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The Roaring 20's 5P Project: Grace Berkel

Welcome to the Roaring Twenties!

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The Roaring 20's 5P Project: Grace Berkel

  1. 1. ● The Roaring Twenties refers to the decade of the 1920’s in Western society or Western Culture. ● It was a period in history of dramatic social and political change. ● It was the coming of a new America. People began to ask questions and began to rebel. ● Mass culture played the biggest factor during this time. ● The Roaring 20’s influenced the world as we know it today. THE ROARING 20’S
  2. 2. CHANGING WAYS OF LIFE ● During the 1920’s, urbanization began to accelerate. ● For the first time, more Americans lived in cities than on farms. ● New York was a home to over 5 million people, and Chicago was around 3 million. ● For small town immigrants, adapting to urban environment demanded changes in thinking and everyday living. ● Americans found themselves caught up between the two. A tug of what seemed to be safe, a small town with closed ties, hard work and strict morals against a big city of anonymous crowds, and moneymakers.
  3. 3. URBAN VS. RURAL ● More liberal, experienced, freedom to new ways, more modern lifestyle. ● Supported prohibition (drinking alcohol) ● Combined religion with science, school became required and more advanced ● Safe, personal ties, morals, hard work, traditionalists ● Strongly opposed prohibition ● Less effect on modern ideas, evangelical religion, kids worked on farm instead of attending school
  4. 4. PROHIBITION ● During the 20’s, some freedoms were expanded while others were curtailed. ● The 18th amendment declared in 1919, it banned all manufacturing and sale of “intoxicating liquors.” ● January 16, 1920, the federal Volstead Act closed every bar, tavern, and saloon in the United States. ● This drove the liquor trade underground where it was controlled by bootleggers and organized-crime figures.
  5. 5. SUPPORT FOR PROHIBITION ● Reformers had long believed alcohol led to crime, child and wife abuse, and accidents. ● Supporters were largely from rural South and West. ● The church affiliated Anti- Saloon League and the Women’s Christian Temperance Union helped push the 18th amendment through. ● Despite the new legislation, Prohibition was difficult to enforce. ● The increase of illegal production and sale of liquor led to waning support of the prohibition by the end of the 1920’s.
  6. 6. SPEAKEASIES & BOOTLEGGERS ● The word, Bootlegging, apparently came into general use in the Midwest in the 1880s to denote the practice of concealing flasks of illicit liquor in boot tops when going to trade with Native Americans. It is now used to define the action of manufacturing or distributing alcohol. ● A speakeasy is an establishment where alcohol was sold and drank illegally. People would go to underground bars in order to drink. ● The most well known bootlegger is named Al Capone. He was an American gangster and businessman who is also known as “Scarface.” ● Capone organized a gang with a large amount of people who would illegally sell alcohol, such as moonshine. ● Moonshine remains illegal to this day because it is made outside of a registered distillery.
  7. 7. GOVERNMENT FAILS TO CONTROL ALCOHOL ● Eventually, prohibitions fate was sealed by the government, which failed to budget enough money to enforce the law. ● The task of enforcing prohibition fell to 1,500 poorly paid federal agents. ● With the supply of alcohol from the mafia led to a rise in organized crime that government could not overcome. ● While prohibition reformers envisioned improvements to society through the elimination of alcohol, instead, unforeseen consequences of the law led to its downfall. ● Almost immediately, they started to see people with an appetite and an interest in alcohol trying anything to get it.
  8. 8. THE 20’S WOMEN ● The 1920’s was the biggest change for the life of a women. ● Within this decade women were given the freedom of making their own decisions for themselves. ● They were able to vote, drink, drive, express themselves in any way they want, choice of birth control, and more. ● Many thought that this was dangerous and didn’t think it was right for women to have the same rights as a man. ● They believed a women was meant to stay at home, make babies, and do chores, and were expected to not question it. ● Women saw this issue and wanted better for the future of a woman.
  9. 9. NEW ROLES FOR WOMEN ● They could vote at last: The 19th amendment to the constitution had guaranteed that right in 1920. ● During World War I, women entered the workforce in large numbers. ● Millions of women would work in white-collar jobs and could afford to participate in burgeoning consumer economy. ● Margaret Sanger made strides in providing contraception to women, sparking a wave of women’s rights to birth control. ● The growth of automobiles increased due to the lowering prices making it more accessible for women to drive as well.
  10. 10. THE FLAPPER ● The most familiar symbol of the Roaring Twenties is probably the flapper. ● a young woman, with bobbed hair, and short skirts that drank, smoked, and said what might be termed “unladylike” things in order to be more sexually “free.” ● They were known for their energetic freedom, embracing a lifestyle viewed by many at the time as outrageous, immoral, or downright dangerous. ● They pushed barriers in economic, political, and sexual freedom. ● They expressed themselves through fashion, wearing designer and bling everywhere.. They also said goodbye to corsets and hello to bras.
  11. 11. PARTIES ● Parties were extremely popular in the 20’s. They held many “rent parties” that is a social occasion where tenants would hold large parties in order to raise money to avoid eviction. ● These parties also helped the growth and development of jazz as a music genre. ● These parties were very extravagant with champagne, and glitter everywhere. ● Parties were the place for flappers where they would dance all night and giving a show as well. ● They would have live performers playing music for the party.
  12. 12. THE CHANGING FAMILY ● Urban life is much different than living in rural. The children had worked in jobs in the city such as, selling newspapers, shining shoes, or in factories. ● For leisure time, city families had better access to movie theaters, or they would listen to the radio at home. ● There was a decrease in births due to the influence of contraceptives. Women were given the choice when and when not to have a baby. ● School was mandatory for children to attend where as in rural areas children would work on the farm. ● The town and workforces took on a more diverse look during the 1920’s.
  13. 13. SCIENCE & RELIGION ● The religious party believed that every one person on earth was put here by one superior being. They also believed that anyone who didn’t believe would go to “hell.” ● Now for the scientific party, they believed that there was, and is a logical explanation for everything. For example the topic of were we (humans) came from, the scientists believed that, thanks to Darwin's theory of evolution, humans came from monkeys. ● They thought that without science we would never understand the world. ● These different point of views started a riot as well as accusations against scientists who wanted to educate others on evolution. ● The debate over evolution, and whether an irreconcilable divide existed between religion and science, had raged long before John Scopes entered the classroom, and continues to this day.
  14. 14. SCOPES TRIAL ● The Scopes Trial, also known as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was the 1925 prosecution of science teacher John Scopes for teaching evolution in Tennessee public school, which a recent bill made illegal. ● Scopes wasn’t clear on whether he had precisely taught the subject, but was sure he used materials that included evolution. ● He taught physics and math, and while he said he accepted evolution, he never taught biology. ● It was announced to newspapers the next day that Scopes had been charged with violating the Butler Act, and the town wired the ACLU to procure its services. ● The trial was viewed as an opportunity to challenge the constitutionality of the bill, to publicly advocate the legitimacy of Darwin’s theory of evolution, and to enhance of American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).
  15. 15. EDUCATION & POPULAR CULTURE ● Developments in education had a powerful impact on the nation. ● Enrollment is high schools quadrupled between 1914 and 1926. ● Public schools met the challenge of educating millions of immigrants. ● The 1920’s pop culture was a crazy and bizarre mix of sports, events, economy and spectacles. ● One thing that shaped the 20’s was the the 20’s car. People could go where they wanted, when they wanted. ● The automobile were a symbol of independence more than the fashions, the jazz, the booze, because they made those things possible.
  16. 16. ● Although radio transmissions were broadcast as early as 1912, commercially licensed radio broadcasting in the U.S. didn’t start until 1920. ● Crystal radios came out first and required earphones to listen. Newspaper businesses feared that radio would replace them so they started radio stations like KDKA. ● Radio broadcasts included news, music, sports, weather, lectures, and stock market activity. ● No longer did anyone have to wait to read about events in the newspaper. ● By the end of 1922, there were over 500 radio stations across the U.S. RADIO COMES OF AGE
  17. 17. THE JAZZ AGE ● One notable event was the introduction of a new music genre and dance styles, Jazz, in 1922. The radio played a big part on the growth and development of this genre. ● Originating in New Orleans as a fusion of African and European music, jazz played a significant part in wider cultural changes in this period, and its influence on pop culture continued long afterwards. ● The Jazz Age was an era for the youth. Young people used jazz and fashion to rebel against the tradition of culture of previous generations. ● It led to the creation of new dances such as the One Step, the Charleston, and the Black Bottom. ● Benny Goodman, Fats Waller and Louis Armstrong were among the most famous people that defined the Jazz era. It was the soundtrack of the twenties.
  18. 18. AMERICAN HEROES OF THE 20’S ● Gertrude Ederle was a champion swimmer by her late teens, and competed in the 1924 Olympics. ● Babe Ruth was known for his many baseball records, but he was most widely known for his 714 home runs for the New York, Yankees. ● Amelia Earhart was the first woman to ever fly the Atlantic Ocean. ● Years before her mission she broke many records. ● She unfortunately did not come back from her trip.
  19. 19. ● Charles Lindbergh became an instant American hero and one of the 20th’s Century’s first international superstars for his nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean. ● Charles piloted the Spirit of St. Louis down the dirt runway of Roosevelt Field in New York on May 20, 1927. ● Many doubted he would successfully cross the Atlantic Ocean. ● Yet he landed safely in Paris less than 34 hours later changing history as we know it. ● He changed the public opinion on the value of air travel, and laid a foundation for the future development of aviation. LINDBERGH’S FLIGHT
  20. 20. ● After World War I, the American economy boomed, and young people embraced more modern lifestyles. ● This arts responded to all of these trends. During this time, the theater became fertile ground for exploring serious issues. ● Many films concentrated on the new attitudes about morality and the effects on traditional domestic lifestyles. ● The most dramatic change in motion picture was the growth of “silent films” to “talking pictures.” ● An example would be the infamous Three Stooges which is still very well known today. ENTERTAINMENT & ARTS
  21. 21. ● Famed composer George Gershwin merged traditional elements with American Jazz. ● Painters like Edward Hopper depicted the loneliness of American life. ● Georgia O’Keeffe captured the grandeur of New York using intensely colored canvases. ● There were two important art movements in this decade: Surrealism and Art Deco. ● Although jazz was very popular, the 1920’s were broadway’s prime years. There were over 50 musicals opening in just one season. MUSIC & ART
  22. 22. ● Reading was popular in the 1920’s as more and more became literate. ● Before the radio and television, people got their facts from reading newspapers, magazines, or books. ● Authors started to win Nobel Prizes for their work. ● Important authors of the decade included F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dorothy Parker, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and more. ● F. Scott Fitzgerald was a popular novelist best known for his novel The Great Gatsby. He spoke of the negative side of the period’s “gaiety and freedom.” WRITERS IN THE 20’S
  23. 23. ● The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930’s, beginning in the U.S. ● It lasted until the late 1930’s, it was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. ● It caused drastic declines in output, severe unemployment, and acute deflation in almost every country of the world. ● The fundamental cause of the Great Depression in the U.S. was a decline in spending, which led to a decline in production. ● The 1920’s was not an exceptional boom period; prices had remained constant throughout the decade. THE GREAT DEPRESSION
  24. 24. ● I believe the 20’s was the most influential decade in history. It was the first time society went against tradition and people began to make their own decisions and having their own thoughts. ● This decade brought us everything we know today. Women were given the right to vote, prohibition failed, and media and technology began to spike. Which changed our world forever. ● Many legacies of important people live on from this decade and are remembered forever. ● Although it is known as the “Roaring Twenties,” it came with many issues. 100 years later, it is now 2020. People began this year thinking it would be the “Roaring Twenties,” but like history it came with much more than just fun. I wonder what the world will be like in 2120. CONCLUSION
  25. 25. Works Cited Billings, Sean. “Why Prohibition Failed.” Newsweek, Newsweek, 24 Jan. 2019, www.newsweek.com/why-prohibition-failed-100-anniversary-18th-amendment- 1292923. “Charles Lindbergh's Transatlantic Flight.” Enoch Pratt Free Library, www.prattlibrary.org/research/guides/primary-sources-throughout-history/charles- lindberghs-transatlantic-flight. History.com Editors. “Scopes Trial.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 17 Nov. 2017, www.history.com/topics/roaring-twenties/scopes-trial. History.com Editors. “The Roaring Twenties History.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 14 Apr. 2010, www.history.com/topics/roaring-twenties/roaring-twenties- history. Lee, Karen. “Jazz Age - Topics on Newspapers.com.” Topics, 17 July 2020, www.newspapers.com/topics/roaring-twenties/jazz-age/. Hernandez, Paul “The Roaring Twenties: Overview.” NIST, 27 Mar. 2019, www.nist.gov/history/nist-100-foundations-progress/roaring-twenties-overview. SOURCES
  26. 26. THANKS FOR LISTENING!

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  • giusigualtieri54

    Mar. 14, 2021

Welcome to the Roaring Twenties!

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