Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Nächste SlideShare
Cinta indonesia
Cinta indonesia
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 2 Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Anzeige

NIEAngola15-16

  1. 1. A HERALD-TRIBUNE MEDIA GROUP NEWSPAPER-IN-EDUCATION PUBLICATION LOOKING FOR ANGOLA 15 R ivers were one of the few permanent markers of the wild Florida terrain crossed by freedom seekers in the early nineteenth century. And it was permanence Dr. Coz Cozzi was looking for, in his survey of the Manatee River this past spring. In spite of the passage of 186 years from the abandonment of Angola after the raid of 1821, the “Looking for Angola” team hoped to find some remnants of the people who made a living on the banks of the Manatee River. Allies from the War of 1812, British Filibusters most likely traded with the people of Angola and therefore, sailed their ships down the Manatee River. Likewise, the Spanish, the sovereign crown that offered freedom to escaped slaves and Native Americans in return for their allegiance and conversion to Christianity, would have had the same opportunity for commerce with Angola. Cuban fishermen living in the same vicinity contributes to this theory of trade activity. As a probable crossroads of exchange on the river, Angola would have had to accommodate the docking of ships. “A large trading ship drew ten to twelve feet of water so they could not dock close to land,” Dr. Cozzi explained. Since underwater archaeology on the Manatee River would be virgin territory, Dr. Cozzi hoped to find an anchor or remnants of docks that were built there. Adjacent to where “Looking for Angola” had searched on land the year before (2006), Dr. Cozzi would comb the waters. The area surveyed was defined by the results of historical research. Research conducted by the project’s lead historian helped the Angola team form a hypothesis of where along the river Angola most likely was located. In advance of the physical work to be done, Dr. Cozzi described another part of the process, “We spoke to a lot of people about things that they knew about, things that we might find in the river. It did not lead us any closer to Angola, but we learned about a lot of interesting events that took place on the river.” Keeping the public in the loop creates good will, as well as providing potential value for the “Looking for Angola” project. Some of what was learned, however, is helping other historical projects. Someone’s mention of boatbuilding yards west of our survey area on the river prompted the Florida Maritime Museum at Cortez to apply for a grant from the Florida Division of Historical Resources. Dr. Cozzi and others on the “Looking for Angola” team pray that this type of scenario will happen in kind for their project. “If evidence of Angola comes up during their search, they won’t ignore it.” May 2007 earmarks another active chapter in the story of “Looking for Angola”. For twelve days during that month, Dr. Cozzi and his team split their time on the river conducting remote sensing surveys and diving. Last year’s wildfires, blowing in smoke on the west winds, delayed the project for a couple of days. “You couldn’t see halfway across the river,” Dr. Cozzi noted. “We surveyed a two mile stretch of the Manatee River from East of the Desoto bridge to the mouth of the Braden River and then two miles up the Braden River. We used a magnetometer and sidescan sonar. A magnetometer finds ferrous anomalies (buried or subsurface objects made of iron). The sonar finds things that stick up above the bottom.” Excitement came along the way with a finding from the sonar survey. It showed something that looked like what they had been looking for…pier structures (remnants of docks). What they found were pilings sticking up that supported the trestlework for the railway. “Once we looked at maps, we realized that it was evidence of the railroad bridge. Even though we did not find evidence from Angola, we did find evidence of the first bridge crossing the Manatee River. In 1902, the Seaboard Airline Railroad Co. connected Palmetto to Bradenton across the Manatee River. Older people around the area today will remember it, because it operated until the late 1960’s. From Google Earth’s satellite image you can see it as clear as day…the berm that was built and where the trestlework ran, is defined as a light colored line running across where the railroad bridge had been. It is angled in a southeast to northwest direction.” 1900 ANGOLA TIMELINE1945 Kenneth Porter provides first hints about the community known as Angola in his published notes. 1946 John Goggin from University of Florida writes about the Black Seminoles in the Bahamas. 1971 Large cast iron stove plate is recovered from the banks of the Braden River. Mystery piece of the Angola puzzle. 1972Jan Carew’s interview of a descendent on Andros Island revealed her family’s oral history connection to fighting against Jackson in the Battle of the Suwannee in Florida. 1980 Bahamian Department of Archives publishes supplementary documentary evidence about Seminoles in Red Bays. 1981 Harry A. Kersey, Jr. addresses the same subject. 1983 In her book, Edge of Wilderness, Janet Snyder Matthews publishes the land claim by the Caldiz. The first evidence of a name for the place where the Black Seminoles had lived. 1980sHistorianJane Landersfindsarchival evidenceinSpainto pointarchaeologist KathleenDeagan oftheUniversityof Floridatowardthe discoveryofFort Mosé. 1980s Dr. Canter Brown, Jr., perceives the existence of the Angola settlement during research for his book Florida’s Peace River Frontier. His article published in Tampa Bay History in 1990 draws first public attention to the community. Looking for Angola UNDERWATER Dive and survey boats on the Manatee River. PHOTO: MARTHA WELLS MOTE MARINE LABORATORY Looking out the Seaboard railway line as the swing bridge is opening. PHOTO SOURCE: MANATEE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY CONTINUED ON PAGE 16
  2. 2. 16 LOOKING FOR ANGOLA A HERALD-TRIBUNE MEDIA GROUP NEWSPAPER-IN-EDUCATION PUBLICATION16 LOOKING FOR ANGOLA A HERALD-TRIBUNE MEDIA GROUP NEWSPAPER-IN-EDUCATION PUBLICATION “The Manatee library had it listed. We found it in maps and also a few aerial photographs of it, too. It had a swing bridge for boats to go through. I included this information in my report to the state…documenting the submerged cultural resources that we did come across in this survey.” Again not related to Angola, more history was revealed from local people’s recall of this area’s past. Dr. Cozzi commented, “There are other stories about things that could be in the river. Some are supported by historical documentation. For example, there is a potential for finding one of DeSoto’s boats somewhere in the Manatee River, which was scuttled (intentionally sunk) because it was no longer seaworthy. Other possible finds in the river related to historical documentation include Ambrister and Arbuthnot’s British ship, The Chance and a schooner belonging to the Gamble Family who settled on the north shore of the Manatee River. The vessels were wrecked by a mid-nineteenth century hurricane, placing them both around the time of Angola. Some sketchy stories include talk about a pirate ship at the mouth of the river. “Thesearesomeofthetantalizing stories that surface. The point is, surveying of river will continue, which is a positive outcome of the project. Not only does it spur on uncovering more history seemingly unrelated to Angola, but also other groups looking at the river could find evidence of Angola in their search for something else. Any of these things could take place next underwater in the Manatee River.” Dr. Cozzi doesn’t rule out a different survey of the same area that was covered in May. “Any place that ships come in and anchor for a while you find things that sailors threw overboard (i.e. bottles, etc.).” If there were a bottle down there, the equipment used in the survey would not have located it. Dr. Cozzi said finding a bottle or other like objects would require a diver’s survey, something that potentially could be done. “Divers swim along transect lines and feel around. We would work from shore and run a tape measure out into the water, search 10 feet on either side of it, and then move the tape measure over and repeat the process. If you have enough divers, you can cover an area of ground fairly well that way.” Dr. Cozzi mentioned the possibility of contacting the National Association of Black Scuba divers (NABS) for help, since they’ve done this kind of work before [Henrietta Marie, a slave ship off the Dry Tortugas]. Dr. Cozzi is currently in discussions with CSX Transportation (the people who bought out the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company) to see if they are interested in helping to document the railway bridge site through their corporate gifting program, which supports worthy projects in communities served by them. Further survey work might yet uncover something about Angola. The precursor to the river survey involved talking with the public, an intentional and important element of the “Looking for Angola” project. The process uncovered information that could help the search for Angola, as well as for other groups who may want to pursue those leads for their archaeological interests. Layers of the river bottom can tell many stories from different time periods. Perhaps the renewed interest in the Manatee River may bring a definitive lead for Angola during another group’s search for their story. Dr. Cozzi commented positively about his colleagues in the field, “If evidence of Angola comes up during their search, they won’t ignore it.” As conveyed by the spirit of Angola and reflected in the search for evidence of its existence, cooperation among individuals and between groups can produce great things. 1900 ANGOLA TIMELINE 1992 Dr. Canter Brown, Jr. discovers the name “Angola” after reviewing microfilm of Spanish land grant appeals. Dr. Uzi Baram arrives at New College and learns about Angola, during the process of getting involved in his new community. late 1990s 1999 Jane Landers’ book published: Black Society in Spanish Florida 2002 Dr. Rosalyn Howard’s book published: Black Seminoles in the Bahamas 2003 Vickie Oldham decides to make a documentary about Angola. She reconnects with Dr. Canter Brown, Jr., and pulls in Dr. Rosalyn Howard and Dr. Uzi Baram. Grant written and approved for LFA project. 2005Dr. Canter Brown, Jr., publishes an updated and comprehensive essay on Angola in Go Sound the Trumpet!, a book that he edited for the Florida A&M University History Department along with Dr. David H. Jackson, Jr. 1994Sarasota television reporter Vickie Oldham presents local residents the basics of the Angola story on her program “Common Ground: A Tale of Two Cities.” 2000 2007Looking for Angola” special section publishes in the Herald-Tribune. Research kicks off to find evidence of Angola in the Braden and Manatee Rivers CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 Survey boat, Illys, leaving the dock with the sonar at the bottom of the aluminum pole. The sonar was turned on so reporters could see the signal coming from the modern dock. Dr. Cozzi would be looking for a similar image of submerged dock remains. PHOTO CREDIT: MARTHA WELLS/MOTE MARINE LABORATORY An example of divers performing anunderwater archaeology survey usingtransect lines. Aerial photo, circa 1970. The railroad bridge used to extend out from the land and over the river. PHOTO SOURCE: MANATEE COUNTY LIBRARY

×