Improve quality, safety, efficiency, and reduce health disparities 2.Engage patients and family. 3.Improve care coordination and population/public health. 4.Maintain privacy and security of patient health information (PHI).
  6. 6. Meaningful Use of HIT: What’s the Focus? Stage One: EMRs Stage Two: Patient Portals, Patient Engagement Stage Three: APIs/apps, Secure Messaging, PGD Where do these technologies fit into the patient experience?
  7. 7. Meaningful Use of HIT: What the End-Game? CMS hopes that Meaningful Use compliance will result in: • Better clinical outcomes • Improved population health outcomes • Increased transparency and efficiency • Empowered individuals • More robust research data on health systems Or, the Triple Aim
  8. 8. Improving the Patient Experience with Patient-Centered HIT • What does patient-centered mean? • What does it look like?
  9. 9. Meaningful Use of HIT: Where do we go from here? • What’s out there? • How can HIT help (or hurt)? • What is patient engagement, exactly? • How does it tie in with patient experience?
  10. 10. HIT: What’s Out There?
  11. 11. HIT: What’s Out There? Examples: EHRs Patient portals Secure messaging APIs & apps Wearables/health trackers and PGD Health information exchanges (HIEs) Patient registration kiosks and interactive patient systems (IPS) Telemedicine Virtual patient navigation Discharge applications Patient education services Patient appointment and waiting room apps Housecall apps Etc.
  12. 12. Polling Question #2
  13. 13. HIT: How Can it Help? Benefits of HIT: HIT
  14. 14. HIT: How Can it Help? Supports Patient Engagement: • Information • Access • Empowerment • Accountability • Action
  15. 15. HIT: How Can it Help? Provider benefits: • Reduction in phone calls to office (up to $6 per call) • 63 cents for each lab result • $17 for every billing query • $7 for every appointment • Asynchronous management = increased productivity + record of communication
  16. 16. HIT: How Can it Hurt? Drawbacks and limitations of HIT: Value Workflow Disruption
  17. 17. HIT: How Can it Help (and Hurt)? Security/Privac y Loss of Personal Touch
  18. 18. HIT and the Patient Experience Patient Experience Definitions: The sum of all interactions shaped by an organization’s culture that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. Providing world-class care while addressing the patient’s physical, educational, emotional, and spiritual needs.
  19. 19. Recent Studies: Patients, Providers, and Emerging HIT • RWJF report • Software Advice study • Xerox/Harris Poll study
  20. 20. Recent Studies: Patients, Providers, and Emerging HIT: RWJF Report • Younger patients are more comfortable with data sharing – while older patients are not. • Seek the stories behind the data. • People also want “long” data, and they want it to move with them. • Give them a roadmap with personal health information and actions to take.
  21. 21. Recent Studies: Patients, Providers, and Emerging HIT: Software Advice Study • 66% don’t have (or don’t know about) their portal • Top frustrations: response and interface • Different ages and genders use portals for different reasons • Advice from S.A.
  22. 22. Recent Studies: Patients, Providers, and Emerging HIT: Xerox/Harris Poll • Nearly half of millennials prefer to access patient portals on their smartphones • Lack of portal awareness • More interested in their personal healthcare since they began using it • Baby boomers: more engaged in their care if their medical information was online
  23. 23. What Health Care Consumerism Means Today • Patient Consumer • PCMHs/ACOs and value-based care • Cost transparency • Accountability
  24. 24. HIT and the Patient Experience Studies have shown that patients want… …more control (even if they’re sharing control). …open lines of communication to their providers. …safety and privacy: a trusting environment. …a roadmap for making good health choices. …encouragement when trying to improve health. …less expensive and more diverse options for care. …to speak in their native language (without jargon). …to be informed about their condition. …their doctors to dress in formal attire. …healthcare to be easy and affordable. …to build a relationship with their caregivers. …to feel cared for.
  25. 25. HIT and the Patient Experience Patient-facing HIT addresses all of these concerns, and more. (Except...)
  26. 26. HIT and the Patient Experience
  27. 27. HIT and the Patient Experience Relationships and the Personal Touch “Touch is our body’s largest and the oldest sense. It’s a channel of communication. It’s integral to the human experience.” - Jeanne AbateMarco, MS, RN, CNS Clinical Nurse Coordinator Department of Integrative Health Programs NYU Langone Medical Center
  28. 28. Hi-Touch/Hi-Tech: Setting the Stage for a Positive Patient Experience • Opening: Introductions, acknowledging others in the room • Attention: Sitting, eye contact, listening, summarizing • Incorporation: turn screen toward patient, portal/apps • Education: Speaking simply, teaching back • SATS, Heard-Head-Heart
  29. 29. How Hospitals Can Weave HIT into the Patient Experience: A Roadmap
  30. 30. How Hospitals Can Weave HIT into the Patient Experience: A Roadmap
  31. 31. How Hospitals Can Weave HIT into the Patient Experience: A Roadmap
  32. 32. How Hospitals Can Weave HIT into the Patient Experience: A Roadmap
  33. 33. How Hospitals Can Weave HIT into the Patient Experience: A Roadmap 1. Audits: Communication/HIT/workflows 2. Vision 3. HIT research/comparison 4. Stakeholders 5. Dovetailing hi-tech and hi-touch: find opportunities 6. Constant contact/workshopping/transparency 7. Education and discharge 8. Focusing on the continuum of care 9. Internal marketing 10.Piloting, shadowing by patient groups 11.External marketing 12.Testing, regrouping 13.Follow-up surveys and tracking
  34. 34. How Hospitals Can Weave HIT into the Patient Experience: Stakeholders • All points of contact! • C-level executive staff • Admitting/Registration • Social Services/Case Management • Inpatient Nursing/Inpatient Therapy Managers • Outpatient Therapy Manager • Radiology • Laboratory • Clinics • Medical Records • Marketing/Public Relations • Food and Environmental Services • Volunteering • Patient advocacy/family faculty groups
  35. 35. How Hospitals Can Weave HIT into the Patient Experience: Discharge and Post-Discharge Plans • Studies: Rehospitalization rates, comprehension • Last point of contact while under your care • Instructions and education for continued health – SSW • Portals/apps/APIs/PGD: Easy access at home • Callbacks
  36. 36.  Collaboration & Workflows  Enhancing Adoption Lessons Learned:
  37. 37. Lessons Learned: Healthy Staff Collaboration and Workflows • Shared ownership • Regular stakeholder meetings and workshops • Value conveyed internally • Seeing patients in new ways: empathy • Happy staff = happy patients • Recognition • Patient advocacy group • Each member of staff plays a part
  38. 38. Lessons Learned: Tips for Introducing Patients to New Technologies and Enhancing Adoption • Incentives • Conveying value • Preferred methods of communication • Not everyone wants to be engaged • Benefits vs. consequences • Adding functionality • Market!
  39. 39. Lessons Learned: Tips for Introducing Patients to New Technologies and Enhancing Adoption • Direct mail • Email/e-newsletters • Website homepage • Phone messaging • Signage • Screensavers • Inpatient televisions • Billing • Smartphone apps/QR codes • Button: “Ask me about our patient portal.”
  40. 40. Polling Question #3
  41. 41. Questions?

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