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Enabling Rural Advisory Services

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Enabling Rural Advisory Services

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Presentación de Delgermaa Chuluunbaatar (FAO), en el marco del “Taller Regional de Intercambio de Experiencias de Modelos de Extensión y Servicios rurales para la Agricultura Familiar”, realizado del 10 al 12 de mayo de 2017 en Cartagena, Colombia.

Presentación de Delgermaa Chuluunbaatar (FAO), en el marco del “Taller Regional de Intercambio de Experiencias de Modelos de Extensión y Servicios rurales para la Agricultura Familiar”, realizado del 10 al 12 de mayo de 2017 en Cartagena, Colombia.

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Enabling Rural Advisory Services

  1. 1. Enabling Rural Advisory Services Delgermaa Chuluunbaatar Research and Extension Unit, FAO Cartagena, Colombia 10 May 2017
  2. 2. Global challenges: Global population growth 0 2 000 000 4 000 000 6 000 000 8 000 000 10 000 000 12 000 000 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 2055 2060 2065 2070 2075 2080 2085 2090 2095 2100 40% 50% 67% Percentage of people living in urban areas
  3. 3. Global challenges: Increased food demand 0 2 000 000 4 000 000 6 000 000 8 000 000 10 000 000 12 000 000 1950 1965 1980 1995 2010 2025 2040 2055 2070 2085 2100 • FAO: estimates that food production must rise about 60% by 2050 to feed a larger population.
  4. 4. Global challenges: Limited natural resources 0 2 000 000 4 000 000 6 000 000 8 000 000 10 000 000 12 000 000 1950 1965 1980 1995 2010 2025 2040 2055 2070 2085 2100 • FAO: Increased food demand; food production 60% by 2050 0 1000000 2000000 3000000 4000000 5000000 0 500000000 1E+09 1,5E+09 2E+09 2,5E+09 3E+09 Cereal Production (MMT) Arable land (ha)
  5. 5. Global challenges: Degrading resources 0 2 000 000 4 000 000 6 000 000 8 000 000 10 000 000 12 000 000 1950 1965 1980 1995 2010 2025 2040 2055 2070 2085 2100 • FAO: Increased food demand; food production 60% by 2050 0 1000000 2000000 3000000 4000000 5000000 0 500000000 1E+09 1,5E+09 2E+09 2,5E+09 3E+09 1961 1965 1969 1973 1977 1981 1985 1989 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 2013 • 1/3 of farm land are degraded • Up to 75 % of crop genetic diversity has been lost, 22 % at risk • Over the past decade, some 13 million ha of forests a year were converted into other land uses • Half of the fish stock are exploited • The share of water available for agriculture is expected to decline to 40% by 2050 as overall demand is projected to increase by 55%
  6. 6. Global challenges: Climate Change 0 2 000 000 4 000 000 6 000 000 8 000 000 10 000 000 12 000 000 1950 1965 1980 1995 2010 2025 2040 2055 2070 2085 2100 • FAO: Increased food demand; food production 60% by 2050 0 1000000 2000000 3000000 4000000 5000000 0 500000000 1E+09 1,5E+09 2E+09 2,5E+09 3E+09 1961 1965 1969 1973 1977 1981 1985 1989 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 2013 • The rapid change in the world’s climate is inevitable  Increasing temperature  More extreme and frequent weather events  Sea-level rise  Changes in climate patterns • Agriculture is intimately linked to climate  Cause - contributes to 20% of GHG emission  Effect - most vulnerable to climate change • The impact of climate change is beyond food production: food price, availability, livelihoods of people, instability… • Urgent need to support agricultural producers to adjust and adapt to the climate change and mitigate GHG emission.
  7. 7. Addressing challenges: Rural Advisory Services • Rural Advisory Services are instrumental: • in supporting agricultural producers to increase their production and improve their livelihood sustainably, and • in building sustainable and more resilient agriculture systems. • Access to adequate advisory services and markets must be improved. “…different activities that provide information and services needed and demanded by farmers and other actors to assist them in developing their own technical, organizational, and management skills and practices…” GFRAS 2010
  8. 8. RAS: Where do we stand – global trends? Some realities on the ground: • Still public driven • Under funded • Under staffed • Low capacity • Etc. Trends & Demands • Pluralism: new & untraditional partners • New services & roles • New topics & areas practices • New skills & capacities • New ways to enable RAS (policies, governance, finance, coordination, etc.)
  9. 9. RAS: Changing realities • Diversity of farmers and their needs/demands – complex problems • Requires joint efforts and tailor made solutions • Diversity of actors in place • Potential complementarity of providers and increased impact • Focus of services – from production to improving livelihoods through market oriented services • Access to information – through use of ICT for exchange, learning, …. • Changing roles (e.g. role of state in pluralism – coordination?) • Farmers – from receiving messages to pro-actively searching for advise and involve in joint decision making • Changing approaches – linear, bi-lateral to participatory approach with system perspective
  10. 10. RAS: Challenges • Capacity of service providers to be demand-let and market oriented • Lack of up-stream support - pre-service, in-service training, etc. • Articulation of other actors - lack of coordination mechanism, incentives, and regulatory framework • Weak institutions - at national and sub-national levels • Lack of funding - for non-traditional services such as innovation brokering • Lack of evidence and documentation for measuring impact of RAS
  11. 11. Addressing challenges: enabling transformation • Calls for a change: business as usual is not an option • No simple “technological fix” • Reorientation of enabling environment,…for promotion of sustainable agricultural systems for food/nutrition security and reduced poverty.  Policies and institutions  Intelligent investment and financing opportunities  Incentives for collective action, group approaches, and coordinated efforts/partnerships  Improved infrastructure, access to credit, climate information, & other advisory services Transformative change will only become possible if supported by appropriate policies, institutional frameworks, and investment and financing mechanisms.
  12. 12. FAO: what are we doing? • Assist member countries to reach their SDG targets through transformation of agricultural innovation systems • Building capacity to innovate (TAP, CDAIS projects) • Developing diagnostic tools to assess national innovation system and help developing national strategy for agricultural innovation (COAG 2016)  Developing a strategy for agricultural extension and advisory system reform for pluralistic, demand-led, and market oriented services.  Developing e-modules, how-to guides, and other knowledge products related to the extension reforms  Carry out studies on extension approaches, investment, good practices, etc. https:fao.org/researchand extension ,
  13. 13. • 4 Cases: Peru; Bolivia; National University of Agriculture in Honduras, and CATIE in Costa Rica. • Acknowledgments: Silvia Sarapura, Senior advisor at KIT • Key findings: • FFS aproach is used in all countries • Mostly external project and programme driven • Elements of institutionalization at local, national and regional level • Local level: FFS groups • National level: Universities (UNA), national policy, NGOs, • Regional level: CATIE, CIP, regional association. FFS Study: Overview
  14. 14. Agriculture is changing, Rural Advisory Services Must too Delgermaa Chuluunbaatar, Agricultural Extension Officer, Research and Extension Unit, FAO

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