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PR: Norwegian Court of Appeals Confirm Legality of Transport Sharing App Haxi

A Norwegian appeals court upheld today a lower court ruling that transportation sharing app Haxi does not classify as a professional taxi servie. According to the court’s ruling, police officers in the city of Stavanger have acted improperly by charging the Haxi drivers for operating taxis without a permit.

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PR: Norwegian Court of Appeals Confirm Legality of Transport Sharing App Haxi

  1. 1. 15.02.2016  Norwegian Court of Appeals Confirm Legality of transport sharing app Haxi _____________________________________ Feb 15, 2016 - Gultating Court of Appeal, Stavanger A Norwegian appeals court upheld today a lower court ruling that transportation sharing app Haxi does not classify as a professional taxi servie. According to the court’s ruling, police officers in the city of Stavanger have acted improperly by charging the Haxi drivers for operating taxis without a permit. “We are very pleased that the appeals judge upheld the earlier court’s decision. Although we expected the confirmation that using Haxi to share transportation is legal, it is a relief for the drivers in Stavanger that the case is now finally closed. We are looking into ways that we can help the drivers seek reparation for damages incurred by the Stavanger police in bringing suit against the drivers” says Aleksander Soender, co-founder of Haxi. Between Sep and Nov in 2015, 8 private car owners in the city of Stavanger were stopped by police and charged for operating illegal “pirate taxis”. Police removed the cars’ license plates and issued a fine of 8 000 Norwegian kroner (€840). The drivers’ refused to pay the fines and allowed the case to go to court, arguing that Haxi does not qualify as a taxi service in legal terms. The drivers argued that Haxi is a way of connecting them to people who need transport and that they can provide it directly. It is therefore not solicitation of passengers in a public space, and not an activity requiring a cab permit. “People are seeking alternatives to the traditional taxi monopolies and Haxi is rapidly growing across the Nordics, purely by word-of-mouth. This case sets a precedent that we hope other countries will look to, and we hope it will help clear up the confusion surrounding the legality of sharing apps. There is no longer any doubt that Haxi is legal, and we expect it to explode in popularity now” says Soender. The Haxi app is free and users connect by sending “shout outs” to drivers nearby who will give them a ride. Unlike its competitor Uber, Haxi does not determine tariff rates, drivers and passengers are free to decide how they will share costs. About Haxi Haxi is a lifestyle and technology company developing a user friendly service for transport sharing. Based in Scandinavia, Haxi’s core team is made up of designers at heart, focused on bringing new design-based solutions to transport sharing. The free Haxi app was launched in Stavanger, Norway in 2014 and today it’s the leading service in Scandinavia for short distance transport sharing with over 7.000 active drivers serving thousands of passengers every week. Haxi is backed by private investors. Press Contact: For more information, to request an interview with Haxi leadership, please contact Aleksander Soender, +4526160630 aleksander@haxi.me Website & Apps: Web: ​https://haxi.no/ iPhone: ​https://goo.gl/s6ou8u Android: ​https://goo.gl/9PJm7Z Social Media: https://twitter.com/haxi https://instagram.com/haxi https://fb.com/haxiofficial  

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