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Transformational Opportunities in Landscape Regeneration in Southern Africa: Setting the Stage

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Transformational Opportunities in Landscape Regeneration in Southern Africa: Setting the Stage

  1. 1. Transformational Opportunities in Landscape Regeneration in Southern Africa: Setting the Stage Dennis Garrity Drylands Ambassador, UNCCD Distinguished Senior Fellow, World Agroforestry Centre
  2. 2. Alarming Trend in Land Degradation in Southern Africa
  3. 3. A Perfect Storm of Challenges   •Soil fertility is further declining in many regions. • Rainfall is becoming more erratic and extreme.   • Temperatures are increasing, intensifying  crop stress.  • Inorganic fertilizers are increasingly expensive and risky to use. • Population growth rates remain very high and   farm sizes are rapidly declining. 
  4. 4. “All but four of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals are directly linked to the use of the land. “It will require bold action to turn from the current land  use practices and to restore more degraded land for  our use. “We need to adopt land use practices that are sustainable. And we have to restore more of the  degraded land to meet our future growth.” -- Monique Barbut    UNCCD Executive Secretary
  5. 5. “A lot of these agricultural practices are well known and surprisingly cheap. They include:  – No-Till agriculture, – EverGreen Agriculture, – Agroforestry, – Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration, and – Holistic Management and many more. They are underutilized because we have not  mustered the courage to make them competitive  through incentives that stimulate their adoption.”  -- Monique Barbut, UNCCD Executive Secretary
  6. 6. The Farming Systems of Africa
  7. 7. Malawi Maize Lands Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration Expanding Widely
  8. 8. The Parkland Renaissance on Niger farmlands
  9. 9. The albida effect • Microclimate buffering • Soil fertility improvement
  10. 10. Microclimatic buffering: Crop Canopy Temperature (CIMMYT, 2013)
  11. 11. Aerial view of a parkland dominated by Faidherbia in Niger
  12. 12. The 2nd Africa Drylands Declaration African Union (August 2014) «WE RECOMMEND AND PROPOSE that the drylands development community commit seriously to achieving the goal of enabling EVERY farm family and EVERY village across the drylands of Africa to be practicing Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration by the year 2025."
  13. 13. Evergreen agriculture with Faidherbia albida in Zambia.
  14. 14. DroughtDroughtFlood P addition resumed Long-term maize yield without fertilizer in a Gliricidia system P stopped
  15. 15. Impact of fertilizer trees on maize yield under farmer management _______________________________________ Plot management Yield (t/ha) Maize only 1.30 Maize + fertilizer trees 3.05 ____________________________________________________________ 2011 Survey of farms in six districts (Mzimba, Lilongwe, Mulanje, Salima, Thyolo and Machinga)
  16. 16. Malawi National Agroforestry Food Security Programme
  17. 17. FaidherbiaGliricidia Maize stubble Faidherbia Gliricidia Maize DRY SEASON WET SEASON Fertilizer-Fodder-Fuelwood Trees in Food Crop Production Systems
  18. 18. What would be the impact if African farmers deployed Evergreen Agriculture on a larger scale? If practiced on: 5 m ha ______________________________________________ Value of nitrogen fertilizers produced by farmers $ 500 million Amount of additional maize produced 5-10 m tons Value of additional maize produced $ 1-1.5 billion _______________________________________________________________________
  19. 19. New COMESA-ICRAF platform To assist the 19 member countries to link the scaling-up of fertilizer tree technologies to their input subsidy programs.
  20. 20. What is Evergreen Agriculture? A VISION of a more agroecologically intensive farming that integrates trees directly into crop and livestock production systems.
  21. 21. Types of Evergreen Agriculture 1. Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) on cropland 2. Conservation agriculture with trees (CAWT) 3. Conventional agriculture interplanted with trees
  22. 22. 17 Countries are engaged in EverGreen Agriculture Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration Conservation Agriculture with trees Trees interplanted in conventional tilled cropland Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration + Trees interplanted in conventional tilled cropland
  23. 23. African Climate Smart Agriculture Alliance Vision 25by25 25 million farmers practicing CSA by 2025
  24. 24. Four African countries have established their own restoration targets Ethiopia has committed 15 million hectares, DRC -- 8 million hectares, Uganda -- 2.5 million hectares, and Rwanda -- 2 million hectares.
  25. 25. Creating Action Plans 1. Achieve the Africa Union Target: Reach every dryland farm in Southern Africa with Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration. 2. With COMESA: Link national input subsidy programs with the massive upscaling of fertilizer-fodder-fuelwood trees supported by ICRAF.
  26. 26. Creating Action Plans (cont’d) 3. With NEPAD: Create national programs to scale-up Climate Smart Agriculture practice to reach 25 m farms by 2025. 4. With the Global Restoration Initiative: Make national commitments to the global target of restoring 350 m ha by 2030. Restored farmland, forests, grazing land.
  27. 27. “There is no shortage of productive land. “Only poor land management and the lack of political will to stir up land users and consumers into effective land stewards. “The proposed SDG are ambitious — as they should be. They have the seeds to turn us into better users than any other generation before us. But only if we are bold enough to adopt sustainable land use practices, and to restore degraded land to meet future growth.” -- Monique Barbut UNCCD Executive Secretary

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • In coordination with AU-NEPAD/CAADP, FARA/SROs, CCAFS, donors, representatives of some 20 countries, and ‘the big 5’ major development INGOs, ICRAF and the EGA Partnership sponsored a series of three coordinated workshops last week that provided the launching pad for a new, continent-wide alliance that is committed to having 25 million farm families practicing at least one Climate Smart Agriculture practice by 2025. We have dubbed this alliance “Vision 25by25”. Agroforestry and evergreen agriculture showed up as gold standard practices that achieve the triple win indicators for CSA. The “25by25 Campaign” could thus be an enormous boost to the up-scaling of agroforestry all-across the continent.

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