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How to Measure the Positive Impact on Biodiversity of an Investment?

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How to Measure the Positive Impact on Biodiversity of an Investment?

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Presented by Caroline van Leenders (LNV/RVO), Wijnand Broer (CREM), Roel Nozeman (ASN Bank) and Sylvia Wisniwski (Finance in Motion)
https://events.globallandscapesforum.org/agenda/luxembourg-2019/how-to-measure-the-positive-impact-on-biodiversity-of-an-investment/

Presented by Caroline van Leenders (LNV/RVO), Wijnand Broer (CREM), Roel Nozeman (ASN Bank) and Sylvia Wisniwski (Finance in Motion)
https://events.globallandscapesforum.org/agenda/luxembourg-2019/how-to-measure-the-positive-impact-on-biodiversity-of-an-investment/

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How to Measure the Positive Impact on Biodiversity of an Investment?

  1. 1. How to Measure the Positive Impact on Biodiversity of an Investment? GLF Luxembourg 2019, November 30th 14:00 - 15:15 UTC – Salle E Caroline van Leenders (LNV/RVO) Wijnand Broer (CREM) Roel Nozeman (ASN Bank) Sylvia Wisniwski (Finance in Motion)
  2. 2. Timetable • 14:00 – 14:15 Introduction by Caroline van Leenders on the state of affairs with biodiversity in the financial sector • 14:15 – 14:40 Wijnand Broer and Roel Nozeman on biodiversity positive investments & footprinting and practical example of ASN bank • 14:40 – 14:55 Sylvia Wisniwski from Finance in Motion on a practical example of biodiversity conservation through an impact fund • 14:55 – 15:15 Interactive discussion
  3. 3. Landscapes and Dutch government: • African Landscape Action Plan • The LIFT tool • Green bond for landscape restoration Landscape approach for biodiversity • Finance For One Planet
  4. 4. Climate change is the trojan horse
  5. 5. Difference climate and biodiversity 1. Awareness: hurricanes and fires 2. Ambition: a goal on temperature 3. Methodologies: carbon measuring 4. Scale: global
  6. 6. Usual way of thinking about the relation between financial institutions and ecosystems Source: Finance for One Planet, RVO 2016
  7. 7. Reversing it leads to a new paradigm on time and scale Source: Finance for One Planet, RVO 2016
  8. 8. Important milestone: 2020 super year for biodiversity • Include non-state actors • Possible commitments for financials:  Articulate ambition for biodiversity  Publicly report on biodiversity impact  Develop action plans for biodiversity  Apply Natural Capital thinking  Support a Task Force Nature related Financial Disclosure  Endorse the New York Forest Declaration, the AgWater Challenge and the New Plastic Economy  And more… • Landscape approach is missing in CBD
  9. 9. sli.do Multiple Choice: Who is in the room? a. Government b. Financial sector c. Landscape organization / NGO d. Consultant e. Student f. Other Open question: What do you expect to learn? Word Cloud: What is a key term you associate with the financial sector?
  10. 10. • 3 pillars: Climate, Human rights and Biodiversity • Cooperation in platforms and methodology development • Long term goals ASN Bank & Sustainability
  11. 11. • In 2014: Vision for Biodiversity at ASN Bank in 2030 • Where to start? Stakeholder consultation • Development and testing of BFFI methodology: a Pilot footprint • Long term goal The biodiversity footprint of a financial institution (BFFI)
  12. 12. 7 & 8 November 2019 #BusinessNatureSummit Finance target
  13. 13. Multipe choice sli.do Target setting: • Should a financial institution set audacious goals regarding impact on biodiversity or wait with this until the data and methodology is fully developed? • Set aspirational goals and learn by doing • Wait until better data and methodology is fully developed
  14. 14. • PCAF now adopted by 57 financial institutions with total financial assets of $3.5 trillion • In 2020 ASN Bank and others will start PBAF (Partnership for Biodiversity Accounting Financials): The first focus will be on positive impacts on biodiversity. Interested? Contact: roel.nozeman@asnbank.nl
  15. 15. Biodiversity Footprint Financial Institutions (BFFI)
  16. 16. Multipe choice sli.do • Biodiversity footprinting is necessary to identify and manage trade-offs from an investment strategy based on carbon alone. • Agree • Disagree
  17. 17. From a footprint towards a net gain
  18. 18. The mitigation Hierarchy Exclusion Investment criteria Impact investing
  19. 19. Positive impacts on biodiversity • What is a biodiversity positive investment? An investment resulting in: ….an increase in biodiversity (e.g. restoration)? ….reduction of negative impact (e.g. good agricultural practices)? ….avoidance of a negative impact (e.g. green energy)? • Can all of these be used to reach a not-net-loss or net-gain? • Positive compared to what? Positive impacts in the BFFI
  20. 20. Positive impacts on biodiversity Use of what is already out there BBOP, GIIN / IRIS+, CPIC, UNEP-FI, PCAF, STAR, etc. How can this be used to: • define biodiversity positive impacts • measure or calculate impact • integrate this in the biodiversity footprint financial institutions • reach a common ground Identify follow-up steps
  21. 21. Positive impacts on biodiversity Investments with the aim to contribute to (‘impact investing’): • Investments in the enhancement of existing biodiversity • Investments in the restoration of biodiversity to a specific prior state • Reduced negative impacts on biodiversity by addressing one or more of the drivers of biodiversity loss of existing economic activities (how to deal with certification?) • Avoided negative impacts on biodiversity by addressing ‘green’ energy or resources, alternative livelihoods (preventing biodiversity loss) or known future risks to biodiversity • Investment criteria & Engagement
  22. 22. Multipe choice sli.do • Investments that include independent and biodiversity relevant standards in their investment criteria (e.g. FSC, MSC, RFA) should be rewarded for this in calculating a biodiversity footprint, even if impact-data for these standards are still lacking. • Agree • Disagree
  23. 23. Some recommendations • Investments in a reduction/avoidance of negative impact  no net loss • Investments in an increase in biodiversity  net-gain • Positive impacts from certifications like FSC preferably included in the footprint, even if data are still lacking • Different types of positive impact should be reported separately • Negative impacts and positive impacts should be reported separately https://www.government.nl/documents/rep orts/2019/09/25/report-positive-impacts- in-the-biodiversity-footprint-financial- institutions
  24. 24. biodiversity conservation through an impact fund The eco.business Fund Luxemburg, 30 November 2019
  25. 25. About the eco.business Fund 01
  26. 26. •The eco.business Fund aims at promoting business and consumption practices that contribute to biodiversity conservation and the sustainable use of natural resources through the provision of dedicated financing and technical assistance. Finance for Biodiversity Conservation The eco.business Fund
  27. 27. Flow of Funds Financial Institutions Donors Dedicated Financing Funding Direct Investments Sponsoring Technical Assistance Target Group Real-Sector Intermediaries1 Investors 1 Only applicable to the eco.business Sub-Fund for sub-Saharan Africa
  28. 28. 1 Additional countries to become eligible in phase 2 for eco.business Sub-Saharan Africa Chilean Winter Rainfall-Valdivian Forests Tropical Andean Tumbes-Choco Mesoamerican Caribbean Islands Cerrado Atlantic Forest Guinean Forests of West Africa Succulent Karoo Madagascar and the Indian Ocean Islands Horn of Africa Cape Floristic Region Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Eastern Afromontane Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa Countries of focus Additional eligible countries1 Biodiversity hotspots Countries not eligible Approach to Impact: Regional Focus • Biodiversity hotspots are highly biodiverse ​areas endangered by human activity. • These areas host a vast amount ​of irreplaceable, endemic species not ​found anywhere else in the world.​
  29. 29. Sustainable Forestry Sustainable Tourism Sustainable Agriculture and Agri-processing Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Approach to impact: Sectoral focus eco.business Fund Priority Sectors The eco.business Fund aims at focusses on those economic sectors that are highly consumptive of natural resources – and affected by climate change.
  30. 30. “Green List” Activities Follow good practices and investment guidelines that have a significant positive impact on conservation and are included on the fund’s “Green List” Approach to impact: Eligibility Criteria for the Final Target Group Selected Projects Non-standardized measures with a high impact on biodiversity conservation, the sustainable use of natural resources and climate change mitigation and adaptation Corporate Sustainability Standards1 Meet the eligible sustainable production and sourcing standards from international commodity purchasers End borrowers must meet at least one of the criteria below Voluntary Sustainability Standards Hold one of the more than 30 certifications for sustainable production approved by the fund, e.g. Rainforest Alliance, Forest Stewardship Council, etc. 1 Applicable to the eco.business Sub-Fund for sub-Saharan Africa only; Eligibility dependent upon approval by fund
  31. 31. •Maximizing and deepening the impact through customised capacity building and consulting services, including on: • Improving environmental and social risk management • Developing impact management systems • Enhancing monitoring systems (including through satellite) • Training loan officers on sustainable lending practices • Working with producers to equip them with tools to enhance sustainability of their operation Approach to impact: Building Capacities
  32. 32. Growing Impact 02
  33. 33. impact Pathway Biodiversity Conservation Sustainable Use of Natural Resources Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Socio-Economic Improvements Final Impact Impact on Investment and Production Environment Activities Promote Change in Practices of Financial Institutions Promote Change in Business and Production Practices Facilitate an Enabling Environment for a Greener Economy Provide Dedicated Funding Provide Technical Assistance Stakeholder Dialogue and Cooperation Contribution to SDGs Raise Public and Private Capital
  34. 34. Impact assessment Approach Impact assessment is a key component of our work. The fund combines a range of data sources to track progress against its key performance indicators. eco.business Fund Sub-loan Data & Fund Monitoring Third Party Evidence (incl. VSS) Assessing Impact Impact Claims Field Visits eco.business Fund Case Studies
  35. 35. •The eco.business Fund utilizes two indi cators to assess its contribution to the preservation of ecosystems and biodiversity: i. the hectares of agroforestry supported as a proxy indicator for biodiversity- rich areas ii. a biodiversity score as an average measure of the biodiversity present in the farms and forestry plantations supported by the fund, relative to the biodiversity present in pristine ecosystems Focus: Assessing Contribution to Biodiversity Conservation
  36. 36. • Casal is a 255 hectares family-run coffee farm and mill in El Salvador receiving financing from Banco Hipotecario to modernize its ecological coffee mill and to renovate its plantations of shade grown coffee. • In El Salvador, where native forests represent only 2% of the territory, coffee forests are one of the few remaining refuges for biodiversity. • The presence of wild frogs, tiger cats, deer and foxes on Casal’s plantations provides concrete evidence of the benefits of this agroforestry system. • Through the fund’s promotion of shade-grown coffee, farms like Casal are supported to preserve biodiversity in coffee producing regions. Example: Preserving ecosystems and biodiversityCasal, a Sustainable Coffee Plantation and Mill in El Salvador
  37. 37. •Measuring environmental impact and promoting a sustainable coffee sector through technology, including through • Strengthening environmental monitoring of production practices using drones, satellite images, and soil analysis • Improving the risk scoring system by including environmental variables in the evaluation. • Identifying activities that could reduce the risk of extinction of endangered species on coffee farms, via the IUCN Biodiversity Return on Investment Metric methodology Example: Supporting Financial Institutions Strengthening biodiversity monitoring at Banco Hipotecario
  38. 38. Initiated by Thank you for your attention
  39. 39. Final Environmental and socio-economic impact 159,000 hectares of farm land under sustainable management 5.5 million tons of absolute CO2 stock maintained by agroforestry and forestry systems 4.2 million cubic meters of irrigation water saved 280,000 direct jobs supported 69,210 m3 liquid waste treated or recycled 30,000 liters of herbicide use avoided 81,000 hectares of farmland under soil conservation practices 471 hectares of soil erosion avoided Since its inception in December 2014, the eco.business Fund has contributed to: All figures as of 30.06.2019 based on eco.business Fund activities in Latin America
  40. 40. Multipe Choice sli.do a. Only direct investments: direct investments which contribute to more biodiversity (for example: landscape restoration) b. Direct investments + direct reduction: investments in the reduction of negative impacts (for example: pro-biodiversity investments in agriculture) c. Direct investments + direct reduction, and indirect reduction: investments with an indirect reduction of negative impacts (for example: investing in green energy)
  41. 41. Thank you! Any questions left? Please ask!
  42. 42. The information in this document is marketing material and does not constitute investment, legal, tax or any other advice. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial and other circumstances of persons who receive it. This document does not necessarily deal with every important topic or cover every aspect of the topics with which it deals. The Funds mentioned in this presentation are specialized investment funds governed by Luxembourg law and are reserved for institutional, professional or other well-informed investors as defined by Luxembourg law. The issue documents or the assets held in the Funds have, however, not been approved or disapproved by any authority. The information given herein constitutes neither an offer nor a solicitation of any action based on it, nor does it constitute a commitment of the Fund to offer its shares and/or notes to any investor. No guarantee is given as to the completeness, timeliness or adequacy of the information provided herein. No investment may be made except upon the basis of the current issue documents of the Funds, which are obtainable free of charge from Finance in Motion GmbH (Carl-von-Noorden-Platz 5, 60596 Frankfurt, Germany). All forward-looking statements have been compiled on a best efforts basis, taking into account multiple variables which may be subject to change, including, without limitation, exchange rates, general developments in banking markets and regulations, interest rate benchmarks, and others. Actual developments could differ from the expectations expressed in forward-looking statements. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results. Prices of shares and the income from them may fall or rise and investors may not get back the amount originally invested. Neither the Funds nor Finance in Motion GmbH are under no obligation to update or alter such forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise. Neither the Funds nor Finance in Motion GmbH nor any of their shareholders, directors, officers, employees, advisors or agents makes any representation or warranty or gives any undertaking of any kind, express or implied, or, to the extent permitted by applicable law, assumes any liability of any kind whatsoever, as to the timeliness, adequacy, correctness, completeness or suitability for any investor of any opinions, forecasts, projections, assumptions and any other information contained in, or otherwise in relation to, this document or assumes any undertaking to supplement any such information as further information becomes available or in light of changing circumstances. The content of this information is subject to change without prior notice. Any views expressed in this document reflect the current views of the author(s) which do not necessarily correspond to the views of the Funds, their shareholders and/or their service providers. Views expressed may change without notice and may differ from views set out in other documents, including other research published by the Funds, their shareholders and/or their service providers. No liability for correctness, completeness, accuracy etc. Not for distribution in or into the United States of America, Canada, Japan or Australia or to any U.S. person or in any other jurisdiction in which such distribution would be prohibited by applicable law. © Finance in Motion GmbH 2019. All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER 43 |

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Question 1: Who is in the room?

    Question 2: What do you expect to learn?

    Question 3: What is a key term you associate with the financial sector?
  • LT doel, opensource, geen databases die blackbox zijn! Samenwerking met andere fi’s, ngo’s en andere stakeholders. en open source
  • We started developing the methodology together with the help of scientists and external consultants in 2014. Outside in>what does society need. Exploring the field, talked with many stakeholders. Looked at methods out there and what reference we should use: planetary boundaries, government policies, SDG’s etc. We did a pilot calculation and after this had a number of stakeholder meeting with different ngo’s like WWF, IUCN, Natuur & Milieu etc After this initial phase we further developed the methodology.
  • Question 4: Should a financial institution set audacious goals regarding impact on biodiversity or wait with this until the data and methodology is fully developed?
  • We started developing the methodology together with the help of scientists and external consultants in 2014. Outside in>what does society need. Exploring the field, talked with many stakeholders. Looked at methods out there and what reference we should use: planetary boundaries, government policies, SDG’s etc. We did a pilot calculation and after this had a number of stakeholder meeting with different ngo’s like WWF, IUCN, Natuur & Milieu etc After this initial phase we further developed the methodology.
  • Question 5: Biodiversity footprinting is necessary to identify and manage trade-offs from an investment strategy based on carbon alone.
  • Question 6: Investments that include independent and biodiversity relevant standards in their investment criteria (e.g. FSC, MSC, RFA) should be rewarded for this in calculating a biodiversity footprint, even if impact-data for these standards are still lacking.
  • Question 7: Which measures for biodiversity can be included in calculating a net-positive impact on biodiversity?

    Question 8: What is necessary to increase involvement of the financial sector?

    Question 9: What was the highlight/eyeopener of this session for you?

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