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2016 leading seagulls 20 icebreakers

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Interecting with Students: Communication problems of Students

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2016 leading seagulls 20 icebreakers

  1. 1. Interacting With Students
  2. 2. GROUP MEMBERS Emrah Öziç Rüveyda Yavuz Buğçe Büçkün Zeynep Merve Demirel Büşra Kutlu Age Average: 22.7 2
  3. 3. Icebreaker Drama Figure 16 3
  4. 4. ICE BREAKERS Figure 1 4
  5. 5. Contents: Literature Review Brain Storming Matrix Diagram Pareto Diagram Problem Definition Fishbone Matrix Diagram Bar Diagram Teacher Family Peer Technology Data Collection and Conclusion Tactics References 5
  6. 6. Literature Review ● The student-teacher relationships affects the attitude of students not only toward the school but also toward the desire of learning. (Christenson, 2007) ● A recent study found that student-teacher relationships throughout elementary school affects the reading achievement of students.(McCormick & O'Connor, 2014). Figure 2 6
  7. 7. Literature Review • The student-teacher relationship affects the classroom environment for students how they feel in it.(Murray & Malmgren, 2005). • Face to face interactions between student and teacher increase the self-confident of students.( O’Connor et al., 2011; Silver et al., 2005) Figure 3 7
  8. 8. Literature Review • Early teacher-student relationships,especially in kindergarten affect academic and social outcomes as well as future academic outcomes and become social people in daily life.(Cataldi & KewallRamani, 2009) • Motivation plays a key role in the relationship between teacher-student for academic outcomes because it is closely linked to student’s perceptions of teacher expectations.(Fan & Willams, 2010) 8 Figure 4
  9. 9. Brain Storming Why do students hesitate to share their problems with their teachers? Why do the teachers respond to the classroom problems aggressively? Why do not teachers share their personal information with students to help them see teachers as real people? Should a teacher be friend or friendly to the students? 1 2 3 4 Figure 5 9
  10. 10. Matrix Diagram Problems Rüveyda 6 3 7 5 Emrah 7 5 2 4 Buğçe 6 4 2 7 Büşra 7 5 3 6 Zeynep 6 3 7 5 Total Point 32 20 21 27 Percentag e 32% 20% 21% 27% Why do students hesitate to share their problems with their teachers? Why do the teachers respond to the classroom problems aggressively? Why do not teachers share their personal information with students to help them see teacher as real people? Should a teacher be friend or friendly to the students? 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 10
  11. 11. Bar Diagram 11
  12. 12. Why we choose this problem • We choose this problem because we want to examine the reasons of students’ hesitation to share their problems with their teachers. This is because the solution of the problem can be investigated in terms of not only teacher and family but also peer and technology. Figure 6 12
  13. 13. Fishbone Why do students hesitate to share their problems with their teachers? Family Teacher Technology Peer experience attitude income ethnicity expectation gender quality problems attitude income internet individualism attitude Figure 7 13
  14. 14. Matrix Diagram Caueses Rüveyda 5 7 4 6 Emrah 6 5 2 7 Buğçe 5 7 6 3 Büşra 5 7 6 4 Zeynep 7 6 4 5 Total Point 28 32 22 25 Percentage 26.1% 29.9% 20.2% 23.3% Family Approach Teacher Peer Technology 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 14
  15. 15. Pareto Diagram 15
  16. 16. • Experienced teachers know how to construct strong relationship with students effectively via their previous experiences. (Nye, Konstantopoulos & Hedges, 2004) • In terms of attitude of teacher, the authoritarian teachers put the pressure on students, so students hesitate to contact with their teachers.(Vohra,2012) Teacher Figure 8 16
  17. 17. • High expectations of teacher affects the relationship between teacher and students negatively because the belief of teacher decreases toward students and also teacher tend to ignore them in the classroom.(Spiegel, 2012) • If ethnicity of the teacher and students does not match, this ethnic imbalance can decrease teacher’s closeness towards students (Hughes, J.,& Kwok, O., 2007) Teacher 17
  18. 18. Figure 9 18 Student (İsmet)- May I see my paper teacher? Teacher- Yes, sure. However, if I had given more grades to you, I will get them back. (FROM THEN ON, İSMET NEVER DEMANDED OR REJECTED ANYTHING.
  19. 19. • Teachers' gender perceptions of students' ability is also reflected in the type of praise and expectations. Teachers often give girls less meaningful and less critical praise than boys.(Liu, 2006) • In terms of quality of teacher, effective teacher arouses more attention of students than non-effective teachers via the some activities in the classroom.( Hamilton, 2012) Teacher 19
  20. 20. •Students from low income have more difficulties to do homework than others because when teacher wants them to design a project ,their parents cannot meet the materials about it,so they feel inadequate toward their teachers and hesitate to connect with them.(Jensen, 2013) Family When the parents fight in the presence of their children,the children behave aggressively in the school toward their teachers or friends.(Yeo, 2015) Figure 10 20
  21. 21. •Children from authoritarian family environment hesitate to connect with their teachers because they assume that all older people are authoritarian including their teachers like their family.( Englehart, 2009) Family Figure 11 21
  22. 22. •Students humiliate while the latter connect with their teachers by ridiculing as ‘looser’.( Becca, 2014) Peer • Students from high income put pressure on students from low income, so the latter withdraw and so do not want to connect with not only their friends but also their teachers. Figure 12 22
  23. 23. •Because of easy accessibility of the Internet everywhere, students do not need to ask a question or interact with their teacher. •Developing technologies and apps leads to socialize people in the artificial world not in the real world because each person know each other from the social networks. Thus, they do not try to communicate face to face. Such individuality is reflected to the relationships between teachers and students(Wellman & Haythornthwaite, 2008). Technology 23
  24. 24. Figure 13 24
  25. 25. Data Collection • Type of data collection: Survey • The survey has been applied to - 52 students - 3 teachers. • Hasan Ali Yücel State School- 8th Grade • Türkan Şoray State School- 5th Grade 25 32 students 20 students
  26. 26. Question 1: How can you define ‘a good teacher’? Teaching good 35% Not beating 29% Fun 15% Kind hearted 15% Smiling 6% Teaching good 29% Not beating 31% Fun 17% Kind hearted 16% Tolerant 7% 5th Grade 8th Grade 26
  27. 27. Question 2: Do you share your happiness or problems with your teacher? Problems 75% Happines s 25% Problems 69% Neither 31% 5th Grade 8th Grade 27
  28. 28. Question 3: Do you hesitate to share your problems with your teacher? 8th Grade Yes 75% No 25% Changes according to problem and teacher 25% Yes 75% 5th Grade 28
  29. 29. Figure 14 29
  30. 30. Question 4: In which situations do you find difficult to share? When somethi ng bad happens 13%Family related 33% Lesson related 27% Personal 27% 5th Grade 8th Grade 30 When something bad happens 42% Personal 33% Lesson related 17% Family related 8%
  31. 31. Question 5: What kind of attitude should your teacher take that you would feel comfortable to share your problems? Kind 67% Solution seeking 25% Cheerful 8% Kind 59%Solution seeking 8% Trustworthy 33% 8th Grade5th Grade 31
  32. 32. Question 6: Can you share your extracurricular problems easily with your teacher? Yes 80% No 20% Yes 40% No 60% 8th Grade5th Grade 32
  33. 33. Question 7: Rank the following in the order of priority that you would share your feeling? 42% 8% 33% 17% Happiness/ Enthusiasm 58%23% 10% 9% Problem/ Trouble 45% 36% 18% 1% Happiness/ Enthusiasm 33% 27% 13% 27% Problem/ Trouble 8th Grade5th Grade Family Friend Class teacher Guidance and psychological counseling Family Friend Class teacher Guidance and psychologica counseling 33
  34. 34. Question 8: Can you contact with your teacher any time you need? Never 0% Rarely 14% Sometim es 22% Usually 32% Always 32% Never 17% Rarely 17% Sometim es 41% Usually 25% Always 0% 5th Grade 8th Grade 34
  35. 35. Figure 15 35
  36. 36. •What kind of problems do your students share with you? •How often do your students communicate with you outside of the class? Questions to teachers •Out of 10 how would you rank the frequency that your students share their problems, happiness, or curricular problems? lesson related 58% family related 25% peer related 17% older grades 75% young er grades 25% 8 100% 36
  37. 37. Conclusion •Although the quality of teacher is an important factor about the relationship between teacher and students, student do not give an adequate importance to this property.They focus on personal characteristics of teacher. (Christenson, 2007) •About the relationship, teacher and student evaluate the type of problems differently. •Although the teacher assumes his/her students consult him/her, from the students point of view this is not the case. (Liu, 2006) 37
  38. 38. Tactics Awareness • Make a student feel he/she is valued and important • Make a student realized that teacher is aware of him/her behaviour, problem, and intention How can you manage this? • Eye-contact • Touch his/her shoulder • Communication outside of the class about extra-curricular topic 38
  39. 39. Tactics Language • Make a student feel he/she is not judged by his/her teacher • Make a student feel his/her character is not critized by his/her teacher. How can you manage this? • Use ‘I language’ • Try not to use ‘but’ • Rather than find a solution, listen him/her completely and guide them to find their own solution 39
  40. 40. Tactics Unity • Make students feel as a part of the classroom. • Make students feel there are not any discriminations in the classroom. How can you manage this? • Teacher and students should prepare ‘Generalizations’ about the classroom together. • Teacher should not focus on students’ success while considering their needs 40
  41. 41. Tactics Peer • Make a student feel comfortable while interacting and communicating with his/her peers. How can you manage this? • Divide students into groups, and time to time change these groups with some different activities. 41
  42. 42. Tactics Instructional approaches • In a classroom, the way of learning can change from one student to another • Also, there can be a student who has a learning disability How can you manage this? • Increasing the variety of instructional approaches rather than direct instruction • Focus on their individuality, not their disability. 42
  43. 43. Gantt Chart Expected Observed Problem definition Brain storming Fish bone Data collection Implementation Tactics 43
  44. 44. Table of Figure •Figure 1: https://s-media-cache- ak0.pinimg.com/736x/7c/e4/80/7ce480e052f285a3a9037562cf00a58c.jpg •Figure 2:http://teducom.com/teducom/images/communication-project-manager.jpg •Figure 3: http://www.summitkids.com/wpcontent/uploads/2015/09/adhd.jpg •Figure 4:https://encrypted- tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTvAZhTTCCPjF6L1u2D8Nh7vAbEmwt- dPQ4aSKt8qYUIkGzVBkufg •Figure 5:https://youthpulseblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/sin- tc3adtulo77.png?w=300&h=251 44
  45. 45. Table of Figure •Figure 6:http://www.charitybags.org.uk/news_and_snippets.shtml •Figure 7: https://encrypted- tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQB9MwZRPeQ1VJux_4_nIAHJaPbnHLgnX HmZECg2bokuxl694j4MA •Figure8:http://www.education.gov.gy/web/media/k2/items/cache/97a935595bd2614586 903fc5e76b1e31_XL.jpg •Figure 9:http://www.karikaturu.com/resimler/notunu-kirarim.jpg •Figure 10:https://www.life360.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/mh_pt_tips.jpg 45
  46. 46. Table of Figure •Figure 11:http://www.dersteknik.com/2011/04/egitimle-ilgili-karikatur-ve- resimler.html •Figure 12:http://www.seninkentin.com/images/userfiles/okul%20(15).jpg •Figure 13: https://hystrygirlteacher.files.wordpress.com201107iphone-app- cartoon.jpg •Figure 14:http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1cOPxs9V34I/UupUYTW- ffI/AAAAAAAAABw/oEViIMsFgVw/s1600/ben-anlamadim-ogretmenim-vay- gerizekali.jpg •Figure 15: https://myenglishexpressions.files.wordpress.com2015091-62.png 46
  47. 47. Table of Figure •Figure16:https://www.google.com.tr/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=image s&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjN4Puqq9XLAhVCVxQKHeNSCpo QjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fcornerstone- academy.org%2Fdrama%2F&psig=AFQjCNFeT0leXcdLW0LMqA7IcwkEGG5 t-A&ust=1458757047533434 •Figure 17: http://www.outandsoberminnesota.org/wp- content/uploads/2015/10/thank-you.jpg 47
  48. 48. References: • İmece Circles Training, Dr. Hayal Köksal • Becca, M. (2014). The Effects of Peer Pressure within Students. Journal of Education and Learning, 36-42. • Cataldi, E. F., & KewallRamani, A. (2009). Friendships of Students and Teachers. American Educational Research Journal, 23-29. • Christenson, P. (2007). Psychology of Adolescent. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 42-48. • Engleheart, N. (2009). The Effect of Family Environment on Student. The Educational Research, 56-62. 48
  49. 49. •Fan, W., & Williams, C. (2010). The Effects of Parental Involvement on Student's Academic Achievement. European Journal of Education, 18-24. •Hamilton, M. (2012). Characteristics of Effective Teacher. Journal of European Education, 29-36. •Hughes, J., & Oyadomari, K. (2007). Teacher-Student Response. Journal of Educational Research, 56-60. •Jensen, C. (2013). The Impact of Poverty on Educational Outcomes. American Educational Research Journal, 28-29. •Yeo, J. (2015). SchoolBag. Retrieved from When Family Problems Affect Children in School : https://www.schoolbag.sg/story/when-family- problems-affect-children-in-school#.VvGDSyQ5l9B 49
  50. 50. •Liu, H. (2006). Teacher and the Gender Gaps in Student Achievement. Cambridge Journal of Education, 28-37. •Murray, C., & K, G. (2005). The Effects of Teacher-Student Relationships: Social and Academic Outcomes of Low-Income Middle and High School Students. Retrieved from Department of Applied Psychology: http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/appsych/opus/issues/2013/fall/murray,malmgren •Nye, B., Konstantopoulos, S., & Hedges, L. (2004). How are Teachers' Effects? Journal of Education, 25-31. •Wellman, B., & Haythornthwaite, C. (2008). The Internet in Everyday Life. US: John Wiley & Sons. 50
  51. 51. •O’Connor, E.E., Cappella, E., McCormick, M.P. (2014). Enhancing the academic development of shy children: A test of the efficacy of INSIGHTS. School Psychology Review, 43(3), 239-259 •O'Connor et al. (2011); Silver et al., (2015). Teacher- student relationship. Retrieved from https://my-learning.me/2014/08/05/teacher- student-relationships/ •Spiegel, C. (2012). Springer Link. Retrieved from Teacher Expectation and Labeling: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-0-387-73317- 3_43#page-1 •Vohra, R. (2012). The Behaviour of Teacher. Journal of Teacher Education, 65-69. 51
  52. 52. Figure 17 52
  53. 53. SPECIAL THANKS TO HAYAL KÖKSAL 53

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