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Lec-4-Customer-Interface.pdf

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An assembly language is a type of low-level programming language that is intended to communicate directly with a computer's hardware. Unlike machine language, which consists of binary and hexadecimal characters, assembly languages are designed to be readable by humans.

An assembly language is a type of low-level programming language that is intended to communicate directly with a computer's hardware. Unlike machine language, which consists of binary and hexadecimal characters, assembly languages are designed to be readable by humans.

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Lec-4-Customer-Interface.pdf

  1. 1. Customer Interface — Today’s Objective Develop an understanding of the technology – mediated customer interface
  2. 2. Customer Interface l The seven design elements of the customer interface l The alternative “look and feel” approaches to design l The five content archetypes l Be concerned with community l The levers used to customize a site l Types of communication a firm maintains with its customer base l The alternative pricing models of commerce archetypes l Case studies: Schwab and Palm l Conclusion
  3. 3. The 7Cs of the Customer Interface Context Site’s layout and design Commerce Site’s capability to enable commercial transactions Connection Degree site is linked to other sites Communication The ways sites enable site-to- user communication or two-way communication Customization Site’s ability to self-tailor to different users or to allow personalization Community The ways sites enable user-to- user communication Content Text, pictures, sound and video that webpages contain
  4. 4. Dimensions of Context VISUAL Section Breakdown Ø The way the site is organized into subcomponents Linking Structure Ø The site’s approach to linking alternative sections Navigation Tools Ø Facilitate how the user moves through the site Color Scheme Ø The colors used throughout the site Visual Themes Ø Help to tell the stories portrayed across the site PERFORMANCE Speed Ø The time required to display a site page on the user’s screen Reliability Ø How often is the site down? Ø Percent of times that the site correctly downloads to user Platform Independence Ø How well the site runs on various platforms Media Accessibility Ø The site’s ability to run on various devices Usability Ø The ease with which the site can be navigated by users The context of a site can take many different forms:
  5. 5. Dimensions to Content Content refers to all digital information included on the site. There are four key dimensions to content, each carrying choices about how to convey the site’s content:: Dimension Choices Offering Mix Appeal Mix Multimedia Mix Content Type Products Services Information Cognitive functional, low price, availability, etc. Emotional humor, warmth, stories, etc. Text Audio Video Image Graphics Current Reference
  6. 6. Intro to the Five Content Archetypes Offering Dominant We will first describe each archetype and then give an example of each: Information Dominant Market Dominant Superstore Category Killer Specialty Store
  7. 7. A Framework for Understand Offering-Dominant Archetypes Superstore Category Killer Specialty Store Number of Product Categories Multiple Single Narrow Broad Depth of Product Line Classifying content archetypes on two dimensions:
  8. 8. Superstore Example — Amazon.com One-stop shop where the customer can find a wide range of goods in multiple product categories: Note the array of product categories on the site.
  9. 9. Category Killer Example — Petsmart.com Exclusively provides products and services by specific product or by a customer- needs category: Again, note the categories; rather than being broad, they focus on a single vertical.
  10. 10. Specialty Store Example — Frontgate.com Focuses on exceptional quality and exclusivity while selling single or multiple categories of products: The site offers a broad array of products, but they are all high- end, premium quality products
  11. 11. Information-Dominant Example — Business 2.0 Organize and house vast archives of information and provide tools to the customer to explore areas of interest and find answers to specific questions: “New economy, new rules, new leaders” — this site is focused entirely on providing timely information to business leaders
  12. 12. Content Archetype Physical Product Information Service Superstore Walmart.com Amazon.com CEOExpress.com IBMSolutions.com Category Killer Petsmart.com DowJones.com CNNfn.com Schwab.com Specialty Store Frontgate.com Forrester.com Tradex.com Information Dominant Census.gov IFilm.net Digitalthink.com Market Dominant PlasticsNet.com VerticalNet.com Monster.com Drill Down — Content Archetypes vs. Offering Types Each of the content archetypes can be illustrated with a product, information or services example:
  13. 13. Market-Dominant Example — PlasticsNet.com Create markets where buyers and sellers congregate to conclude transactions: This site creates an online market for the plastics industry; note the supplier information and product specs available
  14. 14. • Cohesion • Effectiveness • Help • Relationships • Language • Self-Regulation Just Friends Enthusiasts Friends in Need Players Traders Need Fulfillment • Inclusion • Mutual Influence • Shared Emotional Experiences Degree of Participation Communities — Elements, Types and Benefits Elements of Community Types of Communities Member Outcomes: Participation and Benefits
  15. 15. Dimensions of Community The cohesion of a site can come about through several different methods: INTERACTIVE Chat § Asynchronous chat allows users to consider and formulate responses in nonreal time Instant Messaging § Allows messages to happen quickly because each participant sees the message within seconds of when it is sent Message Boards § Allows users to communicate by posting messages at a location on the site Member-to-Member E-Mail § The “killer app” of the Web, acting as a virtual post office for digitized messages VISUAL Public Member Webpages § Community members may have the option of crafting their own webpages on a particular site Member Content § Similar to public member webpages, this content is generated by members
  16. 16. Dimensions of Customization Customization of a site can occur in many different ways: PERSONALIZATION Log-in Registration § The site recognizes return users and configures itself accordingly Cookies § Temporary files that track and gather data about user’s behavior Personalized E-Mail Accounts § Provided free-of-charge to site users Content and Layout Configuration § Users select layout and content based on their interests Storage § Sites provide virtual hard-disk storage Agents § Programs designed to perform simple tasks TAILORING Based on Past User Behavior § Many sites adjust themselves dynamically based on a user’s past behavior and preferences Based on Behavior of Other Users With Similar Preferences § Some sites make recommendations to the user based on preferences of other users with similar profiles
  17. 17. Dimensions of Communication Communication between a site and its users can occur in many different ways: BROADCAST Mass Mailings § Broadcast transmissions of large volumes of e-mail targeted at large audiences FAQs § Answers to frequently asked questions E-Mail Newsletters § Inform site subscribers of site changes, special offers, etc. Content-Update Reminders § E-mail reflecting user interest in a particular content area Broadcast Events § Events can be broadcast from a website (webcast) that allows limited user control over such things as camera angle INTERACTIVE E-Commerce Dialogue § Organizations and users trade e-mails regarding order placement, tracking and fulfillment Customer Service § Organizations can provide customer service through trading e-mails or live online dialogue User Input § User-generated content such as supplier ratings and user feedback to the site
  18. 18. One-to-Many, Non-Responding Example — TheStandard.com Communicates with users through mass mailings targeted at defined audiences:
  19. 19. One-to-Many, Non-Responding Example — CNN.com Communicates with users through mass mailings targeted at defined audiences: CNN.com sends out breaking news e-mail alerts to interested users.
  20. 20. One-to-Many, Responding Example — BizRate.com Communicates with a mass user group logged on as registered users or through e-mailings targeted at specific users: Customers rate their experience with online merchants; these ratings are gathered and communicated to registered users of BizRate.com.
  21. 21. One-to-Many, Live Interaction Example — American Banker Web Seminar Allows users to interact with the site live, with information exchanged back and forth in real time: This site recently broadcast a live seminar; registered users were able to participate by asking questions via chat in real time.
  22. 22. One-to-One, Non-Responding User Example — Hallmark.com Sends personalized messages to users to address specific user interests or needs, but there are no means for customer response: Hallmark.com allows users to manage their schedules by reminding users of important upcoming dates (birthdays, anniversaries, etc.).
  23. 23. One-to-One, Responding User Example — Amazon.com Sends users personalized messages that address specific user interests or needs with the opportunity for users to respond: Users can create their own storefront using Amazon’s zShops. Users post all information related to the products they wish to sell on Amazon’s site; they can also check order status on the site and be notified of sales via e-mail.
  24. 24. One-to-One, Live Interaction Example — LivePerson.com Sends and receives personalized user messages or carries on chat sessions that address specific user interests or needs: This site offers online customer support in real time via chat sessions.
  25. 25. Dimensions of Commerce There are many tools that sites provide to originate and facilitate commerce: TOOLS FOR ENABLING COMMERCE Registration § Allows the site to store information about users and user preferences Shopping Cart, One-Click Shopping § Facilitates online shopping by making it more user-friendly Security, Credit-Card Approval § Enables online transactions by allowing users to securely share credit-card information Orders Through Affiliates § Sites must be able to track orders that come from and go to affiliates Configuration Technology § Users can test product compatibility, and price trade-offs and product substitutions online. Order Tracking, Delivery Options § Once orders are placed on the site, users can choose how they would like their products delivered and track those orders from the site to their front door.
  26. 26. Conclusion After today’s lesson, you should be able to answer the following questions: l What are the seven design elements of the customer interface? l What are the alternative “look and feel” approaches to design? l What are the five content archetypes? l Why be concerned with community? l What are the levers used to customize a site? l What types of communication can a firm maintain with its customer base? l How does a firm connect with other businesses? l What are alternative pricing models of commerce archetypes?

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